China’s Traffic Jam Ends, More On The Way

The traffic jam that snarled traffic outside Beijing for eleven days has mysteriously vanished.   But, the Economist says, it won’t be the last.

Roadworks and booming demand for coal and other goods sent thousands of lorries heading for China’s capital. Beijing is set to spend 80 billion yuan ($11.8 billion) on transport infrastructure in 2010—but it may not be enough. In recent years rising vehicle ownership has outpaced the growth of China’s express highway system by a distance. China’s new motoring class may have to get used to spending many more hours behind the wheel than they might otherwise intend.

This chart tells the story:

FILED UNDER: Asia, Quick Takes
James Joyner
About James Joyner
James Joyner is Professor and Department Head of Security Studies at Marine Corps University's Command and Staff College and a nonresident senior fellow at the Scowcroft Center for Strategy and Security at the Atlantic Council. He's a former Army officer and Desert Storm vet. Views expressed here are his own. Follow James on Twitter @DrJJoyner.