The Process is the Punishment

Rob “Acidman” Smith had a bad day yesterday and it sounds like there will be some more lousy ones ahead.

Granting that I only have his version of events, it seems ridiculous that one person can wreak that much havoc on another’s life without any consequences. It’s been said of the American justice system that the process is the punishment. Even if one is acquitted of criminal charges or found not liable for civil damages, the hit to one’s reputation, pocketbook, and time is irreversible. Accusing someone of a crime with no evidence and malicious intent ought to be punishable itself as a crime.

I would observe, however, that mentioning on a rather popular Internet site that you’d like advice on how to leave the country under an assumed name with $300,000 in untraceable cash might lead to suspicion in some quarters.

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FILED UNDER: Law and the Courts
James Joyner
About James Joyner
James Joyner is Professor and Department Head of Security Studies at Marine Corps University's Command and Staff College and a nonresident senior fellow at the Scowcroft Center for Strategy and Security at the Atlantic Council. He's a former Army officer and Desert Storm vet. Views expressed here are his own. Follow James on Twitter @DrJJoyner.

Comments

  1. “Accusing someone of a crime with no evidence and malicious intent ought to be punishable itself as a crime.”

    I’m pretty sure it is a crime. Hell, the charges the Feds are using on Martha Stewart (lying to investigators, or some such) will cover it; if not, use whatever those teenage girls in California just got nailed with for fabricating child molestation charges against an innocent homeless guy.

    The trick is convicting people who do it–but considering you pretty much have to either kill someone or be a complete moron to go away for anything except drug charges on a first offense, don’t hold your breath on that happening.

  2. Sandcrab says:

    I don’t agree that Rob said anything about using an assumed name or the $300K being untraceable. All I read was that he wanted to leave the country for someplace that GA authorities couldn’t reach him and to take his money with him. Sounds to me like reasonable desires for anyone in his situation. As to whether either can be done legally or not, well……..

  3. Paul says:

    Sandcrab said: I don’t agree that Rob said anything about using an assumed name or the $300K being untraceable

    ummm did you read the part where he said:

    “How do I get $300,000 out of the country under an assummed name?”

    I really wonder if a large number of the people who comment on blogs actually read.