Mueller Report Delivered to Attorney General

The Friday news dump to beat all Friday news dumps.

NYT (“Mueller Delivers Report on Trump-Russia Investigation to Attorney General“):

The special counsel, Robert S. Mueller III, has delivered a report on his inquiry into Russian interference in the 2016 election to Attorney General William P. Barr, according to the Justice Department, bringing to a close an investigation that has consumed the nation and cast a shadow over President Trump for nearly two years.

Mr. Barr told congressional leaders in a letter late Friday that he may brief them within days on the special counsel’s findings. “I may be in a position to advise you of the special counsel’s principal conclusions as soon as this weekend,” he wrote in a letter to the leadership of the House and Senate Judiciary committees.

It is up to Mr. Barr how much of the report to share with Congress and, by extension, the American public. The House voted unanimously in March on a nonbinding resolution to make public the report’s findings, an indication of the deep support within both parties to air whatever evidence prosecutors uncovered.

Mr. Barr wrote that he “remained committed to as much transparency as possible and I will keep you informed as to the status of my review.” He also said that Justice Department officials never had to check Mr. Mueller because he proposed an inappropriate or unwarranted investigative step — an action that Mr. Barr would have been required to report to Congress under the regulations. His statement suggests that Mr. Mueller’s inquiry proceeded without political interference.

Well, we don’t know that. Indeed, President Trump’s numerous ranting tweets about Mueller and the investigation were certainly political and arguably constituted interference.

Beyond that, we don’t know much. I gather than no new indictments were issued but many have already been made public and several more are reportedly under seal.

The weekend should be interesting. Until we see the report or hear from Mueller himself, one presumes that Matt Borrs has it right: ” I definitely think the report I haven’t read supports the conclusions of the exact politics I hold and have been arguing for all this time. I love to be proven right!”

FILED UNDER: Donald Trump, Russia Investigation, US Politics
James Joyner
About James Joyner
James Joyner is a Security Studies professor at Marine Corps University's Command and Staff College and a nonresident senior fellow at the Scowcroft Center for Strategy and Security at the Atlantic Council. He's a former Army officer and Desert Storm vet. Views expressed here are his own. Follow James on Twitter @DrJJoyner.

Comments

  1. Modulo Myself says:

    It’s hard to see how the Mueller report will change anybody’s mind about him. The crazy Louise Mensch stuff has pretty much vanished. Meanwhile, it’s been proven that Trump is easy to blackmail. Russian oligarchs are not porn stars you can buy off with a 100K and David Pecker. There’s already unprovable innuendo about his obviously suspicious behavior re: Russia and Putin. I don’t think Rod Rosenstein would have been offering up his opinion about this behavior if the report wasn’t going to cast a huge shadow over Trump. But there won’t be a smoking gun–just an endless series of coincidences which we already know about. The dummies will believe it’s the Clintons, obviously, but the rest of us will probably little more than we do now.

    Then there’s the money…

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  2. Gustopher says:

    Beyond that, we don’t know much. I gather than no new indictments were issued but many have already been made public and several more are reportedly under seal.

    Also, we have a justice department guideline that sitting presidents cannot be indicted.

    So, lack of indictment at that level may not mean anything other than there is a justice department guideline that sitting presidents cannot be indicted.

    I expect the report to be leaked if it is not made public. I hope the report is thorough and answers questions, so we can hopefully put this behind us (either with Trump exhonerated, or in an orange jump suit…)

    My suspicion is that Trump is guilty as hell. If a thorough report is made public that shows he was merely a useful idiot, or entirely blameless, I will accept that.

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  3. Teve says:

    Threader
    Seth Abramson
    @SethAbramson
    Attorney. Professor @UofNH. Columnist @Newsweek. NYT bestselling author. Proof of Conspiracy (@StMartinsPress): t.co/iK2Sbuee4H. All opinions mine.
    Mar. 22, 2019 4 min read

    (THREAD) BREAKING NEWS: Mueller has sent a report to DOJ that DOJ is representing is “comprehensive” and will shortly be publicly summarized. A lot of the reporting surrounding this major event is *wrong*—so I’ll try to report things accurately. I hope you’ll read on and retweet.

