Photos for MLK Day

A friend shared a photo of the MLK statue and it may me remember these, and today is the best day to share them:

MLK

IMG_7189

Both taken June 17, 2015

FILED UNDER: Photography, Quick Takes
Steven L. Taylor
About Steven L. Taylor
Steven L. Taylor is a Professor of Political Science and a College of Arts and Sciences Dean. His main areas of expertise include parties, elections, and the institutional design of democracies. His most recent book is the co-authored A Different Democracy: American Government in a 31-Country Perspective. He earned his Ph.D. from the University of Texas and his BA from the University of California, Irvine. He has been blogging since 2003 (originally at the now defunct Poliblog). Follow Steven on Twitter

Comments

  1. Mister Bluster says:

    test

  2. Mister Bluster says:

    Abraham, Martin and John
    I was 15 in 1963 when John Kennedy was gunned down. Before that Abraham Lincoln’s Birthday was just another day off from school in February in Illinois.
    Malcolm X was killed in February of 1965. Martin Luther King was shot dead three years later and then Robert Kennedy was the victim of a gunman in June of 1968.
    Political assassination was suddenly becoming routine.
    You didn’t have to sink very deep into the internet when Obama was President to find comments threatening his life.
    I am disturbed to report that I have seen threats of violence to Trump.
    As much as I despise the man I can not tolerate calls to remove him from office by non Constitutional means!
    I have been through this before!
    Political assassination is a fundamental indicator of a shithole!

  3. Kylopod says:

    @Mister Bluster:

    You didn’t have to sink very deep into the internet when Obama was President to find comments threatening his life.

    In point of fact, Obama may hold the record for most recorded threats against a president’s life–and he certainly started receiving these threats earlier than any previous candidate for president.

    Trump is a highly despised president, and so was Bush. But at least they’re both white. I recently read a book about MLK (Kennedy and King, by Steven Levingston), and one anecdote in particular sticks in my mind: King announced to his audience that Sammy Davis Jr. was going to perform. A 6’2″, 200-pound neo-Nazi suddenly got on the stage and started beating the 5’7″ King right there. With his philosophy of nonviolence, King just stood there and took it. The man was evidently outraged by the mere mention of the interracially married Davis.

    Racist hate in this country isn’t some abstraction; it has always had a tendency to send its adherents into blinding, violent rage. King understood that, and the civil rights movement which he led used that fact to their advantage, because they knew the mere sight of a black person sitting down at a whites-only lunch counter or the front of a bus would invariably provoke a massive overreaction from the other side. If you think about it, it was kind of a form of political jujitsu in which they took the Southerners’ exertion of power over them and leveraged it against them.

  4. Franklin says:

    @Mister Bluster: According to the Washington Post, several sources say the word was actually sh*thouse, not sh*thole. While there’s little difference to most people, it allowed a couple Republican Senators to deny that Trump said sh*thole without technically lying.

  5. Mister Bluster says:

    @Franklin:..it allowed a couple Republican Senators to deny that Trump said sh*thole without technically lying.

    Yes. I read about those two shitheads!

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