Texas Caucus Count Still Crawling

According to CNN, only 39 percent of the votes in the Texas Caucus, which awards 1/3 of the Lone Star State’s delegates, have been counted. Obama’s up 56-44.

Why in the heck would it take longer to count the votes in a caucus — which takes place instantly and involves a relative few people — than in the primary?

FILED UNDER: General
James Joyner
About James Joyner
James Joyner is Professor and Department Head of Security Studies at Marine Corps University's Command and Staff College and a nonresident senior fellow at the Scowcroft Center for Strategy and Security at the Atlantic Council. He's a former Army officer and Desert Storm vet. Views expressed here are his own. Follow James on Twitter @DrJJoyner.

Comments

  1. Tlaloc says:

    Mathematics: the natural enemy of the Texan…

  2. Doug says:

    Lots of confusion. I was my caucus chair, and still have my paperwork. It isn’t officially due till tomorrow.

    Obama won my precinct 8-6

  3. This story tells the El Paso side of the caucus mess…

    None of this is new to the Democrat Party, and that ain’t just GOP rage-boy nonesense. The whole caucus system is bizarre, confusing, frustrating and not really in line with Texan ideals — at least, West Texas ideas of “talk slow, talk quietly, say what you mean and shut up.”

    The divisiveness and confusion appear to be hallmarks of an all-inclusive, every-voice-counts-equally mindset among Democrats that waters-down agendas, creates self-serving sub-groups and ultimately leads to the Dems losing out, as so often, to the GOP. Dems so often are divided to the point of conquering themselves. Repubs just go in and mop up.

  4. jabberwock says:

    The divisiveness and confusion appear to be hallmarks of an all-inclusive, every-voice-counts-equally mindset among Democrats that waters-down agendas, creates self-serving sub-groups and ultimately leads to the Dems losing out, as so often, to the GOP. Dems so often are divided to the point of conquering themselves. Repubs just go in and mop up.

    The Clinton Agenda…split the party at all costs

  5. Michael says:

    The divisiveness and confusion appear to be hallmarks of an all-inclusive, every-voice-counts-equally mindset among Democrats

    That’s a bad thing?

  6. James B. says:

    How does Hillary win the popular vote in TX by almost 100,00 give or take and somehow is behind in the caucus by 10%? …doesnt make sense..I understand the purpose and concept of the caucus..but with that cushion of 100,000 how is Obama up by 10%…FUZZY MATH

  7. Tlaloc says:

    That’s a bad thing?

    Of course it’s a bad thing! The founding fathers wanted only white landowning males to be suffraged, and, as we all know, the founding fathers were infallible.

    Let the peons have a voice and who knows what will happen!

  8. Len says:

    According to CNN, only 39 percent of the votes in the Texas Caucus, which awards 2/3 of the Lone Star State’s delegates, have been counted.

    Texas has 228 delegates. Only 67 (or thereabouts) are tied to the caucuses.

    When (and how) did 67 become 2/3 of 228?

    How does Hillary win the popular vote in TX by almost 100,00 give or take and somehow is behind in the caucus by 10%?

    Simple. More Obama voters attended the caucuses than did Clinton voters. Just because you voted in the primary is no guarantee that you would go back for the caucus.

  9. Beldar says:

    According to the Houston Chronicle (perishable link) as of 11:36pm last night:

    Projections released Wednesday afternoon by the Texas Democratic Party based on still-incomplete caucus returns indicated that Obama would receive 98 delegates elected Tuesday to Clinton’s 95.

    Clinton led Obama in delegates selected as a result of primary voting, 65 to 61, while Obama appears headed for a 37-to-30 edge among delegates selected through the caucuses.

    Including elected officials and party leaders with automatic “superdelegate” status, the two candidates are dead even at 107 Texas delegates, with 14 superdelegates still uncommitted.

    As for why it takes so long to complete: Everyone knows that getting the dead people in Duval County to vote in alphabetical order is a bitch, since they all have to use the same sign-in pen and handwriting.

  10. Boyd says:

    I’m glad you mentioned that, Len. I was under the impression that the caucuses were supposed to account for roughly a third of the Texas Democratic delegates, and was surprised to learn that James thinks it’s 2/3s.

  11. James Joyner says:

    When (and how) did 67 become 2/3 of 228?

    and

    surprised to learn that James thinks it’s 2/3s

    Just a transposition of two thoughts. Fixed now.