Gipper U

WaPo: Supporters Push Ronald Reagan University

On the silver screen, he was a college football hero and a cheerleader. He played cadets at two different military academies. He appeared as a zoology professor in the Hollywood classic “Bedtime for Bonzo.” But now America’s only movie-star-turned-president may have another dramatic role in higher education: as the namesake and inspiration for Ronald Reagan University.

Backers of the ambitious plan to build a private university outside Denver that would focus on the former president’s economic and diplomatic principles asked the Colorado legislature this week to endorse the idea. With a 200-acre campus site donated by a prominent Colorado Republican, the plans call for construction to begin next year and a student body of 10,000 to be in classes before the end of the decade.

“We have worked with an architect, and we think we’re looking at an $850 million construction budget,” said Terry Walker, a former professor and administrator at the University of Louisiana who is serving as founding president of the proposed school. “We are planning for a full-scale university, with a law school, business school and a graduate school of foreign affairs and public policy. We also want a performing arts school, to reflect the president’s long movie career.”

Well, goodness knows we suffer from a lack of universities and, especially, law schools, people trained in the humanities, and performance artists. And, of course, when I think of Denver, “Ronald Reagan” is the first thing that comes to mind.

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James Joyner
About James Joyner
James Joyner is Professor and Department Head of Security Studies at Marine Corps University's Command and Staff College and a nonresident senior fellow at the Scowcroft Center for Strategy and Security at the Atlantic Council. He's a former Army officer and Desert Storm vet. Views expressed here are his own. Follow James on Twitter @DrJJoyner.

Comments

  1. Mark Hasty says:

    And brand new, unaccredited universities have no trouble attracting 10,000 students in their first decade of operation.