It’s Too Late For Republican ‘Regrets’ About Trump, They Made Their Choice.

Polls are starting to show that the number of Republicans embarrassed by the President's rhetoric and behavior is rising. Sorry guys, it's too late now. You broke it, you bought it.

President Trump’s bombastic rhetoric, Twitter habits, and attacks on perceived enemies appear to be having an impact on at least some Republicans who say that they are increasingly embarrassed by the President’s behavior:

I noticed something watching President Trump’s official 2020 campaign launch on Tuesday night that I have noticed before. Oftentimes when Trump goes for applause lines in speeches, people applaud. But sometimes, they laugh. It’s not like a “that was funny” laugh; it’s more like a “I know that was ridiculous, but I’m in on the joke” laugh. And occasionally, it’s sort of a nervous, “that might have crossed the line” laugh.

And a new poll suggests there’s something to that.

The Pew survey shows that a majority of Republicans and GOP-leaning voters say they are at least sometimes “embarrassed” (53 percent) and “concerned” (59 percent) about the things Trump says.

Large numbers also say they are at least sometimes “exhausted” (41 percent), “angry” (37 percent) and “insulted” (32 percent). Twenty-two percent say they are sometimes “frightened” by Trump’s comments

The numbers are basically unprecedented. Pollsters have asked in the past whether people are embarrassed by Trump, but the numbers haven’t been as high. A February 2017 McClatchy-Marist College poll showed that 12 percent of Republicans said they were embarrassed by Trump’s conduct, for instance. Other polls have asked whether people are “proud” or “embarrassed” of Trump, and Republicans overwhelmingly pick “proud.”

But those questions were binary, in which Republicans, perhaps understandably, chose the Trump side. Pew appears to have elicited people’s true feelings by asking a more nuanced question. And given the choice between “often,” “sometimes,” “rarely” and “never,” many Republicans choose at least “sometimes.”

While this phenomenon is interesting, I would suggest that it hardly means anything beausse there is hardly any indication that these Republicans who are “embarrassed” by the President are going to do anything about it. We saw similar numbers during the race for the Republican nomination, of course, during which many Republicans and conservatives spoke out against Trump and his bombastic and offensive rhetoric and actions. In the end, though, with only relatively speaking small number hardcore “Never Trump” Republicans and conservatives who remain critical of Trump, the vast majority of these people lined up enthusiastically behind him once he became their party’s nominee. As the General Election campaign dragged on and his behavior, such as the attacks on a GOld Star mother and father, the Access Hollywood tape, and the accusations by nearly two dozen women regarding actions by Trump that can be classified as sexual harassment or even assault, became public these people stood behind Trump, voted for him, and cheered on Election Day when he defied the odds and won the election.

Since he officially became President, there has been even less dissent from these supposedly embarrassed Republicans, and those Republicans and conservatives who have spoken out have been the subject unrelenting attacks from the sycophants, sellouts, and cowards who know that there’s something wrong with this President but refuse to do anything about it.

At various points since President Trump began his run for the Presidency — most notably here, here, here, and here, I have noted that Republicans had a choice to make. They could either stand up for the principles and ideals that they claimed to support, or they could throw those principles away and put their support behind Trump. Over the past two and a half years, the vast majority of those Republicans and conservatives made their choice. The GOP is now the Party of Trump. Now, they have to live with it.

There’s still a chance for them to make up for all of this, of course, but it would require a combination of political and personal courage that the current Republican Party appears to lack. It would require more people to be like Justin Amash and say that enough is enough, that this President’s poisonous rhetoric, disdain for the Rule of Law and Freedom of the Press, his horrible treatment of loyal allies, and his coddling of dictators, and the extent to which he has stoked the fires of racial and ethnic prejudice to gain political power are beyond the pale. And it would perhaps require them to sacrifice political power for the good of the nation to ensure that this man does not serve a second term as President.

Does anyone actually believe they’ll do any of this?

Of course they won’t. They’ve made their bed with Trump, now they have to accept it and the consequences that will inevitably follow.

FILED UNDER: Donald Trump, Politicians, US Politics,
Doug Mataconis
About Doug Mataconis
Doug holds a B.A. in Political Science from Rutgers University and J.D. from George Mason University School of Law. He joined the staff of OTB in May 2010. Before joining OTB, he wrote at Below The BeltwayThe Liberty Papers, and United Liberty Follow Doug on Twitter | Facebook

Comments

  1. Barry says:

    In addition, long before Trump is in even minor danger from a primary challenger, he’d be guaranteed to lose the general.

