And In Religion Of Peace News

A court in Saudi Arabia sentenced a teacher to 40 months in jail and 750 lashes for “mocking religion” after he discussed the Bible and praised Jews, a Saudi newspaper said on Sunday.

Al-Madina newspaper said secondary school teacher Mohammad al-Harbi will be flogged in public after he was taken to court by his colleagues and students.

He was charged with promoting a “dubious ideology, mocking religion, saying the Jews were right, discussing the gospel and preventing students from leaving class to wash for prayer”, the newspaper said. It gave no more details.

Saudi Arabia, the birthplace of Islam, strictly upholds the austere Wahhabi school of Islam and bases its constitution on the Koran and the sayings of Prophet Mohammad. Public practice of any other religion is banned.

Via the Corner

FILED UNDER: General, Religion, , , ,
Kate McMillan
About Kate McMillan
Kate McMillan is the proprietor of small dead animals, which has won numerous awards including Best Conservative Blog and Best Canadian Blog. She contributed nearly 300 pieces to OTB between November 2004 and June 2007. Follow her on Twitter @katewerk.

Comments

  1. Elmo says:

    Who nows how many dedicated terror operators are currently getting wired up? How many pipelines are loading? We can’t really depend on those fereekin non team players over at Langley for much of anything (but hey … what do you want for $44B?). And who it seems, never tire of spankin dumonkaye.

    But we can celebrate single individuals. Who have no fear. Who turn and face the bloody rain. Without a quiver. Without a whimper.

  2. Jonk says:

    Ummm….no.

  3. John Burgess says:

    I noted this a couple of days ago on my blog, as well as a protest from the Saudi Al-Watan newspaper. Everything written about it so far also notes that the case is being appealed, is unjust, and does not follow the laws. I suspect that it’ll be overturned quickly.

    You can read more about it here

  4. Elmo says:

    Interesting minor parallel, lefty teachers in the U.S., right (gwot) teachers in S.A.

  5. anjin-san says:

    Lamentable, no doubt. But are we so sure we have our own house in order?

  6. ATM says:

    Anjin,

    Are we lashing people for discussing religion?

  7. dutchmarbel says:

    James Yee entered Guantanamo as a patriotic US officer and Muslim chaplain. He ended up in shackles, branded a spy. This is his disturbing story.

    My cell was 8ft by 6ft, the same size as the detainees’ cages at Guantanamo. Barely a week ago I had received a glowing evaluation for my work as the US army’s Muslim chaplain among the “Gitmo” prisoners. Now I was the one in chains.

    It was my turn to be humiliated every time I was taken to have a shower. Naked, I had to run my hands through my hair to show that I was not concealing a weapon in it. Then mouth open, tongue up, down, nothing inside. Right arm up, nothing in my armpit. Left arm up. Lift the right testicle, nothing hidden. Lift the left. Turn around, bend over, spread your buttocks, knowing a camera was displaying my naked image as male and female guards watched.

    It didn’t matter that I was an army captain, a graduate of West Point, the elite US military academy. It didn’t matter that my religious beliefs prohibited me from being fully naked in front of strangers. It didn’t matter that I hadn’t been charged with a crime. It didn’t matter that my wife and daughter had no idea where I was. And it certainly didn’t matter that I was a loyal American citizen and, above all, innocent.

    I was accused of mutiny and sedition, aiding the enemy and espionage, all of which carried the death penalty. I was regarded as a traitor to the army and my country. This was all blatantly untrue — as would be proved when, after a long fight, all the charges against me were dropped and I won an honourable discharge from the army.

    I knew why I had been arrested: it was because I am a Muslim. I was just the latest victim of the hostility born the moment when the planes flew into the twin towers and the Pentagon on September 11, 2001.

    My real “crime” had been that I had tried to ensure that the suspected Taliban and Al-Qaeda fighters detained in the Gitmo cages were given every opportunity to practise their religion freely, one of the most fundamental of American ideals.

  8. LJD says:

    …So what about the lashing?

  9. dutchmarbel says:

    You ment that literally???

  10. LJD says:

    Yes, I did. My point being: we are not lashing people. For some reason, people can’t tell the difference.

    In the case of James Yee, although his “sensibilities” were offended by the treatment he received, he was under suspicion, and detained. Strip searches sound like SOP for a high security prison. What are we supposed to do, take their word of honor? “Yes, by Allah, I have no weapons” (and I have a bridge to sell you)

  11. dutchmarbel says:

    Ah, well, I can agree with you there. Americans are not the lashing kind.

    Lots of other things, but no lashing. Probabely not even in the secret detention centers FKA gulag – though we can’t really be sure about that of course.

