Michael Vick’s Dogs

What happened to them? Well, some were euthanized while others were sent to rescue organizations around the country like Bad Rap in San Francisco. Here are links to some of the photos of Vick’s dogs.

The notion that a dog used in fighting is some how ruined and not fit to be a family pet is simply not true, at least as a hard rule. Even an American Pit Bull Terrier used in fighting will usually be friendly to humans. It has to be, since in the pit will be a referee and two handlers.

Still these dogs go through Hell and for some it is just too much and these poor animals have to be euthanized as they no longer want anything to do with humans (something I can understand after reading about how that low life douchebag Vick treated his dogs).

If you want to see what these dogs looked like when Bad Rap evaluated them click here. Additional links on the dogs taken in by Bad Rap, Home to Heal and See them Now.

FILED UNDER: Steve Verdon, , ,
Steve Verdon
About Steve Verdon
Steve has a B.A. in Economics from the University of California, Los Angeles and attended graduate school at The George Washington University, leaving school shortly before staring work on his dissertation when his first child was born. He works in the energy industry and prior to that worked at the Bureau of Labor Statistics in the Division of Price Index and Number Research.

Comments

  1. odograph says:

    It’s sad that so many dogs are put down for lack of a good home … but I also think it is a bit sad that pit bulls have prospered in the popularity lottery while breeds like Irish setters have faded.

    We don’t usually have to worry about setters being “usually friendly”.

    It certainly takes less skill to raise up a properly socialized bird or herding dog.




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  2. Bithead says:

    We have a dog that was apparently bred for the purpose, and didn’t make the cut. We found her at the local shelter. She’s a wonderful family pet, and loves people, Loves trucks lovesgoing out in the RV, and so on, but hates other dogs. Another dog walks into the room and this normally placid and easy-going dog unleashes her inner Spitzbergen.

    Scared to death, really, is what she is, in those situations.

    She’s getting up there, now… in dog years, she’s about 105 if such measurements mean anything. She’s an object lesson in what Tom T Hall meant when he talked about the love of an old dog. But she still has the mental scar tissue of the treatment she got as a pup.




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  3. Steve Verdon says:

    Odograph,

    We don’t usually have to worry about setters being “usually friendly”.

    Yes you do. Human aggression is probably more common in “setter” breeds than with the American Pit Bull Terrier where traditionally breeding was aimed at removing human aggression. The selective pressure on the American Pit Bull Terrier was tremendous, if a dog showed any sign of human aggression it was put down as an unsound dog, hence only dogs that didn’t show human aggression were bred. And keep in mind the context of my comment, it was in regards to dogs that have been pit fighters.

    It certainly takes less skill to raise up a properly socialized bird or herding dog.

    Uhhhmmm, no. Those dogs, like a pit bull, are useful because of their prey drive. All working dogs are like this. And it depends on the dog as well as the breed.

    The problem with the APBT is that they can be dog aggressive and as such require a diligent owner who will ensure that the back yard is escape proof, not take the dog to a dog park, and always take the dog out on a leash (this last one is good advice for all dog owners, IMO). The only other additional issue is extra socialization with other dogs and animals early on. Another problem could be human attention, these dogs are so people oriented, that not having people around for too long is like torture to them. In this case they could be destructive damaging furniture or your backyard.

    Not a breed for everyone, but then again no breed is for everyone. Each comes with its own unique set of problems, and issues, IMO.

    Bithead,

    I don’t my APBTs history, but it could very well be like your dog’s. She loves people and hates other dogs aside from my rottweiler. Was she a rejected pit fighter? Maybe. All I know is that she simply loves people and my other dog and that’s good enough for me.




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  4. odograph says:

    The problem with your “narrative fallacy” Steve is that it supposes that fighting dogs were expected to live normal suburban lives, with children, between fighting.

    No one ever ran a purposeful kennel Steve?




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  5. odograph says:

    BTW, I understand that “Pits are as safe as any other dog” is a political correctness, but that doesn’t make it true.




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  6. Triumph says:

    In my neighborhood in South Central LA, they usually sell the dogs that are crappy fighters to the Chop Suey take-out joints.

    I’m not sure what the Chop Suey people do with they dogs, but I stay away from they Sweet-and-Sour Surprise!




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  7. odograph says:

    (There is an unfortunate story about cats in china making the rounds. The recession is not yet that bad.)




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  8. […] Verdon has some thoughts and these links to photos of Vick’s […]




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  9. lunacy says:

    We have a big goofy pit bull in our extended family. He’s been socialized with other dogs from early on. It’s interesting to watch him out in the yard with my retriever. Within a few laps around the yard, the retriever is mimicking his greco-roman type moves. He’s like a tank. A big, sweet, goofy tank.

    I’m glad so many of these dogs found happy homes. It’s sad how the breed suffers – from over popularity, mis-educated owners and a horrible sport.

    These dogs do require more diligence in some respects, than many other dogs. Well, all large and/or powerful dogs require strict training and socialization as well as plenty of exercise. The good part is, a lot of effort in training and socializing from a human in a puppy’s youth equals 100% best friend for a lifetime.

