Georgia Senate Rejects Honor for Jane Fonda

The Georgia Senate easily defeated a resolution honoring Jane Fonda.

Jane Fonda’s 1972 trip to North Vietnam is haunting her again. The Georgia Senate on Thursday nearly unanimously defeated a resolution that would have honored the actress’ charity work in the state. The Democratic sponsor had tried to withdraw the resolution after a rocky reception from colleagues and a phone call from Fonda’s office, but a Republican leader forced a vote, saying members of his caucus wanted to go on record against it. Fonda, who is out of the country, had asked for the resolution to be withdrawn to avoid the controversy, said the sponsor, Sen. Steen Miles of suburban Atlanta. The effort was defeated 38-1, with even Miles voting against it.

The resolution cited the Atlanta resident’s work as founder of the Georgia Campaign for Adolescent Pregnancy Prevention, donations to universities and charities, and role as goodwill ambassador for the United Nations.

But Fonda’s political activities protesting the Vietnam War, including a trip to North Vietnam in 1972, have long made her a target of veterans. “I can think of no living American who is less worthy of this honor,” Republican Sen. John Douglas declared. “She is as guilty of treason as Benedict Arnold and Tokyo Rose.”

Miles argued that Fonda’s good works should outweigh the negatives.

Photo: John Fonda with NVA howitzer during Vietnam

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Full sized images here.

Not hardly.

FILED UNDER: General,
James Joyner
About James Joyner
James Joyner is Professor and Department Head of Security Studies at Marine Corps University's Command and Staff College and a nonresident senior fellow at the Scowcroft Center for Strategy and Security at the Atlantic Council. He's a former Army officer and Desert Storm vet. Views expressed here are his own. Follow James on Twitter @DrJJoyner.

Comments

  1. Um… last I checked, 38-1 is not unanimous.

  2. Whoops, my bad. I reread the paragraph and discovered that what I had read as “unanimous” was, in fact, “nearly unanimous”.

    Apologies.

  3. James Joyner says:

    I read it that way the first time, too. “Nearly unanimous” is an odd phrase.

  4. Maggie says:

    Congrats to Georgia for having good sense.