    1/ At the risk of sounding like Mike Myers’ famous SNL talk-show host Linda Richman, “Mueller’s final Trump-Russia report” is neither “Mueller’s,” final, about “Trump-Russia” or a “report.” So all the breathless “reporting” today suggesting otherwise is inaccurate and misleading.

    2/ What we call the “Trump-Russia” investigation is a web of criminal, counterintelligence, and Congressional investigations that intersect with the work of the Special Counsel’s Office. So there are three key “c”-words here—”criminal,” “counterintelligence,” and “Congressional.”

    3/ Special Counsel Mueller is part of the “criminal” investigation; Mueller’s work *intersects* with the “counterintelligence” investigation; and his work feeds into and draws from the Congressional investigation. And here’s the key: all three of these investigations are ongoing.

    4/ As part of the “criminal” investigation, Mueller investigated some things his office then prosecuted; he investigated some things his office handed off to others; he investigated some things he chose not to prosecute; he investigated some things he is letting Congress handle.

    5/ Mueller’s “criminal” investigations—that is, the information he derived during his nearly 24 months of *criminal investigative work*—then fed directly into multiple “counterintelligence” investigations and will undoubtedly feed into many ongoing “Congressional” investigations.

    6/ The news we got today is that Mueller will not *himself* be bringing any more indictments. That’s it. That’s *all* that has just happened. Any reporting that says the “Russia probe is done” is false. Any reporting that “Mueller’s work is done” is false. It is only what I said.

    7/ Focusing *exclusively* on what Mueller’s office will be doing going forward and *exclusively* on the criminal investigation—so, a small part of what we somewhat misleadingly call the “Trump-Russia scandal”—we can see that Mueller may be done indicting (*maybe*) but that’s it.

    8/ As of today, Mueller had ten attorneys working for him (himself not included, I believe) down from seventeen originally. But we found out this week that certain attorneys who “left” his Office will *still be doing work for it*. Why? Because the Office has some work left to do.

    9/ That Office, whether still formally constituted or not, will see its attorneys prosecute Roger Stone in November, eight months from now. It will see its cooperating witness Rick Gates participate in “multiple” ongoing federal criminal investigations. And that’s just the start:

    10/ The Office will see its cooperating witness Mike Flynn testify in the Kian trial in July (Kian was a NatSec official on Trump’s transition team whose case intersects with all the other parts of the Trump-Russia investigation). Flynn is also involved in *multiple* other cases.

    11/ The Office will continue to pursue grand jury testimony from a Roger Stone witness, and continue to pursue a substantial trove of documents (for its grand jury, which is seated through July as far as was last reported) from an as-yet unnamed state-owned foreign corporation.

    12/ The Office has—it appears—referred to DOJ for prosecution at least one man it previously promised to prosecute (Corsi) and presumably has referred to DOJ for *possible* prosecution a whole host of “Trumpworld” figures who Congress has recently accused of perjuring themselves.

    13/ We also heard from major media over the past few weeks that Bob Mueller’s office was referring out an unknown number of new cases to other federal prosecutors, including presumably—based on past cooperation and information-sharing practices—prosecutors in SDNY, EDVA, and DC.

    14/ We *also* know from major media that there are many ongoing cases for which Mueller’s office conducted some of the investigation, all of the investigation, or shared information with the case’s primary investigators, such as Cohen’s SDNY cases and the Maria Butina case in DC.

    15/ What some in the media decided—I do not know why—is that the only cases they would associate with Mueller would be (a) indictments Mueller’s office brought, (b) that were completed before he issued any report to the DOJ, and (c) immediately (on their face) involved collusion.

    16/ So you have reporters today blithely saying that “Mueller is done” when Mueller will be prosecuting Roger Stone for most of 2019. You have reporters saying “he’s done” when cases he initiated are not only ongoing in multiple jurisdictions but may well provide new intel there.

    17/ If Roger Stone decides to cooperate—before or after conviction—that’s Mueller. The same is true for Kian. The same is even true for Manafort (who can cooperate to reduce his sentence for the next year). But the same is also true for the many cases Gates and Flynn are working.

