GOP Reaffirms Opposition To Same-Sex Marriage

Not surprisingly, the Republican National Committee has reaffirmed the party’s opposition to same-sex marriage:

The Republican National Committee passed resolutions Friday reaffirming its commitment to defining marriage as between a man and a woman, and calling on the Supreme Court to “uphold the sanctity of marriage” as it weighs rulings on two landmark cases involving gay marriage.

At the RNC’s spring meeting in Los Angeles, committee members adopted a slate of resolutions unanimously and without discussion, a committee spokeswoman said.

One of the resolutions affirms the committee’s “support for marriage as the union of one man and one woman, and as the optimum environment in which to raise healthy children for the future of America.”

Another involves the Supreme Court, which recently heard arguments in two cases involving gay marriage. One case involves California’s same-sex marriage ban, while the other involves the federal Defense Of Marriage Act, which prevents same-sex married couples from receiving certain federal benefits.

“The Republican National Committee implores the U. S. Supreme Court to uphold the sanctity of marriage in its rulings on California’s Proposition 8 and the Federal Defense of Marriage Act,” reads the RNC’s resolution.

Like I said, this isn’t a surprise at all. While public opinion has shifted in favor of marriage equality, the base of the GOP remains heavily against it. At some point, reality is likely going to force the GOP to reassess its position on this issue, especially as more Republican officeholders come out in favor of same-sex marriage, but that day is still some time off.

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Doug Mataconis
About Doug Mataconis
Doug holds a B.A. in Political Science from Rutgers University and J.D. from George Mason University School of Law. He joined the staff of OTB in May 2010. Before joining OTB, he wrote at Below The BeltwayThe Liberty Papers, and United Liberty Follow Doug on Twitter | Facebook

Comments

  1. Mikey says:

    At some point, reality is likely going to force the GOP to reassess its position on this issue, especially as more Republican officeholders come out in favor of same-sex marriage, but that day is still some time off.

    Exactly how long it will take could probably be determined using actuarial tables…

  2. michael reynolds says:

    Have they endorsed the vote for women yet?

  3. jd says:

    They still have a wrench caught in their moral compass.

  4. edmondo says:

    All that money for an Outreach Program — pissed away!

  5. george says:

    I would have thought that if the sanctity of traditional marriage was a big deal for them, they’d go after the divorce laws. Probably only about 5% of the population might be involved in gay marriage, but something like 50% are involved in divorce. Of course, that might prove embarrassing, considering how many high level GOP’ers (including Reagan) have been divorced. A cynic might suspect that they’re being selective about their outrage for a reason …

    Having said that, I’ve yet to hear a reason that gay marriages don’t fit under the “sanctified” theme in any case – other than homophobia, of course. Sanctity has to do with holding to vows, not who is making them.

  6. Jeremy R says:

    At some point, reality is likely going to force the GOP to reassess its position on this issue, especially as more Republican officeholders come out in favor of same-sex marriage, but that day is still some time off.

    I imagine how soon that point comes will be heavily influenced by how long the parts of their coalition that favor marriage equality continue to sacrifice it at the altar of political expediency, when going to vote.

  7. stonetools says:

    Like I said, this isn’t a surprise at all. While public opinion has shifted in favor of marriage equality, the base of the GOP remains heavily against it. At some point, reality is likely going to force the GOP to reassess its position on this issue, especially as more Republican officeholders come out in favor of same-sex marriage, but that day is still some time off.

    Until the GOP suffers a couple of massive electoral defeats, it’s not going to “see reality” on this issue, no matter what Log Cabin Republicans or libertarians want.

    Let’s face it, a vote for Republicans is a vote against gay rights and marriage equality, for the foreseeable future. Want to help gays and support marriage equality, vote Democrat, no ifs, ands, or buts.
    Your court.

  8. Electroman says:

    Yes, we can almost see the spittle forming in the corners of their hate-twisted mouths. I was a Republican for 35 years and all I got was this lousy hate group.

  9. grumpy realist says:

    Why does this remind me of George Wallace bellowing: “segregation now, segregation tomorrow, segregation forEVER!!!”

  10. anjin-san says:

    I am starting to really like the idea of Hillary mopping the floor with these folks in 2016…

  11. In 30 years, Rand Paul’s son will be giving speeches about how the GOP was always a champion of GLBT rights and it was really only the Democrats who were against it.

  12. Jenos Idanian #13 says:

    They’re wrong, and they’ll pay for being wrong. There’s probably enough momentum to keep this in the platform for 2016, but I strongly suspect it’ll be conspicuously absent by 2020.

  13. Tsar Nicholas says:

    Democrats Reaffirm Support of Late-Term Abortions, Notwithstanding Gosnell’s Grisly Atrocities

    Democrats Reaffirm Support of Obamacare, Notwithstanding Skyrocketing Costs of Health Insurance Premiums, Mass Layoffs and Forced Switches to Part-Time Work

    Obviously this is the wrong crowd for that kind of stuff, and the dots won’t be connected, no matter how obvious, but still they’re worth mentioning. If for no other reason the irony.

    Regarding same-sex marriages, it’s not at all surprising the national GOP apparatus has taken this stance. Theirs is a weird collection of evangelicals and country clubbers. The support both of Prop. 8 (states’ rights) and simultaneously DOMA (anti-states’ rights) is oxymoronic, but endemic to the peculiar demographics of the GOP establishment.

    But the politics of all this wouldn’t necessitate the GOP doing anything else. Republicans don’t lose elections because of the issue of same-sex marriage. Republicans when they lose elections do so because of lock step voting by pure racial identity and tribal party identity. Let’s not confuse the Internet, the media, and colleges and universities, with the actual voting electorate.

    Perhaps the greatest irony is that ultimately this issue won’t be an issue. We’re talking here about a micro demographic. Then in 20-30 years we’ll be talking about a micro demographic that doesn’t actually want marriage anymore. Can you fathom what the divorce rate will be among gays and lesbians? 60%? 70%? And just wait until the ton of bricks of community property, partitions, property settlements, alimony, forced sales, will contests, forced short sales, etc., hit home. Mountains currently are being moved for a molehill made out of dust in the wind.

  14. grumpy realist says:

    @Tsar Nicholas: The exact same argument could have been leveled at people who wanted interracial marriages.

    Didn’t stop the Supreme Court from declaring bans against it UNCONSTITUTIONAL.

  15. Sejanus says:

    @grumpy realist: I remember saying to him the same thing in another thread. He didn’t bother to reply then and I don’t expect to see him replying to you either. He’s a drive by commentator, posting his repetitive jiber jabber over and over again and then not bothering to reply to the thorough refutations that always follow.

  16. Davebo says:

    @Sejanus:

    Think Hitchhikers guide to the galaxy and peril sensitive sunglasses.

    If a point is thoroughly refuted but you didn’t respond did it ever really happen?