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Movement For Romney In Three Key Swing States?

Polling from two separate pollsters shows Mitt Romney appearing to make gains in Ohio, Virginia, and Florida in the wake of Wednesday’s debate.

First up there’s We Ask America:

Next up there are a trio of polls from Rasmussen which show us the following:

  • Ohio — Obama 50% Romney 49%
  • Virginia — Romney 49% Obama 48%
  • Florida — Romney 49% Obama 47%

All the usual caveats about Rasmussen apply, of course, but it’s noteworthy that these results are replicated for the most part in the WAA poll, which has been fairly reliable so far this year. Not surprisingly, these results bring major changes to the RCP Averages for all three states. Ohio, where Obama had previously had a lead over five points in the poll average, the President now has a +3.2 point lead. In Virginia, it’s down to +0.4. And in Florida it is tied.  Looking over at the national polls, there’s no real evidence of movement in either of the national tracking polls right now, but that’s generally to be expected since we’ve only had one full polling night since the debate and those polls average their results over multiple days (3 days for Rasmussen and 7 days for Gallup). If there is movement there, though, we should begin to see it early next week.

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About Doug Mataconis
Doug holds a B.A. in Political Science from Rutgers University and J.D. from George Mason University School of Law. He joined the staff of OTB in May, 2010 and also writes at Below The Beltway. Follow Doug on Twitter | Facebook

Comments

  1. nitpicker says:

    “We Ask America” has a pro-Republican house effect similar to Rasmussen’s. Just saying.

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 5 Thumb down 1

  2. PJ says:

    In today’s Gallup, Obama has gained a point and now has a 5 point lead, in the two days since the debate Romney has failed to gain any points.
    if there is any movement due to the debate, it won’t be much at all.

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 2 Thumb down 2

  3. Smooth Jazz says:

    “All the usual caveats about Rasmussen apply, of course,”

    Yeah Right, “All the usual caveats about Rasmussen apply” probably doesn’t include the caveat that Rasmussen was the most accurate pollster for the 2004 & 2008 Presidential elections, certainly much more accurate from the left wing juiced up polls from PPP/NY Times/NBC/CNN/CBS, et al that you cosider credible. I’ve never seen you mention any caveats when you cite DailyKOS/SEUI/PPP polls for example, as if those polls are more representative than Rasmussen. LMAO. “Usual Caveats”. That is rich!

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 3 Thumb down 9

  4. mantis says:

    @Smooth Jazz:

    2010: Rasmussen Polls Were Biased and Inaccurate

    That’s why there must be caveats. Rasmussen has seriously reliability issues due to its polling model, as has been explained to you repeatedly.

    Moron.

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 9 Thumb down 3

  5. Smooth Jazz says:

    Hey BOZO, Tag you’re it: Rasmussen: Most Accurate Pollster in 2008/2004

    http://www.kenkrogue.com/random-musings/romney-tied-with-obama-says-rasmussen-most-accurate-pollster-in-20082004-3-on-forbes-com/

    http://www.fordham.edu/images/academics/graduate_schools/gsas/elections_and_campaign_/poll%20accuracy%20in%20the%202008%20presidential%20election.pdf

    You say FI, I say FO. 2004 & 2008 were Presidential elections which is what 2012 is. And I don’t take explanations from anyone from a far left blog. At any rate, my point is as follows: If Rasmussen comes with caveats, then PPP & NY Times & NBC polls should come with caveats as well because they are sponsored by left wing entities with dubious records. Especially PPP, the Daily KOS pollster with obvious skin in the game for Obama.

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 2 Thumb down 5

  6. stonetools says:

    My guess is that after people absorb the good unemployment news , the Romney post-election bounce will be erased. On to the vice presidential debates!

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 2 Thumb down 2

  7. mattb says:

    Next up there are a trio of polls from Rasmussen which show us the following:
    Ohio — Obama 50% Romney 49%
    Virginia — Romney 49% Obama 48%
    Florida — Romney 49% Obama 47%

    The Virginia and Florida ones are flips from the previous Rasmussen polling cycle. Ohio, on the other hand, has held steady for two Ras polls with Obama’s 1% lead.

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

  8. john personna says:

    Team Obama just has to press back, illustrating the etch-a-sketch play.

    Seriously, can Mitt pretend to be Barack in the last weeks and win on that basis?

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 1 Thumb down 0

  9. Smooth Jazz says:

    “My guess is that after people absorb the good unemployment news , the Romney post-election bounce will be erased.”