    18/ The same is true for Butina. And for indictments that arise from the ongoing counterintelligence investigation(s). Or any new criminal referrals that go from Congress to DOJ. The same is true for cases Mueller began—that then went elsewhere—that could lead to new indictments.

    19/ The same is true for any cases that Mueller passed directly on to DOJ to let DOJ decide whether to prosecute them or not. In short, media can tell us today that *Mueller himself* will bring no new indictments—but even that might be conditioned by what happens in Stone’s case.

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  4. CSK says:

    @Gustopher:
    Trump may well have been just a useful idiot. Putin is an evil guy, but he’s a hell of a lot smarter than Trump. He knows that Trump is a stupid, narcissistic, easily manipulated, and impulsive blabbermouth. Would you trust Trump with the details of any kind of scheme? He’d be be yelling about it on Twitter two minutes later.

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  5. de stijl says:

    I have stockpiled so much popcorn.

    The crows coming home to roost will be well fed.

  6. Paul L. says:

    Guess the FISA warrant and IC did not deliver the goods.
    Time to repost this from michael reynolds

    By the way, here’s a nice lollipop for you two to suck on: the Feds and the NY State AG both now have the evidence. Do you understand what that means? It doesn’t disappear even if Mueller does. It’s too late for Trump to fire Mueller and have it work. We have reached the Nixon Tapes moment, the tipping point, when it is too late. You’re not getting it (what a shock) but it is too damn late.
    Let me tell you how this all looks five years down the road. Trump will absolutely own the worst president spot. That is baked in. That is unstoppable. If he cured cancer he’d still own last place. He will also dethrone Warren G. Harding as our most corrupt president ever.
    We will be deluged with tell-all books from ex-Trumpies spilling their guts and telling horror stories of their time in the White House. Just about everything the media has reported will be shown to be true.
    The entire Trump phenomenon will be seen as a cautionary tale in the danger of a careless and uninformed electorate. You, Eric, and you Paul, and all you ‘base’ Trumpaloons, will be a national embarrassment. We’ll all be trying to pretend people like you didn’t really exist. We’ll need that pretense to regain some shred of national pride.
    And a few dozen angry old white guys with too many guns and not enough Metamucil will decide to water the tree of liberty by murdering some people. They’ll give themselves some melodramatic name and assemble in Waco. I hear there’s a somewhat fire-damaged compound available, cheap.
    Pardon, Resign, Flee. That’s the closest thing to a good move for Trump now.

    By the way, here’s a nice lollipop for you two to suck on: the Feds and the NY State AG both now have the evidence. Do you understand what that means? It doesn’t disappear even if Mueller does. It’s too late for Trump to fire Mueller and have it work. We have reached the Nixon Tapes moment, the tipping point, when it is too late. You’re not getting it (what a shock) but it is too damn late.
    Let me tell you how this all looks five years down the road. Trump will absolutely own the worst president spot. That is baked in. That is unstoppable. If he cured cancer he’d still own last place. He will also dethrone Warren G. Harding as our most corrupt president ever.
    We will be deluged with tell-all books from ex-Trumpies spilling their guts and telling horror stories of their time in the White House. Just about everything the media has reported will be shown to be true.
    The entire Trump phenomenon will be seen as a cautionary tale in the danger of a careless and uninformed electorate. You, Eric, and you Paul, and all you ‘base’ Trumpaloons, will be a national embarrassment. We’ll all be trying to pretend people like you didn’t really exist. We’ll need that pretense to regain some shred of national pride.
    And a few dozen angry old white guys with too many guns and not enough Metamucil will decide to water the tree of liberty by murdering some people. They’ll give themselves some melodramatic name and assemble in Waco. I hear there’s a somewhat fire-damaged compound available, cheap.
    Pardon, Resign, Flee. That’s the closest thing to a good move for Trump now.