    Incumbent presidents can’t realistically be challenged in their primary.

  2. Daryl and his brother Darryl says:

    Why in the world would anyone be embarrassed by a rapist with a fake tan, fake teeth, and a shitty comb-over, putting kids in cages, falling in love with a short fat Korean Dough-Boy, and basically fuqing up everything he touches?

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  3. DrDaveT says:

    It would require more people to be like Justin Amash

    Sadly, if everyone in the GOP were like Justin Amash, the party would still be horrible, and horrible for America. Differently horrible, but horrible nevertheless.

    Perhaps we should call it the Rand Paul effect: the only Republicans with any independence are the ones who were already dangerously misguided.

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  4. SenyorDave says:

    Slightly OT, but I find it interesting that the detention camp issue appears to have real legs. I think even some of Trump’s less deranged supporters (that’s on a relative scale) find it a little disturbing. Unlike the rape allegation, they can’t just dismiss it out of hand as a fabrication.

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  5. Kathy says:

    I’ve been thinking lately that the big problem with Dennison is that he’s utterly shameless. I mean this literally: he has no shame.

    Look, most men confronted with an accusation of terrible behavior, which they know they’re guilty of, would appear or feel guilty and ashamed, even if only at the prospect of what adverse consequences they might face, or at being exposed.

    With El Cheeto it doesn’t work that way. He’s not ashamed. He doesn’t feel any guilt. And knowing most of his supporters won’t even care, he can just blow it off as if it were nothing. Then he can attack any accuser, and victimize them again.

    I wonder, too, whether he’s a functional solipsist. I don’t mean he literally believes he alone exists, but close: only he matters.

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  6. Gustopher says:

    @SenyorDave: and the latest talking point is that it is the Democrat’s fault, so they understand that concentration camps are bad.

    Of course, if it was really the Democrats fault for not adequately funding the concentration camps, the Trump administration wouldn’t be trying to hide the conditions inside their concentration camps so much. They would be doing guided tours of Fox News, angry that congress won’t give them funding to put children in smaller, individual cages.

    And for the $700/day cost of detaining each kid, we could get each of those kids a live-in housekeeper, let alone soap and a toothbrush.

    Hmm. Concentration camps running low on soap. I wonder if there’s a historical example that can solve that problem… I’ve thought about this, and all I can finally say is that I can see no solution that would not sound shrill.

  7. Joe says:

    Perhaps many Republicans will be less enthusiastic about voting to re-elect Trump, but that choice will still be binary and I am sure they can come up with an excuse that he’s still better than [fill in the blank], Democrat.

  8. Matt says:

    Once Trump is shown to be a loser support for him will plummet and suddenly a whole lot of Republicans will be of the kind that never supported Trump…

    Even if Trump is re-elected I have a feeling he’ll receive similar treatment to Bush Jr once he departs the office.

  9. DrDaveT says:

    @Kathy:

    I wonder, too, whether he’s a functional solipsist. I don’t mean he literally believes he alone exists, but close: only he matters.

    Isn’t that the definition of a sociopath?

  10. Daryl and his brother Darryl says:

    @Matt:

    Once Trump is shown to be a loser

    Semantics, but I think fraud is a better way to go. Everything about him is fraudulent; from his tan to his fortune to his deal-making ability. If I were running against him I would hit that, at every opportunity, to show how he is conning everyone. Explain the fraud, explain the best solution to the problem, and then point out the fraud again. e.g., NoKo…Dennison is trying to fool you when he says he solved the nuclear danger, what he actually did was play into Kim’s hands. What we should be doing, and what I will do is x. But Dennison did y, and so his solution is not a solution at all, but a fraud.

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  11. An Interested Party says:
  12. steve says:

    All that stuff Republicans used to say about character mattering, that a good leader could strike a deal with the other party, that competence matters? That was all BS. It is all about power. It is about pissing off the libs. You are correct, they will vote for Trump no matter what he does with most of them declaring that Trump is the best president we have ever had.

    Steve

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  13. lynn says:

    @DrDaveT: asks about the definition of a sociopath:

    Glibness and Superficial Charm

    Manipulative and Conning
    They never recognize the rights of others and see their self-serving behaviors as permissible. They appear to be charming, yet are covertly hostile and domineering, seeing their victim as merely an instrument to be used. They may dominate and humiliate their victims.

    Grandiose Sense of Self
    Feels entitled to certain things as “their right.”

    Pathological Lying
    Has no problem lying coolly and easily and it is almost impossible for them to be truthful on a consistent basis. Can create, and get caught up in, a complex belief about their own powers and abilities. Extremely convincing and even able to pass lie detector tests.

