Attorney General Retorts to Angry Presidential Tweet

Yet another top appointee is in the awkward position of having to defend himself from the Tweeter-in-Chief.

WSJ (“Jeff Sessions Fires Back at Trump Over Handling of Justice Department Surveillance Probe“):

Jeff Sessions fired back Wednesday at criticism from President Donald Trump, saying in a statement that “as long as I am the Attorney General, I will continue to discharge my duties with integrity and honor.”

Mr. Sessions’s statement came hours after Mr. Trump chastised his attorney general’s decision to refer a probe of the Justice Department’s handling of secret surveillance warrants to the agency’s inspector general rather than another office.

“Why is A.G. Jeff Sessions asking the Inspector General to investigate potentially massive FISA abuse. Will take forever, has no prosecutorial power…Why not use Justice Department lawyers? DISGRACEFUL!” Mr. Trump said.

The tweet followed a disclosure by Mr. Sessions on Tuesday that the Justice Department’s inspector general, Michael Horowitz, would investigate how the FBI and federal prosecutors obtained warrants from the nation’s secret spy court to spy on a former Trump campaign foreign-policy adviser who had previously been targeted by Russian intelligence for recruitment.

I honestly can’t recall anything like this, where a President and top appointees are constantly bickering with one another in this fashion. Sessions is, of course, right here: investigations have to be seen to be impartial, not influenced by the President’s mood swings.

FILED UNDER: Law and the Courts, US Politics
James Joyner
About James Joyner
James Joyner is a Security Studies professor at Marine Corps University's Command and Staff College and a nonresident senior fellow at the Scowcroft Center for Strategy and Security at the Atlantic Council. He's a former Army officer and Desert Storm vet. Views expressed here are his own. Follow James on Twitter @DrJJoyner.

Comments

  1. reid says:

    Sessions was one of the earliest Trump supporters, for some bizarre reason. I hope he’s seriously regretting it now. No sympathy here.




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  2. Mark Ivey says:

    “I honestly can’t recall anything like this, where a President and top appointees are constantly bickering with one another in this fashion.”

    It’s called “MA-GAing” and they claim it makes Merica great again.




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  3. al-Ameda says:

    Jeff, the solution is simple:
    resign and go to work in Sean Hannity’s mail room.




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  4. Kathy says:

    So about this GOP civil war all Republicans denied could ever happen…




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  5. James Pearce says:

    Trump shouldn’t be in the White House. He should be on the View.




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  6. gVOR08 says:

    Sessions is, of course, right here

    Sessions fears entangling himself in Trumpsky’s obstruction of justice. That he’s trying to distance himself is hopefully a sign he sees things are going to come to a head soon.




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  7. Neil Hudelson says:

    At least Kissinger and Nixon had the decency to bicker in private.




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  8. James Pearce says:

    I honestly can’t recall anything like this, where a President and top appointees are constantly bickering with one another in this fashion.

    “We need a businessman in the White House,” they said.




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  9. They Saved Nixon's Brain says:

    I guess I could have been even more despicable than I was.




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  10. CSK says:

    @gVOR08:

    And now Hope Hicks is running for the exit.




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  11. Lounsbury says:

    @James Pearce:
    They got instead a carnival huckster and corner-of-the-pub-ranter pretending to be businessman.




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  12. al-Ameda says:

    @Lounsbury:
    @James Pearce:

    “We need a businessman in the White House,” they said.

    By traditional standards Trump has never operated his company like a traditional corporate business, he’s never had to answer to anyone for his actions.

    He’s almost like a start-up – always looking for the next round of financing to leverage his business into more growth, more income. He uses bankruptcy to get out of failed business ventures, to avoid honoring contracts, to manage cash flow.

    His skill is in promoting himself as a ‘successful businessman,’ the reality is that he’s actually a ‘successful salesman/conman.’




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  13. michael reynolds says:

    @al-Ameda:
    Smart businessmen also don’t raise funds by laundering money from the Russian mob. And then put themselves at the center of the world’s biggest spotlight. As a rule your better class of criminal knows not to attract attention to their criminal activities.




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  14. Kylopod says:

    @reid:

    Sessions was one of the earliest Trump supporters, for some bizarre reason. I hope he’s seriously regretting it now. No sympathy here.

    I see anyone who works for Trump as being like a Bond supervillain henchman; it’s only a matter of time before he feeds you to the frickin’ sharks with frickin’ laser beams.

    It’s one of the few areas of Schadenfreude I can depend on during the Trump era.




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  15. Just 'nutha ig'nint cracker says:

    @michael reynolds:

    And then put themselves at the center of the world’s biggest spotlight.

    Well as what’s his name’s (how quickly I forget) book noted, nobody in the group thought they were going to win. They should have thought out the contingencies better, I admit, but still…

    You are right, though, as criminal enterprises go this one made a huuuuuuuge rookie mistake.




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  16. MarkedMan says:

    @James Pearce:

    He should be on the View.

    More like Jerry Springer. Or the modern equivalent.




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