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  7. de stijl says:

    In the net so far:

    Flynn
    Gates
    Papadopolous
    Cohen (actually him x2: separately, hush money to Daniels and also lying to Congress)
    Manafort

    Roger Stone is a Trump adjunct (and the likely conduit to Wikileak) unless he pulls a miracle Perry Mason Chewbacca defense is gonna be sportin’ orange soon. Corsi will soon be calculating “what is (8′ x 12′) / 2 in cubic feet” in his head.

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  8. de stijl says:

    @Paul L.:

    Perception -1

    A post so nice you cited it twice.

  9. Guarneri says:

    Shorter:

    You got nothing. Never have, never will. You made fools of yourselves. Reynolds: Exhibit A.

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  10. de stijl says:

    Vox is not everyone’s cup of tea, but this a straight backgrounder on The Mueller report and what it will likely cover and what it won’t.

    https://www.vox.com/2019/2/22/18176845/mueller-report-explained-trump-russia-investigation

  11. de stijl says:
  12. James Pearce says:

    Reports say no further indictments are forthcoming.

    @Guarneri:

    You got nothing.

    Well, they got a dozen senators running for president and the rest of the weekend to get seriously drunk. That’s not nothing.

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  13. Teve says:

    @de stijl: that’s a good summary of what’s known right now. Personally, my favorite element of the whole thing is how Trump’s lawyers told Mueller that Trump couldn’t testify because he can’t stop lying.

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  14. de stijl says:

    @Teve:

    Lawyers prefer not to be disbarred nor fired by their client. They hoe a narrow row.

    By choice it should be noted.

  15. Kari Q says:

    Benjamin Wittes at Lawfare has a good post that conclusively states that we don’t know any more than we did yesterday.

  16. Tyrell says:

    Here are some factors of the Mueller “report”:
    The report is released on Friday, March 22. Why is that significant? Think about what the nation’s attention is turned to. One of the most important sports days of the year as NCAA basketball bracket games get going full steam.
    No more indictments? This thing fizzled out like a July firecracker in a thunderstorm.
    Any member of Congress who approved this farce and voted for it … owes the American people an apology and some money.
    There should be no more of these type of investigations. Any investigation should be approved by two thirds of the Congress and should be carried out by an independent committee, not politicians or career Washington bureaucrats. Mueller has a great military record, but he is a Washington insider and has political interests. Now I hear that Congress is planning more of these sort of shindigs. You can bet that these will go into every area and gather private information from every source of social media, communications, personal records, tax returns, memberships, school records. All levels of the people will be subject, not just Trump.
    There is something else behind all of this.
    *As my math teacher would say: “a big fat F:
    “It’s all for nothing; all for nothing” (Martin Howe “High Noon”)

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  17. Inhumans99 says:

    @Tyrell:

    Dude…chillax. You and others on this site sure do seem to be freaking out over what you are calling a nothing burger.

  18. An Interested Party says:

    Let me tell you how this all looks five years down the road. Trump will absolutely own the worst president spot. That is baked in. That is unstoppable.

    We don’t even have to wait five years for that…it is already obvious that he is the worst president in American history…much of what Michael wrote is true, so thanks for double posting it again…

    You got nothing.

    It is hardly surprising that someone who has regularly linked to a Russian propaganda website would draw this erroneous conclusion…

    Well, they got a dozen senators running for president and the rest of the weekend to get seriously drunk. That’s not nothing.

    Awww…bless your heart, you contrarian you…

    Personally, my favorite element of the whole thing is how Trump’s lawyers told Mueller that Trump couldn’t testify because he can’t stop lying.

    Wow, that’s the most truthful thing his lawyers have ever said…

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  19. de stijl says:

    @Tyrell:

    The report is released on Friday, March 22. Why is that significant? Think about what the nation’s attention is turned to. One of the most important sports days of the year as NCAA basketball bracket games get going full steam.

    OMFG. He said that.

  20. Kathy says:

    Remember that when Nixon was named an unindicted co-conspirator, the fact was kept sealed and not released publicly for some time.

    I’m not saying we can assume El Cheeto has been named an unindicted co-conspirator in any of the known criminal cases arising from the Mueller probe, or any of the indictments under seal, but we can’t assume that he has not been named one.

