Posts by Steven L. Taylor

Steven L. Taylor
About Steven L. Taylor
Steven L. Taylor is Professor of Political Science and Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences at Troy University. His main areas of expertise include parties, elections, and the institutional design of democracies. His most recent book is the co-authored A Different Democracy: American Government in a 31-Country Perspective. He earned his Ph.D. from the University of Texas and his BA from the University of California, Irvine. He has been blogging since 2003 (originally at the now defunct Poliblog). Follow Steven on Twitter

Reflections on the Panama Canal

The Canal made a number of impressions.

The Irony is Powerful with this one

Apparently, not the Onion.

A Quote to Ponder (Partisanship and Governance Edition)

A bit of musing on parties, elections, and governance,

Institutions 101 and the Sequester

Institutional dynamics in the US constitutional system are the key to undertstanding our current predicament.

One Metric of the Size of Government

Looking at civilian employment in the executive branch since 1940.

Let Them Eat Horse

Trying to Understand Benghazi!

A theory on why Benghazi will not die as a political issue.

Guns to Protect us from Sharia

Silly things members of Congress say (plus musings on authoritarianism).

No, Madison was not an Advocate of the Original Design of the Senate (17th Amendment Repeal Edition)

If one is going to worship at the alter of original intent, it might be useful to know a bit of history.

The GOP’s Ongoing Bush Problem

Pretending like the Bush administration never happened is a problem for the GOP.

Guns and Self-Protection

Some musing on guns: who uses them, how, and why.

Fidel Votes

Socialism Watch

Fake Space Monkey?

Immigration Trends

Further Evidence Limbaugh Should be Ignored on Immigration

Really, more evidence he should be ignored in general.

Coca, Cocaine, and Cola

Plus some thoughts on prohibitionist policies (because sometimes a Quick Pick grows in the making).

How Liberal is President Obama?

Looking at the data? Not very.

Polarization in the Congress

Congress is historically polarized.