    LOL, You Liberals are reduced to hoping and praying now, as a bumbling & delirious Obama tries to recover from his drubbing the other night by relying on numbers that, at best, are a wash and murky. Meanwhile, in the real world, this should concern you even more:

    Voter Turnout Modeling Predicts Big Ohio Trouble for Obama:

    http://pjmedia.com/blog/ohio-poll-analyst-voter-turnout-modeling-predicts-big-ohio-trouble-for-obama/

    ttp://washingtonexaminer.com/ohio-shocker-gop-closes-early-voting-gap-boosting-romney/article/2509838

    And you can shoot the messenger PJ Media as a right wing blog all you want, a designation PJ Media will happily concede. The question is the message right: That registration in Predominately Dem counties in OH is WAY down from 2008. That is a dangerous omen for Obama and one that the bogus OH Obama up 10 polls that this blog used as a basis to declare the race over certainly didn’t capture.

    Can’t wait for the next MSNBC/NY Times/CNN poll of OH: Obama by 30.LMAO.

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 1 Thumb down 8

  10. Curtis says:

    The scary thing for Romney supporters is that even the Florida, Ohio, Virginia trifecta isn’t enough to win without flipping another state that is leaning even more heavily towards Obama. He’d have to have New Hampshire, Colorado, Iowa, Wisconsin, or Nevada go along and not lose North Carolina.

    That is one heck of an inside straight he is drawing for at this point.

    It will take a few more days to figure out how much of a bounce Romney got from the first debate, and then Obama will probably bounce a tick based on today’s job numbers. And much like many people loved Ryan’s speech at the convention and then the next couple of days focused on nothing but the lies therein, the media coverage of the debate is turning to focus on Romney’s distortions of his platform before Wednesday night.

    So I am not yet nervous as an Obama supporter.

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 3 Thumb down 0

  11. mantis says:

    @Smooth Jazz:

    If Rasmussen comes with caveats, then PPP & NY Times & NBC polls should come with caveats as well because they are sponsored by left wing entities with dubious records.

    No, because Rasmussen’s problems are due to its unique methods and are well documented. You just assume there is something wrong with other polls, without actually showing any evidence.

    And I don’t take explanations from anyone from a far left blog.

    If you think Nate Silver is a far left blog, you have already shown how little you understand about this topic. Guess who predicted 2008 more accurately than any pollster? Nate Silver, that’s who. He correctly predicted the presidential race in 49 of 50 states and correctly predicted every senate race.

    Not only that, but he was accurate all along the way, from the primaries where he correctly predicted Obama’s big win in North Carolina, which most pollsters had as a much closer race, on down the line.

    Rasmussen, on the other hand, is all over the place. He just so happens to get his presidential poll in line with the average just before election day. And if you don’t like Nate Silver explaining what is wrong with Rasmussen’s polls, despite Silver’s incredible track record, you can listen to someone else if you like. The web is full of critiques of his methods.

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 5 Thumb down 1

  12. Anderson says:

    The WAA polls were robopolls, i.e. skipped cellphone-only voters.

    I fully expect some downside for Obama, but these polls aren’t going to convince me. The Ohio result in particular looks dubious. We should know by Tuesday or so.

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 1 Thumb down 0

  13. Anderson says:

    @mantis: Also, the “far-left” Silver actually predicted the GOP would do even *better* than it did in the 2010 election.

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 1

  14. Stonetools says:

    @stonetools:

    Ugh, that should be post debate bounce.

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

  15. Just Me says:

    I think Silver is pretty far left, but he analyses the polls fairly.

    I think Romney is probably going to take Florida, but I have strong doubts about Virginia and Ohio.

    Also, when it comes to swing states Romney has to win all of them-while Obama only has to win some of them. I think it unlikely even if he gets a bounce that it will allow him to run the table.

    I also don’t think the jobs news is really good news, and while it may not hurt Obama I don’t think it is going to give him some kind of huge bounce.

    This election is going to be close with regards to the popular vote, but I think Obama has an cakewalk when it comes to the electoral college.

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 1 Thumb down 1

  16. KariQ says:

    @Smooth Jazz:

    One problem is, Rasmussen isn’t including cell phone only voters and not only are they more Dem-leaning than those with landline phones, they are also a growing segment of the population.

    Was Ras the most accurate? Well, here’s RCP for 2008: http://www.realclearpolitics.com/epolls/2008/president/national.html

    Looks to me like Ipsos/McClatchy and CNN got it right on the button. Ras was close, but no different than Pew got the exact same number as Rasmussen. If you’re going with that “most accurate” argument, then you need to accept Ipsos, CNN, and Pew on equal footing.

    I also suggest, before relying too heavily on Rasmussen’s state polling accuracy, you check their final poll of Ohio in 2008 against the actual results. Obama won Ohio by 4.5 points. Rasmussen’s final poll in Ohio showed a tie.

    But you notice something else about those final polls? Virtually all of them are within about 1 point of the final. At that point “most accurate” is really splitting hairs. At the beginning of October, roughly the same time frame as where we are now, the polls ranged from O +3 to O +11.

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