WINE BLOGGING

Avia Pinot Grigio (Slovenia) 2002

I didn’t even know Slovenia made wine, let alone exported it to the U.S. But, given their proximity to Italy, I shouldn’t have been surprised that they made a pinot grigio.

Rating: 2 I like pinot grigios and this one was priced so low (on sale for around $4) that it was impossible to resist picking up a bottle. Although made from the same grape as chardonays, pinot grigios tend to be less dry and a bit fruiter. The Avia was an exception on both counts. Indeed, this wine is more reminiscent of a chablis jug wine than any pinot grigio I’ve tried before. Fortunately, I only bought the one bottle.

See this post for the scale and methodology.

FILED UNDER: Iraq War
James Joyner
About James Joyner
James Joyner is Professor and Department Head of Security Studies at Marine Corps University's Command and Staff College and a nonresident senior fellow at the Scowcroft Center for Strategy and Security at the Atlantic Council. He's a former Army officer and Desert Storm vet. Views expressed here are his own. Follow James on Twitter @DrJJoyner.

Comments

  1. colson says:

    While I like whites with a bit more fruity taste (ala Reisling and Peisporters), I’ll take your advice. I like red wines quite a bit and would recommend one of my favorites: Gabianno Chianti 2002, or even the Gabianno Classico Chianti 1999 as great budget reds with a perfect balance of tanin-to-sweet. It may not quite hit your budget (it varies from 8.99-12.49). Worth a try if you come upon it.

  2. John Hudock says:

    Pinot Grigio’s have never been a favorite of mine, nice as a summer picnic drink on occasion but not much more to them. The Italian’s have gotten much better recently but they are still not much more then a pleasant drink. If you are looking for good, cheap white try some of the below $10 Australian Chardonnays. They quality level is very high, my personal favorite and my house white is the Lindemann’s Bin 65 which you can get for under $6 if you shop around. I’ve been drinking it for at least 10 years and it is not only very high quality for a wine of that price but it is amazingly consistent from year to year.
    Other inexpensive whites worth exploring are dry rieslings and gewurztraminers from California and Australia. They are seriously underappreciated by the public at large (as are the more serious desert versions), and are easily the equal of Chardonnay. They also pair better with spicy food, especially curries, than any other wine. If you want to try a great, world class Gewurztraminer (for world class money) try some of the great Alsatians (Zind Humbrecht, Marcel Deiss). Trimbach and Hugel also make very nice bottles under $20. Very good California Gewurz include Beringer, Martinelli, Fetzer, all inexpensive.

    Good drinking.

WINE BLOGGING

Apparently, blogging about wine is all the rage in the blogosphere. Rather than risk getting left behind, OTB is getting aboard this trend before it’s too late. Unfortunately, I really don’t know anything about wine, other than it’s made from rotten grapes and can give you a buzz if consumed in excess. But, as regular OTB readers can attest, having little or no knowledge about a subject has never stopped me before.

My criteria:

  • Only fancy-schmancy wines will be reviewed. By “fancy-schmancy,” I mean not only that the wine comes encased in glass rather than a plastic bladder surrounded by a cardboard box but that the top doesn’t screw off, instead requiring removal of a cork.
  • The wine will not have cost more than $10 for a standard .750 liter bottle. More likely, it will have cost under $7.
  • The wine will never have been featured on an episode of Sanford & Son.
  • I will have purchased and consumed the wine in question quite recently. Indeed, I’ll likely be doing so during the review.

I’ll rate wines conforming to those rigorous standards on a 5-point scale:

    1- I’d rather be in a pine box on a slow train to Georgia than drink this ever again.

    2-The wine equivalent of BlogSpot.

    3-Something I’d drink any day–but I wouldn’t shoot a man in Reno just for another bottle.

    4-Dang, this is good! I might be willing to pay $11 a bottle for this.

    5-Better than an InstaLanche.

Also, to the extent wine reviewing is a matter of personal taste rather than scientific training, I tend not to enjoy particularly dry wines, so keep that in mind.
(more…)

FILED UNDER: Iraq War
James Joyner
About James Joyner
James Joyner is Professor and Department Head of Security Studies at Marine Corps University's Command and Staff College and a nonresident senior fellow at the Scowcroft Center for Strategy and Security at the Atlantic Council. He's a former Army officer and Desert Storm vet. Views expressed here are his own. Follow James on Twitter @DrJJoyner.

Comments

  1. How much did it go for on the East Coast? Enquiring minds, you know . . .

  2. Sam says:

    You know that two buck Chuck (Charles Shaw) is available at local (northern VA) Trader Joe’s, right? Only it costs $3 instead of the $2 in California.

  3. James Joyner says:

    LMA: I’d have to dig out the receipt, but I found it on sale at the local Giant supermarket for under $7–maybe even under $6.

    Sam: Never tried the Chuck. I’m a bit leery of wines famous for being $2 but will look for it if I’m ever at Trader Joe’s.

  4. > 2-The wine equivalent of BlogSpot.

    Come on. BlogSpot isn’t THAT bad. It should be at least a “3”

    Also, 2 Buck Chuck doesn’t do anything for me, so just buy a single bottle and try before anything more.

  5. Sam says:

    A lot of wines I can’t stand to drink, Charles Shaw is at least (and perhaps at most) acceptable for drinking. However, it is a very good value for use as cooking wines.

  6. I’m found some pretty drinkable reds at Trader Joe’s for $2. But then, I’m in California, where most of the high-end varietals are grown.

    I didn’t realize Trader Joe’s had spread to the East Coast–last I knew, they’d only got as far East as Arizona.

    Basically, a bottle of wine should cost $5-$7, unless it’s for a special occasion. And a glass of wine should be $4 (but they are often $6, even for a house Merlot at an unpretentious little Italian place).

  7. Todd says:

    JJ,

    Give this wonderful Shiraz/Cabernet mix a swig:

    Jacob’s Creek – 2001; from SE Austrailia

    My brother-in-law and I have had a hard time finding anything under $10 to beat this wonderful wine. Here in Michigan I have found this wine as low as $7 a bottle.

    Happy New Year all!

  8. Wine Blogging
    OUTSIDE THE BELTWAY has joined the wine blogging craze. I limit myself to bourbon and beer. I do not drink wine as it is made from a fruit and I don’t eat fruit. Christy doesn’t much care for it either. So, I will stick with the whine blogging a/k/a…

  9. Why wine?
    James Joyner jumps on the wine blogging craze. I won’t be jumping aboard, as I’m not much of a wine drinker; however, I will say that you can’t go wrong with Rosemount, a purveyor of fine, inexpensive Australian wines.