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Dan Marino Withdraws From NFL Concussion Lawsuit

Earlier today, I noted that former Dolphins Quarterback Dan Marino had joined a lawsuit against the NFL related to its treatment of concussion injuries. This afternoon, Marino announced that he was withdrawing from the suit:

The football world was stunned Monday when a concussion lawsuit with Hall of Fame quarterback Dan Marino as star plaintiff was announced. Evidently, Marino himself was just as stunned to hear the news.

Late Tuesday afternoon, Marino confirmed the news that was reported by the South Florida Sun Sentinel earlier in the day: that he would withdraw the lawsuit filed in Pennsylvania as a twin to the massive concussion litigation waiting for settlement confirmation in the same court. In a statement provided to The MMQB shortly at 5:40 p.m. Tuesday, Marino said:

“Within the last year I authorized a claim to be filed on my behalf just in case I needed future medical coverage to protect me and my family in the event I later suffered from the effects of head trauma. In so doing I did not realize I would be automatically listed as a plaintiff in a lawsuit against the NFL. I have made the decision it is not necessary for me to be part of any claims or this lawsuit and therefore I am withdrawing as a plaintiff effective immediately. I am sympathetic to other players who are seeking relief who may have suffered head injuries. I also disclaim any references in the form complaint of current head injuries.”

The suit was curious in the first place because Marino, as a former player in the era covered by $765 milion concussion-suit settlement, would automatically be eligible for benefits when or if Judge Anita Brody institutes the settlement that the NFL and attorneys for the aggrieved 4,000 players or player estates agreed to last September. She has reportedly been skeptical that there is enough money to cover benefits for the large number of players who could come forward claiming head injuries when they surface among retired players. For instance, players who suffer from ALS—such as Steve Gleason and Kevin Turner—would be eligible to receive settlement checks of $5 million apiece from the settlement pool. Thus the concern that there would be enough money for the legions of players who could come forward in future years.

Perhaps also related to this story is the fact that Marino is apparently in negotiations with the Dolphins for a front office role in the organization starting with this upcoming season. Obviously, it would be awkward for someone in that position to be simultaneously suing the National Football League

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About Doug Mataconis
Doug holds a B.A. in Political Science from Rutgers University and J.D. from George Mason University School of Law. He joined the staff of OTB in May, 2010 and also writes at Below The Beltway. Follow Doug on Twitter | Facebook

Comments

  1. Ron Beasley says:

    I have 2 sons and would not let either one of them play football. They are both in their 40s now so that’s a long time ago. They both played soccer and basketball. By the time my oldest got to high school it had reached the point where all sports were 12 months a year and so you had to choose. Our summer vacations were often going to basketball tournaments in various parts of the Pacific NW.

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  2. al-Ameda says:

    Perhaps also related to this story is the fact that Marino is apparently in negotiations with the Dolphins for a front office role in the organization starting with this upcoming season. Obviously, it would be awkward for someone in that position to be simultaneously suing the National Football League

    We have a winner.

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  3. the Q says:

    Maybe Dan has memory problems related to head trauma incurred during his playing career.

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