    Lack of Remorse, Shame or Guilt
    A deep seated rage, which is split off and repressed, is at their core. Does not see others around them as people, but only as targets and opportunities. Instead of friends, they have victims and accomplices who end up as victims. The end always justifies the means and they let nothing stand in their way.

    Shallow Emotions
    When they show what seems to be warmth, joy, love and compassion it is more feigned than experienced and serves an ulterior motive. Outraged by insignificant matters, yet remaining unmoved and cold by what would upset a normal person. Since they are not genuine, neither are their promises.

    Incapacity for Love

    Need for Stimulation
    Living on the edge. Verbal outbursts and physical punishments are normal. Promiscuity and gambling are common.

    Callousness/Lack of Empathy
    Unable to empathize with the pain of their victims, having only contempt for others’ feelings of distress and readily taking advantage of them.

    Poor Behavioral Controls/Impulsive Nature
    Rage and abuse, alternating with small expressions of love and approval produce an addictive cycle for abuser and abused, as well as creating hopelessness in the victim. Believe they are all-powerful, all-knowing, entitled to every wish, no sense of personal boundaries, no concern for their impact on others.

    Early Behavior Problems/Juvenile Delinquency
    Usually has a history of behavioral and academic difficulties, yet “gets by” by conning others. Problems in making and keeping friends; aberrant behaviors such as cruelty to people or animals, stealing, etc.

    Irresponsibility/Unreliability
    Not concerned about wrecking others’ lives and dreams. Oblivious or indifferent to the devastation they cause. Does not accept blame themselves, but blames others, even for acts they obviously committed.

    Promiscuous Sexual Behavior/Infidelity
    Promiscuity, child sexual abuse, rape and sexual acting out of all sorts.

    Lack of Realistic Life Plan/Parasitic Lifestyle
    Tends to move around a lot or makes all encompassing promises for the future, poor work ethic but exploits others effectively.

    Criminal or Entrepreneurial Versatility
    Changes their image as needed to avoid prosecution. Changes life story readily.

  14. Matt says:

    @Daryl and his brother Darryl: I wasn’t nearly as clear as I should of been when I said that. I meant that if Trump loses re-election and thus becomes a loser. He is a fraud a huckster a carnival barker and the true believers refuse to see it. A good chunk of people who voted for him in 2016 and are reachable have already had their eyes opened since then. We just need to reach the rest.

    Granted I’m basing this on a small sample size composing of trumpaloons and former trumpsters that I know personally.

  15. DrDaveT says:

    A useful question to ask Trump supporters: hypothetically, what discovery about Trump or action by Trump would be sufficient for you to stop supporting him?

  16. Liberal Capitalist says:

    Here is the challenge:

    When an informed American attempts to talk to an uninformed American (ie: Fox News Viewer) and point out the gross examples of fraud and incompetence their retort is: “Yeah, well, they ALL suck”.

    As if by painting the body politic with that broad brush somehow negates the examples and removes all the Trump flaws.

    They will tick the [R] box come election time, without question.

    The GOP will, of course, have lost the center that gave Trump the benefit of the doubt in 2016. The jobs didn’t come back, more were lost, healthcare didn’t get fixed, and they didn’t get tire of winning… hey they didn’t even know when (or if) the winning began at all.

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  17. Liberal Capitalist says:

    @DrDaveT:

    A useful question to ask Trump supporters: hypothetically, what discovery about Trump or action by Trump would be sufficient for you to stop supporting him?

    Actually, asked and answered on SNL:
    https://mashable.com/video/snl-meet-the-press-what-would-it-take-donald-trump/

  18. grumpy realist says:

    Anyone been following the legal soap opera of Duncan Hunter, grifter extraordinaire?

    Boy you sure can pick them, California…..

  19. Scott O says:

    @DrDaveT:
    “A useful question to ask Trump supporters: hypothetically, what discovery about Trump or action by Trump would be sufficient for you to stop supporting him?”

    Here’s a hypothetical. Donald announces that he has been addicted to prescription medication and is seeking treatment. The assholes wouldn’t care about that of course. But as part of a 12 step program he starts calling people, Elizabeth Warren, Hillary, etc. to apologize for his past behavior. That might do it.

  20. OzarkHillbilly says:

    @lynn: You’ve met my ex wife? You seem to know her very well.

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  21. Sarah Hudson says:

    I just wonder who is going to vote for him next time. Absurd.