    I wonder if he knows.

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  21. de stijl says:

    @Tyrell:

    There should be no more of these type of investigations. Any investigation should be approved by two thirds of the Congress and should be carried out by an independent committee, not politicians or career Washington bureaucrats. Mueller has a great military record, but he is a Washington insider and has political interests. Now I hear that Congress is planning more of these sort of shindigs. You can bet that these will go into every area and gather private information from every source of social media, communications, personal records, tax returns, memberships, school records. All levels of the people will be subject, not just Trump.

    I think you lean towards Authoritarianism. Pretty clear, actually. Judging by your past commentary it was sure.

  22. Teve says:

    @de stijl: I was really going to focus on Trump’s international crime ring, the 37 indictments, Russian cyber attacks, Kushner’s scheming to give nuke technology to the dictators who bailed out his company, Chinese sex trafficking, Trump stealing from his own charity, tax fraud, bank fraud…

    …but Duke vs. North Dakota State was on. A brilliant ruse by the Deep State 😡

  23. Eric Florack says:

    So, both Rachel Maddow and Bill Kristol are on suicide watch?

    (Snicker)

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  24. Andy says:

    I definitely think the report I haven’t read supports the conclusions of the exact politics I hold and have been arguing for all this time. I love to be proven right!

    Genius.

    I’ve waited almost two years, I can certainly wait a while longer before putting my foot in my mouth.

  25. de stijl says:

    @Teve:

    I got focused when the Gophers beat Louisville – the son beat the father. That’s one of those Greek plays, possibly I think, one of the good ones.

  26. Teve says:
  27. Michael Reynolds says:

    @Paul L.:
    I stand by it.

    You don’t know the story because you live in a bubble. Just wait. That’s all you have to do.

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  28. Eric Florack says:

    @Michael Reynolds: and you don’t?

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  29. de stijl says:

    @Michael Reynolds:

    Say it twice. He might get it then. How does one respond when rando quotes major blockquote back at you months after the fact. Twice. Twice has to be worse, right?

    Quoting one back at oneself can be super effective, but also super creepy. Dude just saved up a quote to deploy against you when he thought it would be most rhetorically effective. And then f*cked up and pasted it twice like a schlub and never noticed, thought they had the high ground, hit “Post Comment” did CTRL+V once more for luck and oopsie now you look like a stalker.

    Paul L has been creepin’ and held onto that quote for a reason.

  30. Eric Florack says:

    What we’re seeing in terms of reaction from Democrats as regards the Mueller report being released, reminds one of several different images.

    # Marvin the Martian ( Where was the kaboom? There was supposed to be an earth-shattering kaboom!!)

    # The Black Knight from Monty Python’s holy Grail…( “The Black Knight always triumphs!!! Have at you! I’ll bite your legs off!”)

    # Captain Ahab… (All that most maddens and torments; all that stirs up the lees of things; all truth with malice in it; all that cracks the sinews and cakes the brain; all the subtle demonisms of life and thought; all evil, to crazy Ahab, were visibly personified, and made practically assailable in Moby-Dick. He piled upon the whale’s white hump the sum of all the general rage and hate felt by his whole race from Adam down; and then, as if his chest had been a mortar, he burst his hot heart’s shell upon it.)

    Will there be an admission of guilt and an apology coming from those who perpetrated and extended the life of this nearly three-year and 675 million-dollar hoax?

    No.

    As Reynolds has demonstrated for us, the ego of the defeated will not allow for apology here.  Such an apology requires by definition an admission that they were wrong, and they will never admit is that the whole thing was a hoax, by and large one they were taken in by as well, albeit willingly.

    It’s time for the country to heal. The problem is the cure. The only way to heal a cancer patient is to excise the cancer. That means there needs to be serious legal repercussions so this two-year-long 675 million dollar hoax perpetrated on the American people.

    What needs to happen is heavy legal consequences for these things, a public reckoning. The image of the perpetrators of this hoax and those that the hoax protected, being frog marched off to the vertical bar hotel for a stay of many years.

