Neighborhood Residents Getting Fed Up With Occupy Wall Street

It’s beginning to look like the protest at Zucotti Park in New York City is overstaying its welcome:

Infuriated lower Manhattan residents went ballistic on Zuccotti Park protesters at a chaotic Community Board 1 meeting tonight while blasting politicians for allowing the siege to continue without any end in sight.

“They are defecating on our doorsteps,” fumed Catherine Hughes, a member of Community Board 1 and a stay at home mom who has the misfortune of living one block from the chaos. “A lot of people are very frustrated. A lot of people are concerned about the safety of our kids.”

Fed up homeowners said that they’ve been subjected to insults and harassment as they trek to their jobs each morning. “The protesters taunt people who are on their way to work,” said James Fernandez, 51, whose apartment overlooks the park.

(…)

The line to get into the standing room only meeting spilled out of the board’s office and onto the street outside where Zuccotti sympathizers sparred with angry residents. One elderly woman told a protester to stop screaming and was met with an even hgiher volume. “Get some earplugs!” retorted David Spano. “This is the street. I can say whatever I want! I can’t calm down, I’ve been struggling for 30 years!”

Suffice it to say, this is not the way to win friends and influence people.

FILED UNDER: Quick Takes, US Politics,
Doug Mataconis
About Doug Mataconis
Doug holds a B.A. in Political Science from Rutgers University and J.D. from George Mason University School of Law. He joined the staff of OTB in May 2010. Before joining OTB, he wrote at Below The BeltwayThe Liberty Papers, and United Liberty Follow Doug on Twitter | Facebook

Comments

  1. Ben Wolf says:

    They are defecating on our doorsteps

    The city won’t let OWS bring in chemical toilets. Not their fault.

    The protesters taunt people who are on their way to work,” said James Fernandez, 51, whose apartment overlooks the park.

    It’s been six weeks, and yet in a world where recording devices are ubiquitous no one has managed to record OWS “harassment” of people going to work? Are we really supposed to believe this?

  2. JKB says:

    This sums up the protest:

    “The protesters taunt people who are on their way to work,”

  3. Hey Norm says:

    Hey you kids….get off my lawn…

  4. john personna says:

    If the city won’t let in toilets they should at least have some wag-bags on hand for emergencies.

  5. Ben Wolf says:

    Incidentally, it appears Schoen misrepresented the results of his own poll of OWS protestors:

    http://www.capitalnewyork.com/article/culture/2011/10/3790409/survey-many-occupy-wall-street-protesters-are-unhappy-democrats-who-

  6. Hey Norm says:

    Interesting study on how political polarization has paralleled the growth in inequality.
    http://voteview.com/polarizedamerica.asp

  7. john personna says:

    Do most readers understand this backstory?

    Participants in the Occupy Wall Street movement are right to argue that the big banks have never properly been investigated for the mortgage origination, aggregation, and securitization behavior that was central to the financial crisis – and to the loss of more than eight million jobs. But, thanks to the efforts of New York’s attorney general, Eric Schneiderman, and others, serious discussion has started in the United States about an out-of court mortgage settlement between state attorney generals and prominent financial-sector firms.

    But in the aftermath:

    Policymakers can respond in three ways. First, they could do nothing – apparently the preference of the Republican congressional leadership, which recently wrote to Fed Chairman Ben Bernanke to demand that he not try to stimulate the economy further.

    Second, they could continue to rely on conventional monetary and fiscal policy to pull the economy out of the doldrums. This is the approach still preferred by the Obama administration, despite its poor performance.

    Third, we could adopt an alternative approach that directly reduces the value of underwater mortgages. At this point, any improvement in consumer balance sheets would directly stimulate the economy and create jobs.

    It is a bigger story than the poop, even if that did sadly happen.

  8. Ben Wolf says:

    @john personna:

    Third, we could adopt an alternative approach that directly reduces the value of underwater mortgages. At this point, any improvement in consumer balance sheets would directly stimulate the economy and create jobs.

    Unfortunately this would involve government actually doing something, which our libertarian and radical right brethren oppose on principle.