  12. McGehee says:

    Must be duck season at Anjin-san’s house.

  13. LJD says:

    It takes a deep hatred for this country to read a story about injustice in another, and find a way to use it as a complaint against the U.S.

    Alleged “torture” against detainees is a far, far cry from religious persecution. If you really belive that is what is going on, perhaps you’d like to try life in another country, like Saudi Arabia.

  14. conservative says:

    Well thankyou Mr. Moore!

    As far as I’m concerned you people are traitors! The fact that George Bush holds hands and kisses Saudi princes is not mulitculturalism, it is respect for capitalism, these people mean money and power!

    You want to attack Republican ties to these people, but what your hero Kim does in North Korea is far worse! Go back to the Kerry campaign you loser!

  15. anjin-san says:

    ATM,

    So there are no poor people in prison in America who were wrongly convicted because they could not work the legal system properly? Not a single innocent on death row?

    You do know what happens in prison, no?

    Injustice is injustice. Go ahead and demonize Musilims if it makes you feel better somehow, but you need to keep in mind that your hero Bush is pratically an employee of the Saudi’s, and that the US is way deep in bed with them.

  16. dutchmarbel says:

    It takes a deep hatred for this country to read a story about injustice in another, and find a way to use it as a complaint against the U.S.

    If you reread you’ll see that I was not the one making a comparison with the US – I just reacted to your question.
    I actually used to be rather fond of the US – and there is still plenty I hold dear.

    Alleged “torture” against detainees is a far, far cry from religious persecution.

    That depends on how and why they are detained of course.

    If you really belive that is what is going on, perhaps you’d like to try life in another country, like Saudi Arabia.

    I am very happy living where I live, thank you 😉

  17. anjin-san says:

    LJD,

    Please. So now someone who disagrees with you “hates” America?

    Tell me, what happened to that Christian value, “let he among you who is without sin cast the first stone”? Its a value I am suggesting we try harder to pratice, and you translate that into “hatred of America”.

    Its a lot easier to point fingers at others then to take a hard look in the mirror.

  18. LJD says:

    “I was not the one making a comparison with the US – I just reacted to your question”

    I’m calling bullshit on that one…

    (Following post about James Yee which has not a damn thing to do with religious persecution in Saudi) Sarcasticaly: “Americans are not the lashing kind. Lots of other things, but no lashing.”

    More vague accusations here: “That depends on how and why they are detained of course.”

    “I am very happy living where I live, thank you ;)”

    Of course you are. You can spew forth unsubstaintiated B.S. without fear of repercussions. You can play “Devil’s Advocate” with the character of our troops. You can embolden the enemy without worrying about it’s impact our your life. Thanks to a solider BTW.

    O.K., you just want to insinuate that American soldiers are torturing people because of their religious preference. Anything relevant to say about the original post?

  19. Ralph says:

    It didn’t matter that I was an army captain… etc.

    On the contrary, it means Yee was subject to the Uniform Code of Military Justice (UCMJ) — a condition Yee assumed voluntarily

    And it certainly didn’t matter that I was …, above all, innocent.

    Au contraire, because,

    all the charges against me were dropped and I won an honourable discharge from the army.

    So our system works. In most other systems it would have mattered little if Yee was innocent or not.

    Sorry Yee had a bad time of it, and “a long fight” (BTW, who was it who offered, and likely supplied, his defense lawyer?) but that’s life. He could have been shoveling shit in Louisiana or doing time dodging IEDs in a Humvee. And in virtually any other military outside the Anglosphere he would have suffered much much worse. If surviving at all, it is highly unlikely he would have been discharged under “honorable” conditions.

    It didn’t matter that my religious beliefs prohibited me from being fully naked in front of strangers.

    Right on! It doesn’t matter. Re: UCMJ mentioned above. Don’t like it? Don’t accept a commission (and a free college education) from the USA. (BTW, how’d this kid get through basic training / West Point without a shower?)

    It’s against my religious beliefs to entertain whiners who aspire to be martyrs.

    Yee and the army are better off, one without the other. Too bad about the free college education at West Point that was wasted, though. Oh well, that’s life.

    Ya think the Saudi military has as much trouble with their Christian chaplains? {ROFLOL}

    Am I dismissive? You betcha.

    Next…!

  20. dutchmarbel says:

    It saddens me to see Americans seriously comparing their country to a repressive and fundametalistic country like Saoudi-Arabia. I’d never put those two in the same leaque and for me they are not seriously comparable.

    But that you are not as bad as them (and as a whole lot of other countries) doesn’t mean you cannot strive to be as good as you used to be.

    read and weap.

    ( I will be away for a few days, so cannot comment for a while)