    Alas!, I fear what will happen is the charges from the left… (and in this I include the GOP establishment) …will get more crazy, we will see more Democrats foaming at the mouth. The volume on the left has been turned up to 11 for the past couple of years. History has shown us that every time they’ve lost like this, they turn the volume up still one more notch. Of course, that causes the charges to get more and more distorted, and more senseless.

    But, such is today’s Democratic Party.

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  31. de stijl says:

    Here is a RadioHead cover of Ceremony. They super lean into the catharsis here. I like this a lot.

    RadioHead: Ceremony (Joy Division / New Order cover)
    https://youtu.be/cedNya7e8Uc

    Not as much as the original*, but that’s a really good take. Joy Division had at least three takes on this, and New Order has at minimum two.

    Ceremony is a really good song and is really fun to play. (is it right to feel that a really sad song is fun to play?)

  32. Eric Florack says:

    @Tyrell: no, it’s not all for nothing. This was a politically-motivated action, and the bottom line is that its entire purpose was to create an illusion, and in that it’s been wildly successful.

    If their little fishing expedition had actually managed to come up with something, that would have been sauce for the goose.

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  33. de stijl says:

    I’ve never paid much attention to RadioHead. They do have an awesome drummer.

    They did well in their cover of Ceremony. Well done, lads.

    —–

    This is the canonical Joy Division version of Ceremony
    https://youtu.be/cedNya7e8Uc

    My first introduction was via the New Order 45 version. This is not that version, but this is really close: (also really good drummer)

    https://youtu.be/fi33-cITS0s

  34. de stijl says:

    @Eric Florack:

    You’d been saving up. This was your magnus opus.

    You went with three examples that were not applicable but apparently made sense in Florack world.

    Then:

    As Reynolds has demonstrated for us, the ego of the defeated will not allow for apology here.

    If you want to ding someone, do it. I have no idea what the thing you said means: you set up Reynolds as the bad guy and therefore demonstrative of something …, and then went with:

    the ego of the defeated will not allow for apology here

    Those words in that order sound semi bad-ass but mean nothing. I presume you’re trying to be bad ass, but that phrase is super ambiguous.

    I presume you’re trying to be defiant and super Eff Y’all, but you failed at even being anywhere close to being on point.

    I have high standards.

    If you want to be salty, be effing good at it. You are not.

  35. Bruce Henry says:

    So now the RWNJ line is that the Mueller investigation cost “675 million?”
    https://www.politifact.com/truth-o-meter/article/2018/dec/14/how-much-mueller-investigation-costing-updated/

    What a dumbass

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  36. Teve says:

    @Bruce Henry: I thought it was weird that Mueller got to work in a stretch Lamborghini!

  37. de stijl says:

    RadioHead’s new to me awesome drummer is Philip Selway and that dude kicks butt.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Philip_Selway

    Stephen Morris of Joy Division and New Order is superb. He is deity level drummer.

    The Perfect Kiss by New Order. Percussion aplenty, and good stuff too.

    https://youtu.be/x3XW6NLILqo

  38. de stijl says:

    I cannot percuss. I am not the world’s shittiest drummer, but I’m really, really bad at it. It’s entirely possible that I was the planet’s second worst percussionist ever. Face it, I am the shittiest.

    I cannot for the life of me keep a stable beat. I always speed up when I shouldn’t. And you have to manage both your feet and your hands to work rhythmically somehow together but not. I cannot do that. I will never be able to do that. People that can are are magic and blessed. Shine on!

    I look at them in wonder. How can you do that?

  39. Teve says:

    @Bruce Henry: The Mueller investigation took 675 days. Florack just got confused because he huffs so much glue he’s been banned from the local Hobby Lobby.

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  40. Eric Florack says:

    @Teve: had you forgotten the FBI portion of the “investigation” before Mueller was appointed?

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  41. Eric Florack says:
  42. Eric Florack says:

    About 12 years ago I gave Glenn Greenwald the title of being the least honest blogger in the ‘sphere. As far as I’m concerned that’s a position he still holds.

