9-11 REPORT

Fred Kaplan has a good quickie analysis of the Congressional report on 9-11. The most telling finding–one of little surprise to those of us who pay attention to bureaucratic politics–was that the interagency process and lack of attention to non-core functions within the intelligence agencies was a huge problem.

It should be emphasized, however, that nothing here is evidence that the 9-11 attacks would have been thwarted by more efficient bureaucracy. But major reform has been a long time coming.

FILED UNDER: Terrorism
James Joyner
About James Joyner
James Joyner is Professor and Department Head of Security Studies at Marine Corps University's Command and Staff College and a nonresident senior fellow at the Scowcroft Center for Strategy and Security at the Atlantic Council. He's a former Army officer and Desert Storm vet. Views expressed here are his own. Follow James on Twitter @DrJJoyner.

9-11 REPORT

The Joint House-Senate Intelligence Committee report on 9-11 is available in PDF form.

(Hat tip: Kris)

FILED UNDER: Terrorism
James Joyner
About James Joyner
James Joyner is Professor and Department Head of Security Studies at Marine Corps University's Command and Staff College and a nonresident senior fellow at the Scowcroft Center for Strategy and Security at the Atlantic Council. He's a former Army officer and Desert Storm vet. Views expressed here are his own. Follow James on Twitter @DrJJoyner.

Comments

  1. Chris says:

    I read through the findings and this is the sentence that stuck out for me:

    The United States persisted in observing the rule of law and accepted norms of international behavior, but Bin Ladin and al-Qa’ida recognized no rules and thrived in the safe haven provided by Afghanistan

  2. I think we should have a “fill in the redacted material” contest for the report.

    My entry: replace every instance of [—] with “Saudi Arabia” and you probably will get a pretty good approximation of the classified version of the report.