Judging a Book By its Cover

Will Baude defends the virtue of the paperback book from the aesthetic snobbery of Amber Taylor, concurring in part and dissenting in part from the views of Polytropos’ Nate.

I prefer hardcovers for books that I collect and intend to display on my shelves–“shelfworthy,” indeed–but rather prefer paperbacks for utilitarian books that I intend to annotate in some fashion. It just feels somehow wrong to defile a hardcover editon with flourescent yellow highlights and marginalia.

FILED UNDER: Education
James Joyner
About James Joyner
James Joyner is Professor and Department Head of Security Studies at Marine Corps University's Command and Staff College and a nonresident senior fellow at the Scowcroft Center for Strategy and Security at the Atlantic Council. He's a former Army officer and Desert Storm vet. Views expressed here are his own. Follow James on Twitter @DrJJoyner.

Comments

  1. Boyd says:

    Marginalia. Heh.

  2. bryan says:

    concurring in part and dissenting in part from the views of Polytropos’ Nate.

    But was this opinion distinguished from Taylor v. Baude?

    As long as we’re going through the legalese, I figured you might as well go for the whole enchilada.

  3. Kate says:

    Hey, that reminds me? Did you ever find time to read it?

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