    That said, even he has had enough of this Russia conspiracy nonsense…

    Glenn Greenwald

    @ggreenwald

    The Mueller investigation is complete and this is a simple fact that will never go away: not one single American was charged, indicted or convicted for conspiring with Russia to influence the 2016 election – not even a low-level volunteer. The number is zero.

    Compare what cable hosts (let’s leave them unnamed) & Democratic operatives spent two years claiming this would lead to – the imprisonment of Don, Jr., Jared, even Trump on conspiracy-with-Russia charges – to what it actually produced. A huge media reckoning is owed.

    Don’t even try to pretend the point of the Mueller investigation from the start wasn’t to obtain prosecutions of Americans guilty of conspiring with Russia to influence the outcome of the election or that Putin controlled Trump through blackmail. Nobody will believe your denials.

    Are we now ready to rid ourselves of the thrilling espionage fantasy that Trump is controlled by Putin and the Kremlin using blackmail? There’s no way Robert Mueller would have gone 18 months without telling anyone about this if it were true, right? How could that be justified?

    The desperate attempts to salvage something from this debacle by the Mueller dead-enders are just sad. Yes, the public hasn’t read the Mueller report. But we *know* he ended his investigation without indicting a single American for conspiring with Russia to influence the election.

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  43. James Joyner says:

    @Eric Florack:

    About 12 years ago I gave Glenn Greenwald the title of being the least honest blogger in the ‘sphere. As far as I’m concerned that’s a position he still holds.

    That said, even he has had enough of this Russia conspiracy nonsense…

    Greenwald is the de facto American front man for the FSB’s Wikileaks operation.

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  44. wr says:

    @Eric Florack: Don’t you think you might want to wait until someone has actually read this report before doing your little dance? Maybe I’m missing something, but I don’t get the logic that if the report is finished, Trump is cleared.

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  45. Michael Reynolds says:

    @Eric Florack:
    No, I don’t. In fact I spend a lot of my time ensuring that I’m not in a bubble. I read widely, I spend hours I don’t always have to spare taking on data. My Google Chrome start page has eight shortcuts: WaPo, NYT, Twitter, Daily Beast, Politico, Axios, Booman and OTB. My autofills include Real Clear Politics (for their selection of articles and the polls,) Five Thirty Eight, WSJ, BBC, The Hill, The Guardian, Haaretz, even Drudge, and many more that don’t come to mind.

    I read history. I kill time watching YouTube videos on history, design, engineering, sociology, philosophy, even math and physics which for me ain’t easy. And of course I’ve been a political junkie for 48 years. Almost any time I express an opinion, I’ve already subjected it to rigorous cross-examination. And a big part of the reason I come here is to have James and Doug and Steven feed me ideas, concepts, which are then hashed out in comments by a bunch of very smart people and you.

    It’s not just that I’m smarter than you are, Eric, I also work a hell of a lot harder at learning, at understanding. Like most things in life, if you’re going to be good at something you need some talent or ability, and then you pile on a bunch of work and self-discipline. I don’t know where people got the idea that lazy, ill-informed prejudice is as valid as knowledge-based reason, but just to be clear: you’re wrong. See, if let’s say @Kylopod writes something I know he (she?) puts a lot of thought into it. You? You vomit up whatever Rush or Breitbart or Hannity fed you. No wonder you think everyone’s in a bubble like you, Eric, you’re lazy. You’re lazy and you insist on trying to match wits with people who aren’t.

    So: go do some work, Eric. Like a big boy. Go do the fcking work the rest of us do.

    10
    4
  46. Teve says:

    @wr:

    Maybe I’m missing something, but I don’t get the logic that if the report is finished, Trump is cleared.

    That’s because you haven’t huffed enough paint. Might I suggest a ’95 Glidden semi-gloss?

  47. Teve says:

    Kevin M. Kruse
    @KevinMKruse
    ·
    8m
    I’m going to be watching March Madness for the next (checks watch) eleven or twelve hours straight, so if there’s any breaking news on the Mueller Report, somebody please ask Jim Nantz to mention it.

  48. Just nutha ignint cracker says:

    @Gustopher: “… with Trump exhonerated”

    Do you honestly believe that guys like Reynolds will ever accept the idea of Trump standing as exonerated? Really?

