Wednesday’s Forum

FILED UNDER: Open Forum
James Joyner
About James Joyner
James Joyner is Professor and Department Head of Security Studies at Marine Corps University's Command and Staff College and a nonresident senior fellow at the Scowcroft Center for Strategy and Security at the Atlantic Council. He's a former Army officer and Desert Storm vet. Views expressed here are his own. Follow James on Twitter @DrJJoyner.

Comments

  1. CSK says:

    I’m very much afraid that this is our Teve:

    http://www.tributearchive.com/obituaries/22335572/steve-brandon-story/lake-city/florida/gateway-forest-lawn-funeral-home

    Damn. Just damn. I liked him. He’ll be missed.

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  2. MarkedMan says:

    @CSK: Damn. He will be missed. I always wanted to see his take on things.

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  3. James Joyner says:

    @CSK: It’s a distinct possibility. Teve’s last post here was the afternoon of the 10th and this Steve died the next day. Shit.

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  4. CSK says:

    @MarkedMan: @James Joyner:

    Our Teve had mentioned attending North Carolina State and living in Lake City at some point, I believe. And the age is identical.

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  5. James Joyner says:

    @CSK: Yes. He has mentioned NC State multiple times but, in this comment at least, he says he graduated in 2005. That would be rather late for someone who graduated high school in 1994.

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  6. OzarkHillbilly says:

    Too damned young. RiP Teve.

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  7. CSK says:

    @James Joyner:
    True, but he might have dropped out for a while, and then resumed his education. It happens. I do think this s our guy. I wish it were otherwise.

    Speaking of “otherwise,” I had recommended a poem titled thus by Jane Kenyon to Teve when he was asking for reading recommendations.

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  8. Scott says:

    Teve’s voice will be missed. It is always hard when it is someone so young. May his memory be a blessing.

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  9. Sleeping Dog says:

    @CSK:

    Thanks for finding that.

    Goodspeed Teve

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  10. CSK says:

    @Sleeping Dog:
    Jax asked last night where Teve was. That got me wondering, so I looked. I’m sorrier than I can say to have found what I did.

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  11. Jen says:

    What sad and awful news to wake up to. He will be missed.

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  12. CSK says:

    @Jen:
    Indeed. It’s astonishing how attached you become to people you meet here at OTB.

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  13. Moosebreath says:

    Such a shame. I will miss Teve.

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  14. Kathy says:

    @CSK:

    Fuck. why do the good die young

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  15. de stijl says:

    A good and a solid voice. He will be sorely missed.

    He was a good person. Did not like working retail, but you do what ya gotta do.

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  16. charon says:

    Sad news, I will miss him.

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  17. JohnSF says:

    Oh, bloody hell. That’s awful.

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  18. Mike in Arlington says:

    I always enjoyed his posts and thought he was a smart guy. I’ll miss him too.

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  19. Mu Yixiao says:

    North Carolina Voter ID law ruled unconstitutional.

    The court found that “the evidence at trial [is] sufficient to show that the enactment of [the voter ID law] was motivated at least in part by an unconstitutional intent to target African American voters.”

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  20. Mu Yixiao says:

    Florida to go blue in 2022
    (Because there won’t be any reds left alive.)

    Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis announced Tuesday that the state’s new surgeon general will be Joseph Ladapo, a UCLA researcher known for opposing evidence-based mask mandates, vaccine mandates, and lockdowns.

    Instead, Dr. Ladapo advocates for the controversial idea of embracing “the reality of viral spread” to achieve herd immunity.

    Because there won’t be any reds left alive.

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  21. CSK says:

    Trump has launched a $100 million lawsuit against his niece Mary and three NYTimes reporters on the grounds that they formulated “an insidious plot to smuggle his confidential and highly sensitive records” from his lawyer’s office.

    Mary Trump’s response was to laugh and call her uncle “a fucking loser.”

