King Tut Not Murdered

Tests Show King Tut Was Not Murdered (AP)

The results of a CT scan done on King Tut’s mummy indicate the boy king was not murdered, but may have suffered a badly broken leg shortly before his death at age 19 — a wound that could have become infected, Egypt’s top archaeologist said Tuesday. Zahi Hawass, secretary general if the Supreme Council of Antiquities, announced the results of the CT scan about two months after it was performed on Tut’s mummy.

Hawass said the remains of Tutankhamun, who ruled about 3,300 years ago, showed no signs that he had been murdered — dispelling a mystery that has long surrounded the pharaoh’s death. “In answer to theories that Tutankhamun was murdered, the team found no evidence for a blow to the back of the head, and no other indication of foul play,” according to a statement released by Hawass’ office. “They also found it extremely unlikely that he suffered an accident in which he crushed his chest.”

Hawass told The Associated Press that, despite ruling out the theory that Tut was killed violently, he had no idea how the king actually died.

Talk about your cold cases.

FILED UNDER: Middle East, Science & Technology
James Joyner
About James Joyner
James Joyner is Professor and Department Head of Security Studies at Marine Corps University's Command and Staff College and a nonresident senior fellow at the Scowcroft Center for Strategy and Security at the Atlantic Council. He's a former Army officer and Desert Storm vet. Views expressed here are his own. Follow James on Twitter @DrJJoyner.

Comments

  1. McGehee says:

    But what about the grassy knoll?