  22. wr says:

    @grumpy realist: “Boy you sure can pick them, California…..”

    That would be California Republicans. California Democrats are doing quite well with representatives like Adam Schiff, Eric Swalwell, Maxine Waters and so many others…

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  23. grumpy realist says:

    @wr: Well of course. This is the same population that elected Bob Dornan and produced Orly Taitz. And I think that Mr. Used Car Salesman is trying to get back into office? Orange County, known for its batsh*t republicans.

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  24. michael reynolds says:

    @Kathy: @lynn:
    Bingo. Like I said from day one: a stupid psychopath. Excellent predatory instincts, completely amoral, utterly incapable of empathy, narcissistic, profoundly ignorant, weak, needy and thank God for all of us: fckin’ stoopid. Basically a shark, both in behavior and in brain size. A big orange slab of nasty and dumb, which is why he appeals to Evangelical Christians, bitter old white men with too many guns, Klansmen, creeps who can’t get laid, cowards and weaklings.

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  25. Teve says:

    “A useful question to ask Trump supporters: hypothetically, what discovery about Trump or action by Trump would be sufficient for you to stop supporting him?”

    monetary reparations for all people of color who had their rights violated by the government, paid for by a gasoline tax.

    They’d be burning him in effigy by nightfall.

  26. The abyss that is the soul of cracker says:

    There’s still a chance for them to make up for all of this, of course, but it would require a combination of political and personal courage that the current Republican Party appears to lack. It would require more people to be like Justin Amash and say that enough is enough, that this President’s poisonous rhetoric, disdain for the Rule of Law and Freedom of the Press, his horrible treatment of loyal allies, and his coddling of dictators, and the extent to which he has stoked the fires of racial and ethnic prejudice to gain political power are beyond the pale. And it would perhaps require them to sacrifice political power for the good of the nation to ensure that this man does not serve a second term as President.

    Sadly, the thing that is missing from that list it “changing what they believe about the world and what they are willing to do to secure their vision.” The race baiting, voodoo economics, tilting the game to favor the already rich, opposition to social and economic mobility (while criticizing the poor for being “to lazy to work hard”), opposition to workable reforms in healthcare and immigration, neocon “nation building,” mindless and reflexive support for Israeli zionism, fealty to KSA, and such all gets to stay.

    From that standpoint, it really is amazing that no one will step up. Throwing Trump under the bus is virtually cost free. Mitch and the boyz must really be gutless.

  27. Just nutha ignint cracker says:

    @Gustopher:

    Hmm. Concentration camps running low on soap. I wonder if there’s a historical example that can solve that problem… I’ve thought about this, and all I can finally say is that I can see no solution that would not sound shrill.

    Or pitch you headlong into Godwin Land. I empathize with your frustration and feel your pain.

  28. Eugene Pistorese says:

    @Scott O:

    But as part of a 12 step program he starts calling people, Elizabeth Warren, Hillary, etc. to apologize for his past behavior. That might do it.

    Or more likely

    At least he has the decency to apologize when he realizes he was wrong. Not like Hillary with her emails and foundation, or Obama taking over 20% (Joyner’s new number) of the economy and disrespecting Americans, or Warren lying about her heritage so that she could jump ahead of someone else for a job she didn’t deserve, or…

  29. Scott O says:

    @Eugene Pistorese: You do not live in the real world.

  30. Just nutha ignint cracker says:

    @Scott O: You’re right, I live in Red State America in a small county in Southwest Washington. The 2 cities across the river from each other have a total population of under 60.000 where 94% of the adult population is registered to vote and 69% of them voted Republican 2016. Even more in the recent mid term. But I do read comments similar to the one I wrote in the newspaper almost every day. Where do you live?

  31. Scott O says:

    @Just nutha ignint cracker: Central Oregon coast, Lincoln County. It’s rural, population about 50k but moderately blue politically. Are you Eugene Pistorese? Same avatar. I guess your comment was satire?

  32. greenlibertarian says:

    Trump is the greatest President that has served in my lifetime. He is doing the country a good turn. Time to purge the Bolsheviks from government, destroy the deep state, and return to a system of free and fair trade, which means peace. Trump wakes America out of its asinine postmodern stew of political/social identities (some of which are mental illness, e.g., transgenderism and some socialized homosexuality), multiculturalism (a ruse for any cultural value must be accepted), diversity (a ruse to elevate some groups while targeting another for diminishment), and the anti-science of academia, particularly the social sciences. Trump is not an embarrassment, he is as rational as the sun rising and the sun setting, the rise of America and the setting of Bolshevism.