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  22. Kathy says:

    @CSK:

    From what I’ve read, the tiny don might have a case against his niece, as she was party to a confidentiality/NDA deal. I’m sure neither the NYT nor its reporters were a party to that deal.

    I’m sure, too, any perceived damages by tiny were far, far, far from what he’s asking ($100 million). In fact, i’d love it if he were to win his case, and be awarded $1 in damages.

    Say, in the discovery phase, can the defendants ask for evidence of the actual damages? Wouldn’t that mean looking at the tiny don’s finances from 2018 to the present?

    BTW, something ought to be done about the use of NDAs in trade and industry. All too often, they seem to be sued to cover up malfeasance rather than for legitimate purposes such as protecting trade secrets.

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  23. gVOR08 says:

    @Mu Yixiao: My local SW FL semi pro paper has an article today on the new Surgeon General. It mentions the incumbent, and that he’s leaving Monday. Says nothing about why he’s leaving, which I suspect is the real story.

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  24. CSK says:

    @Kathy:
    The interesting thing is that Robert Trump used the same NDA to sue Mary and Simon and Shuster after the publication of her book. That lawsuit got shot down by a judge who said the NDA was too vaguely worded.

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  25. CSK says:

    Alina Habba, Trump’s lawyer in this suit, is located in Bedminster, NJ. Did he find her on the golf course?

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  26. Kathy says:

    @CSK:

    I wouldn’t trust anyone who pays the tiny don any money.

    On other things, I’ve been reading about boosters for the Pfizer and J&J shots. short version: they add even more protection against infection, mild disease, severe disease, hospitalization, and death.

    Long version: the protection is already good, even 5 months after the second dose, especially if one also takes additional precautions like distancing and masking. What would help more is to get over 95% of the population vaccinated (we keep coming back to that for a reason).

    There are exceptions for those whoa re immunocompromised or have several risk factors.

    Given how undervaccinated the world as a whole still is, especially in poorer countries, it makes more sense to keep precautions in place and rush more doses to these countries*.

    That said, if I can manage a trip to the US for a third shot, I probably will get it.

    There are other matters as well. Data is sketchy still, but it seems that a different vaccine would work better as a booster than an additional dose of the same vaccine. Meaning if you got Pfizer or Moderna (mRNA vaccines), you may do better taking a dose of J&J or AstraZeneca (virus vector vaccines).

    *BTW, Russia is horribly undervaccinated when one considers they developed their own vaccine, Sputnik V, and are exporting large amounts of doses overseas. The other countries to develop widely used vaccines, China, the US, Germany**, and the UK, are doing far better vaccinating their own citizens.

    **Germany doesn’t get talked about much in this regard, but BioNTech, one half of the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine, is a German firm.

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  27. Jax says:

    @Kathy: Before my kids came down with it, I was seriously considering getting a J & J shot. Now I’m just waiting to see if I make it through their quarantines unscathed. Oldest is cleared for school tomorrow, youngest not til Tuesday. So far, so good, on my end. Youngest is getting hit a little harder than the oldest did, she’s got a pretty deep cough/persistent headache and stuffy nose. Oldest had a stuffy nose/headache for a few days, that’s it.

    It’s an odd thing, really, to be considering what’s going on inside my immune system the last 10 days, fighting off the inevitable virus it’s encountering in my house (I’ve been making them mask up if they leave their rooms, and I wipe surfaces they might’ve touched with Clorox, but even then, it’s airborne, it’s here, even if I can’t see it or clean it). Every day I wake up and take stock, to see if there’s anything that feels noticeably “sick” or even just off, like my sense of smell or taste.

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  28. Mike in Arlington says:

    @Jax: check your lymph nodes. Not just the ones in your neck, also check the ones in your armpits. Mine were a bit tender just before I came down with COVID. If I had to guess, it’s because those lymph nodes are closer to my lungs, which was one of the locations of my infection (I also noticed the same thing when I came down with the flu a couple of years ago).

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  29. de stijl says:

    The Gabby Petito coverage is driving me nuts.

