HAPPY NEW YEAR

It’s now 2004 in the Eastern Time Zone.

I’m with Bob Tagorda (see previous post) on this one. I’ve done the countdown to midnight thing for a goodly number of these now. Some have been quite memorable. Others have long since faded.

NYT fronts this picture:


New Year in Paris
People celebrating the New Year at the Champs Elysees in Paris.

I did that for New Year 1990. New Year 1991 was Somewhere in Saudi Arabia. I’ve done New Year abroad ten times, done new decades four times, and even a new millenium. I’ve watched the clock turn midnight while at parties, in a Humvee, and just sitting around at home. I broke up with a girl during a particularly bad New Year’s Eve party and started a pretty good relationship with a New Year’s Eve date the very next year. Now, I’ve even blogged a New Year.

FILED UNDER: Popular Culture
James Joyner
About James Joyner
James Joyner is Professor and Department Head of Security Studies at Marine Corps University's Command and Staff College and a nonresident senior fellow at the Scowcroft Center for Strategy and Security at the Atlantic Council. He's a former Army officer and Desert Storm vet. Views expressed here are his own. Follow James on Twitter @DrJJoyner.

Comments

  1. Wizbang says:

    Blogging The New Year
    James Joyner describes a boatload of New Years celebrations at points international, and notes that he’s now blogged New Years Eve. I sort of blogged on New Years Eve. Actually we spent the first part of the evening with a…

  2. Auld Lang Syne
    Unlike James, my New Years memories have no international flavour to linger over. New Years generally places my mood somewhere between ambilivent and “take a long drive in the garage” depressed. When I was younger it seemed I was inevitably…

  3. PoliBlog says:

    The Faux Holiday?
    New Year’s Eve is getting a big thumbs down in the Blogosphere, as James Joyner, Kevin Alyward, Robert Tagorda, and Stephen Bainbridge all note that the holiday is basically anti-climactic, and really, nothing more than the celebration of the clock…