    And any dog requires real commitment. Sadly, I think many people get dogs on larks without understanding what is required of them.




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  10. tom p says:

    Dogs… ya gotta love them. When it comes to Pit bulls… I am ambivalent, well aware of the human/dog interaction and the various perturbations there of, I once met a pit bull on a gravel bar, seemed to be the sweetest dog in the world, than it met my buddy’s dog… we almost killed it getting it to let go.

    As a firm beleiver in the “there is no bad dog”.. I have put a few dogs down. Not because I wanted to, but because I had to.

    I am preferable to retreivers and G shepards myself.




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  11. Steve Verdon says:

    The problem with your “narrative fallacy” Steve is that it supposes that fighting dogs were expected to live normal suburban lives, with children, between fighting.

    No one ever ran a purposeful kennel Steve?

    Did you actually read what I wrote? The American Pit Bull Terrier went through tremendous selective pressure by breeders for well over 100 years. If in a few generations breeders can create a new breed what would dozens and dozens of generations of purposeful selective breeding do? The point is that a well bred American Pit Bull Terrier should show zero signs of human aggression.

    This doesn’t mean you can’t try to breed a mongrel that is human aggressive. Take American Pit Bull Terriers and other breeds and mix them together so you do get man biters.

    BTW, I understand that “Pits are as safe as any other dog” is a political correctness, but that doesn’t make it true.

    Actually it is true. As is noted, and will note again, human aggression has always been an undesirable trait in the American Pit Bull Terrier and for decades this has been America’s primary family dog.

    Have you looked into fad dogs, and the “dangerous dog” of the day problem? Dangerous dogs of the day have been:

    Doberman Pinschers,
    Rottweilers,
    St. Bernards,
    Newfoundlands,
    Bloodhounds.

    The German shepherd has managed to avoid the moniker for an interesting reason: Rin Tin Tin. Just as German shepherds were primed to become the next demon dog, Rin Tin Tin hit the silver screen. A bit later Rin Tin Tin moved to the small screen. And if you compare bite data collected by Karen Delise and American Kennel Club data German Shephards were more “dangerous” (i.e. to be involved in fatal dog attacks) that the Doberman.

    What doomed the doberman? WWII. The Doberman was a “German attack dog” a “Nazi death camp dog”. Never mind that the U.S. Marine Corp used Dobermans and that is where you get the term “Devil Dogs”–Dobermans in service to U.S. Marines.

    Funny things is that before and after a stint as the monster dog of the day, these dogs are family pets where the “horror stories” all but disappear.

    In short, don’t believe everything you see in the media. The underlying story maybe more complicated that you think. For example, stories about a Pit Bull fighting off two Akita’s to save a boy don’t often make the paper, and rarely the national news. A Pit Bull that knocks its owner son out the way of a striking rattle snake also isn’t the kind of story many in the media are interested in. Call a news agency about a dog bite you’ll get a big fat yawn. Claim it was a pit bull dog and you’ll have a news crew on your lawn before you hang up. Sometimes, the media drives the news and they aren’t disinterested observers. Take for example a Time magazine article detailing the kind of abuse necessary to turn a fine family pet into a viscious dog that is a danger to any human around it.

    lunacy,

    The good part is, a lot of effort in training and socializing from a human in a puppy’s youth equals 100% best friend for a lifetime.

    I would say that this is a requirement irrespective of what type of dog you have and isn’t breed specific. The only dog that ever bit me was a small Schnauzer. My son who has lived with German Shepherds, Rottweilers, and American Pit Bull Terriers has been only bitten by….a Shih Tzu.

    And any dog requires real commitment. Sadly, I think many people get dogs on larks without understanding what is required of them.

    Sadly all too true. I’d personally love to give anyone getting a dog as a gift without first alerting the recipient of such a gift nice shouting down. It may seem cute and cuddly and sweet, but after a couple of accidents you have a fine little puppy heading for a dead bucket at a shelter.

    tom p,

    When it comes to Pit bulls… I am ambivalent, well aware of the human/dog interaction and the various perturbations there of, I once met a pit bull on a gravel bar, seemed to be the sweetest dog in the world, than it met my buddy’s dog… we almost killed it getting it to let go.

    Classic APBT behavior. If the dog was stray it might have been the loser in a fight and abandoned. Sad really as it could have made probably made a good family pet with the right owners.

    Oh, and an FYI, if you find yourself in a similar situtation try getting behind the Pit Bull and lifting its rear legs. Most dogs will disengage or be unable to sustain their hold.




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  12. tom p says:

    Oh, and an FYI, if you find yourself in a similar situtation try getting behind the Pit Bull and lifting its rear legs. Most dogs will disengage or be unable to sustain their hold.

    That’s exactly how we got it to let go. I never made the connection. Thanx for the tip, I’ll remember that. (and for the record, it was a rescue dog that had chewed thru it’s tether and wandered into our camp)

    German Shepards bite more people than any other breed. I think it’s because they seem to have a very strong territorial instinct. Most of the times they bite, it is because somebody has “invaded” their territory and they are protecting it. (think “the garbage man is stealing the trash!”)




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