    In the last decade over 400 indigenous native American women have gone missing in Wyoming alone. Where is the national news on that? Absolute silence.

    One of the biggest symptoms of implicit bias is that the disappearance of one type of victim gets breathless national coverage and another type is virtually ignored.

    Pretty, young, white, blonde gets national attention.

    Echos back to the rash of late 90s fixational reporting.

    Others? That’s a dime a dozen story. Boring. Who cares?

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  30. Mister Bluster says:

    News from Sleepytown

    (Southern Illinois University) Athletic Director Liz Jarnigan fired amid alleged abuse cover-up on women’s swim and dive team
    “[Jarnigan] knew about these reports and she did not do anything,” Athlete 1 said. “She never talked to Geoff [Hanson] about fixing this situation.”

    Ousted SIU athletic director Jarnigan hired compliance officer under show-cause order
    Alex Parker was SIU’s associate athletic director in charge of compliance until being reassigned to the equipment department earlier this month. Parker is currently listed on the Saluki online staff directory as associate athletic director for special projects under the facilities department.
    He was the associate athletic director for compliance at the University of Akron from 2014 to May 18, 2020, when he resigned following an interview with NCAA Committee on Enforcement staff. Parker admitted to giving loans between $100-$1,000 out of his personal bank account to nine Akron football players, totaling $5,900, during the 2014-15 and 2019-20 school years.

    Looks like SIU sure picked a winner when they hired Liz Jarnigan.

    Looks like my second link may be behind a paywall. It wasn’t when I copy and pasted the quote from the item.

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  31. CSK says:

    @de stijl:
    Young, pretty, blonde, and white…absolutely it gets more attention. But she was middle class as well, therefore officially a nice girl. Bad things aren’t supposed to happen to nice girls from “good,” affluent families.

    You can predict what things will interest the news people.

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  32. Kathy says:

    @Jax:

    Sometimes I wish the immune system would give some indication of what it’s doing. Even if only: “Don’t worry. We got this.”

    The flaw in the “good enough protection” argument, is that the vaccination levels required to stop the Delta variant transmission won’t be reached in the trumpy states before the outbreak runs its course. Therefore, we may need to resort to third doses just the same.

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  33. OzarkHillbilly says:

    @de stijl: Same as it ever was.

    A couple years back a *young, white, Washington University student was killed in a robbery/carjacking in the “safe” and trendy Central West End neighborhood. Quite the brouhaha. Front page news. Cops flooded that mostly white and low crime neighborhood for quite some time afterwards. Meanwhile, a few miles away in N STL several young black girls were raped/robbed/shot/killed/whatever and never merited more than a page C21 paragraph in the paper.

    Investigations? Fuhgeddaboudit.

    * I may very well have some of the details wrong on this specific crime, but not about the victim

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  34. Pylon says:

    @Kathy: If I’m the defendants I argue that, since Trump has promised he’d release his tax info many times, there’s zero damages.

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  35. Mu Yixiao says:

    @de stijl:

    In the last decade over 400 indigenous native American women have gone missing in Wyoming alone. Where is the national news on that? Absolute silence.

    Pretty, young, white, blonde gets national attention.

    I’m sure a lot of other pretty, young, white girls have gone missing as well–and gotten absolute silence.

    Petito is a “YouTube star”–which plays with the younger demographics. She didn’t just “disappear”, she was on a trip with her fiancee, who returned home alone… and then disappeared himself. Now it’s juicy. There are incidents of domestic conflict and “odd” messages to her mother. Now it’s a full-fledged drama.

    If a less-than-attractive Native American woman was a “YouTube influencer”, posted her adventures to tens of thousands of followers, went on a months-long (well-documented) trip with her fiancee (after domestic violence calls and public posts indicating things weren’t going well), disappeared after an odd text message, and had her fiancee return home months early with no explanation of what happened to her….

    The media would be all over it.

