Democrat Ben Nelson Approached for Agriculture Secretary

Sources: Dem approached for agriculture post (CNN)

Democratic Sen. Ben Nelson of Nebraska has been approached about becoming agriculture secretary in the Bush administration, according to two sources. His appointment could add a second Democrat to Bush’s Cabinet, as well as possibly increasing the GOP’s Senate majority. Republican Gov. Mike Johanns would get to choose Nelson’s replacement, which could increase the GOP’s advantage in the Senate to 56 seats.

Agriculture Secretary Ann Veneman announced her resignation Monday. President Bush’s top political adviser, Karl Rove, spoke to Nelson about the possibility in a telephone conversation last Friday, according to the two sources familiar with their conversation. Nelson has thus far declined to accept what the sources described as an offer or solicitation. Nelson told CNN he could not confirm or deny that an offer from Rove was made, adding that he is “happy” in his current job. But when pressed as to whether he would consider the job if Bush offered it, Nelson said, “Any time the president talks, you listen.”

Attempts to reach Rove for comment were not immediately successful. His office would not confirm or deny a specific conversation with Nelson, adding that it is Rove’s practice not to divulge private conversations with members of Congress. Two Bush administration officials said they were not aware of any job offer or discussion of a Cabinet post with Nelson. However, one of the officials confirmed that Rove spoke with Nelson in recent days, characterizing the call as an effort to reach out to discuss second-term priorities.

Nelson, 63, a former two-term governor, faces a potentially tough re-election race in 2006, running as a Democrat in a state that Bush carried by 33 points. However, the Nebraska moderate has been willing to cross the aisle to support Bush’s agenda, including his tax cuts and the war in Iraq. Given Nelson’s past work with the administration, a senior administration aide said he had “certainly the profile of someone we would look at” because of his past experience as a governor. He also hails from a major farm state. Currently, the only Democrat in Bush’s Cabinet is Transportation Secretary Norman Mineta.

A smart move all around. Given the close divide in the nation’s politics, it makes sense to tab a Red State Democrat for the post. And adding another Republican Senator to the fold, making it 56-43/44, would be an added bonus.

Update (11/18 1530): Apparently, this isn’t going to happen.

Nelson unlikely to join Bush Cabinet (United Press International)

Sen. Ben Nelson, D-Neb., is not interested in becoming President Bush’s next agriculture secretary, the Omaha World-Herald said Friday. Citing a congressional source speaking on the condition of anonymity, the paper said White House political adviser Karl Rove called Nelson, a centrist, last Friday to inquire whether he had any interest in becoming the second Democrat in Bush’s Cabinet. After considering the offer, Nelson decided to remain in the senate.

FILED UNDER: Congress, US Politics
James Joyner
About James Joyner
James Joyner is Professor and Department Head of Security Studies at Marine Corps University's Command and Staff College and a nonresident senior fellow at the Scowcroft Center for Strategy and Security at the Atlantic Council. He's a former Army officer and Desert Storm vet. Views expressed here are his own. Follow James on Twitter @DrJJoyner.

Comments

  1. Doug says:

    Does anybody know how he stands on Country of Orgin labeling?

  2. Brennan says:

    Man, I wish that they would appoint someone who would be willing to take on the agricultural subsidies. That would help poor countries more than our entire usaid budget, by some of the estimates I’ve seen.

  3. Flit(tm) says:

    Is A Senate Seat Worth Agriculture?
    The rumors about offering Agriculture to Sen Ben Nelson (D), if true, indicate a few things. Republicans both want to get as close as possible to 60 Senators in that house and Republican Agricultural policy under President Bush is either…