    ETA: Shorter Seth Abramson: It’ll NEVER be over, just like Benghazi, just like her emails.

  49. Just nutha ignint cracker says:

    @Inhumans99: My prediction is that we have about 17 or so months during which we will be rehashing this nothingburger. Gonna be a lot of comments to skip over the next few months.

    ETA: “I wonder if he knows?”

    Epistemologically or metaphysically? Obviously no for the first (still sealed right now) but only a maybe even on the second.

  50. Michael Reynolds says:

    @Just nutha ignint cracker:
    If he’s exonerated of course I’ll accept it. I have no choice but to accept reality.

  51. mattbernius says:

    @Eric Florack:

    That means there needs to be serious legal repercussions so this two-year-long 675 million dollar hoax perpetrated on the American people.

    Noted leftist publication the Wall Street Journal that by last October the known cost of the investigation at $25 million. They note that the monthly cost is approximately $1.4 million a month.

    https://www.wsj.com/video/mueller-investigation-674-days-and-other-numbers-to-remember/FFA14395-4195-4324-9080-DC3F70A34A16.html

    BTW for comparison, by the end of it, the Clinton Investigation cost approximately $40 million. I’m sure you felt that money was well spent.

  52. Tyrell says:

    @Teve: March Madness: exactly what I will be fixated with also – television, computer website video feeds, and radio. I would venture to guess 80% or more of the people will be watching. That is a point I made about the timing of the Mueller “report” release.

  53. mattbernius says:

    Also, I have no idea where the WaPo is getting the $16.7 million in that article you linked to @Eric Florack. The two government docs (the two pdf reports) that they are drawing that number from list amounts significantly less than the WaPo says they do (perhaps they were revised down).

    Additionally, later disclosures have set the cost of the investigation far lower based on other government docs (see the above WSJ report or https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/politics/2019/02/12/mueller-russia-investigation-costs/2736507002/ ).

    Perhaps you could find another news source to back up your claim.

  54. Teve says:

    @mattbernius: Florack got his numbers confused. Between the date Mueller was appointed, May 17, 2017, and yesterday, March 22, 2019, was 675 days.

  55. Moosebreath says:

    @mattbernius:

    “I’m sure you felt that money was well spent.”

    I’m sure bithead thinks it was very well spent. It gave the so-called liberal media enough reasons to attack Hillary and ignore Trumps far worse conduct to make sure Trump got elected.

    @Eric Florack:

    “Will there be an admission of guilt and an apology coming from those who perpetrated and extended the life of this nearly three-year and 675 million-dollar hoax?”

    You first. I want 8 apologies from every Republican in Congress. One for each Benghazi investigation.

  56. Bruce Henry says:

    LOL Florack responds to proof his claim of $675 million was bogus with a link that says one year cost $16.7 million. That would make a 2 year investigation come in at around $33 million, or am I an innumerate idiot?

    Oh, wait, no, that’s not me, it’s Florack.

  57. mattbernius says:

    @Teve:
    Based on other posts in the thread it looks like he’s in his usual, I wrote something wrong but can’t admit it was wrong so let me move the goal posts by saying “I was always looping all related FBI investigations into a single number” (even though that’s not what the sources he was citing were doing).

  58. Teve says:

    @mattbernius: Nobody looks bad when they just make a mistake. We all make mistakes. But when you make an obvious mistake, and everybody can tell it’s a mistake, and you can tell it’s a mistake, and you refuse to admit it, and keep saying bullshit thing after bullshit thing to try to pretend it isn’t a mistake, that’s when you look bad.

  59. Just nutha ignint cracker says:

    @Michael Reynolds: I hope so, but I’ll believe it when I see it. I really just don’t think you’re likely to admit exoneration, and with this type of thing, there’s always a thread upon which to hold.

  60. Just nutha ignint cracker says:

    @Tyrell: “80% will be watching.”
    Which would make the Second Round of the NCAA men’s tourney the highest rated show ever in the history of television. I like hyperbole as much as anyone, but gimme a break here.