    “Local girl goes missing” doesn’t sell ad space–no matter what that girl looks like. And nobody gives a rat’s ass if “local man goes missing”.

    That Petito is pretty is just gravy. It’s all about a story full of juicy kibble that can be dissected, amplified, sexed up, and fed to the readers in little bits that keep them hungry for more.

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  36. CSK says:

    @Mu Yixiao:
    Petito seems to have been an Instagram influencer (with 72,000 followers) rather than a Youtube influencer. Everything on Youtube relating to her seems to have to do with her disappearance and death.

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  37. Mu Yixiao says:

    @Michael Reynolds:

    Here’s your “house in the woods“.

    Also: see “Amish”. I mean…. Can you believe this sewage-filled anarchist hovel?

    We need government for many things at many levels.

    It is not, however, “radical” or “stupid” to say that the government has assumed far too much control over far too many aspects of our lives. And it’s blatantly false to insist that we can’t operate as rational persons without the government dictating the minute details of our lives.

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  38. CSK says:

    @Mu Yixiao:
    I was once at a dinner party where one of those at the table suddenly announced that “the first duty of government is to protect people from themselves.” Granted, he was an idiot, and most of the others knew it, but that pronunciamento still gave even the most left-wing guests the shivers.

    This guy was a big believer in raising taxes, but he cheated on his.

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  39. Jax says:

    @Kathy: I’ve had a slight fever and headache in the evenings, nothing over 100. And my earhole still hurts like a bastard. One whole month, two rounds of antibiotics and steroids, and it’s still there (I’m starting to think it’s more sinister than an ear infection). Maybe the meds for the ear infection are helping fight the (hopefully) low viral loads the kids are leaving around the house? Every day that goes by and I’m not coughing or blowing my nose, I heap praise on Team Moderna!! And you can bet your ass I’ll be first up in line for my combined Moderna FluCov booster shot in the future! 😛

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  40. Mimai says:

    @Jax: Sorry to hear about your human children. How are your BG children doing these days?

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  41. Jax says:

    Wellllll, shit. Wyoming’s activated the National Guard to help hospitals with Covid.

    Sublette County Public Health
    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    September 21, 2021
    Governor Activates Wyoming National Guard to Provide Hospital Assistance
    CHEYENNE, Wyo. – Wyoming’s hospitals have sought additional support to respond to the COVID-19 pandemic and the surge in hospitalized patients. There are approximately 200 people with COVID-19 in Wyoming hospitals today, which is near the peak number the state has seen during the pandemic. Governor Mark Gordon has activated guardsmen who have stepped forward to provide temporary assistance to hospitals throughout the state.
    Governor Gordon has called approximately 95 Soldiers and Airmen to State Active Duty orders, assigned to hospital locations at 24 different sites within 17 Wyoming cities. They will serve to augment current hospital and Wyoming Department of Health staff to help ease workloads imposed upon them due to large numbers of COVID-19 hospitalizations.
    “I am grateful to the members of our Wyoming National Guard for once again answering the call to provide assistance in our hospitals during this surge,” Governor Gordon said. “Our Guard members truly are Wyoming’s sword and shield, and their commitment to our state is something for which every Wyoming citizen can be thankful.”
    Guard members’ responsibilities will include: assisting in environmental cleanup in hospital facilities; food and nutrition service; COVID-19 screening; managing personal protective equipment (PPE) supplies; and other support tasks. Some will also be trained to administer COVID-19 tests.
    “The Delta variant has overwhelmed the medical institutions of states across this country. Our state is no different with most hospitals at or near capacity,” said Col. David Pritchett, director of the joint staff for the Wyoming National Guard. “The Soldiers and Airmen of the Wyoming National Guard are proud to jump back in to provide much needed assistance to our communities as we continue to battle the effects of COVID-19.”
    The orders for guardsmen will be 14-30 day rotations, with the potential to extend beyond that, up until Dec. 31. The numbers and locations of guardsmen may change based on hospital needs.

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