    I’m starting to think those two groups actually hate the private sector, as they continually advocate policies which hurt it. Their insistence on getting rid of public debt, for example: exactly how do they think the private sector will save with minimal risk without federal debt being issued? Doesn’t seem to matter to them, assuming they even understand how saving works.

  9. john personna says:

    A very different take on the protest here (with a good photo essay):

    There are many different views being shared, but the prevailing message is that a few powerful men have corrupted our system and have looted the wealth of the hard working middle class. I saw no one representing the Free Shit Army looking for more handouts. From a demographic viewpoint, this protest is clearly being led by the Millenial Generation. There are no Boomers pulling the strings behind the scenes and calling the shots. George Soros and Jesse Jackson haven’t hijacked the agenda. I would estimate that 60% of the crowd were Millenials, with 20% Gen-X and 20% Baby Boomers. I would estimate that 75% of the crowd was white, with 15% hispanic and 10% black. The stereotypes being portrayed by the MSM get blown out of the water when you see for yourself. A young black guy with a NOBAMA shirt on marched by us holding an End the Fed sign. That was the last thing I thought I would see. Later in the day I was handed a Bernanke buck by a young black man as he described the evils of inflation and the Federal Reserve. Does that sound like what you are hearing on Fox News?

    The anti-Fed theme is seldom reported, perhaps because it is not “liberal” enough?

  10. @john personna:

    Depends. If the poop is on your doorstep, it’s probably a much bigger story than underwater mortgages hundreds of miles away.

  11. Ben Wolf says:

    @john personna: Nice link john, thanks.

  12. john personna says:

    @Stormy Dragon:

    I don’t see [any] traditional “doorsteps” in that photo essay. Does the lady mean outside the lobby of her building? Gross, but given the “extension” of image to “doorstep” I’m not sure how much I can commit to the story.

  13. john personna says:

    Also related:

    Is the SEC colluding with banks on CDO prosecutions?

    (Felix Salmon, reputable source.)

  14. Muffler says:

    The comment related to lack of evidence to support claims is absolutely spot on. What I do find troublesome are Americans angry about other Americans using the right to protest and be heard. You may not agree with them, but that’s not the discussion. The discussion is making sure the right to protest is cherished and understood. These people haven’t shown any violence and except for microscope focus by certain media outlets on events which support their agenda I would say OWS has been pretty tame. I am sure the many residents in Alabama felt the same way in the 60s when MLK protesters were marching.

    I completely support their right to protest, be heard and exert their influence in a peaceful way. Understand that the private space they occupy was a zoned requirement for the developer to have additional building rights.

    In NYC much of the space provided for public use is done by developers in order to build higher or exceed other building regulations. So in some cases to go up higher than the city regulation or to add features the developers are required to provide public space at their expense. The PUBLIC makes a deal with the PRIVATE developer.

    So please if you want to talk about socialism versus capitalism… this is a clear instance where the developer is upset because the public is using property the public traded for so the developer could make a larger profit. Think about that when you feel for the developer.

  15. Muffler says:

    @john personna: Many of the posters here no nothing of NYC and how it is works. They don’t understand NYC public space and they don’t understand large apartment buildings let alone the amount of noise outside of OWS that goes on. They don’t understand that at these community board meetings all kinds of loons show up complaining about something. They complain about kids, dogs, cats, garbage trucks, delivery trucks, landlords, doormen, police, firemen, people upstairs, bars, taxis, noise and pretty much anything you can think of. ANYTHING! So you can take it anyway you want, but it NYC and living here can try your soul daily. OWS is not an issue.

  16. john personna says:

    @Muffler:

    For all we know she’s venting on the original “guy pooping on a police car” photo.

  17. Davebo says:

    Unfortunately this would involve government actually doing something, which our libertarian and radical right brethren oppose on principle.

    Once you accept the fact that there is a difference between these two groups you’ve pretty much given up on reality all together. It’s a distinction Doug would love to point out, but a distinction without a difference.

  18. Ben Wolf says:

    @Davebo: Fair point.