Least Shocking News of the Day: Hispanics don’t Like Trump

Via Gallup:  Trump Has a Major Image Problem With Hispanics

160311_Net_Favorable_3

And it goes well beyond party affiliation:

Hispanics tilt Democratic, with 50% identifying as Democratic or leaning Democratic in the Jan. 2-March 8 period, contrasted with 23% who identify as Republican or who lean Republican. Trump’s negative image, however, is not merely a result of Hispanics’ Democratic political orientation — evident in the substantially more positive images that Hispanics have of the other three Republican candidates. Two of these — Rubio and Kasich — actually have slightly more positive than negative ratings, while Cruz’s image tilts just slightly negative.

Trump also has significant image issues among the relatively small group of Hispanic Republicans interviewed in this period. He is the only one of the four GOP candidates with a negative image among Hispanic Republicans, with a net favorable rating of -29. By contrast, Rubio, Cruz and Kasich all have net positive images among Hispanic Republicans, with Rubio’s +34 the best of the group. Trump is significantly less popular with Hispanic Republicans than the two Democratic candidates in the race, Clinton and Bernie Sanders.

Emphasis mine.

FILED UNDER: Campaign 2016, Quick Takes, US Politics
Steven L. Taylor
About Steven L. Taylor
Steven L. Taylor is a Professor of Political Science and a College of Arts and Sciences Dean. His main areas of expertise include parties, elections, and the institutional design of democracies. His most recent book is the co-authored A Different Democracy: American Government in a 31-Country Perspective. He earned his Ph.D. from the University of Texas and his BA from the University of California, Irvine. He has been blogging since 2003 (originally at the now defunct Poliblog). Follow Steven on Twitter

Comments

  1. Ron Beasley says:

    The Republican party has been morphing from the the party of Lincoln to the party of Jefferson Davis since Nixon. Trump has simply thrown a match on this fuel. The old confederacy never died but has been in a kind of remission. The Bundy gang of outlaws is another example of this.

  2. Gustopher says:

    Who are the real racists — the Hispanic Republicans who only like Hispanic Republican Candidates, or Donald Trump?

    This is classic identity politics, and it is just part of the divisiveness created by Obama.

  3. Gustopher says:

    @Ron Beasley: “Fun” thing to consider — would Roosevelt have gotten any of the New Deal passed without the support of the racist Democrats?

    They’re a big voting block, and whoever can get them to angrily vote for them without thinking has had a huge lead in getting their policies enacted. It’s falling apart now, but it is pretty much the story of the 20th century: whoever can fleece the racists wins.

  4. JohnMcC says:

    @Gustopher: What you say about the Roosevelt “New Deal” coalition is true. As a result of the ‘Dixicrat’ wing, Social Security did not cover railroad worker nor agricultural or domestic workers as these occupational categories were principally African American.

    Unfortunately, what you say is irrelevant. Lyndon Johnson and Richard Nixon split the dixicrats off the D-party and fastened them onto the Repubs. This happened about 45 years ago.

  5. @Gustopher:

    Who are the real racists — the Hispanic Republicans who only like Hispanic Republican Candidates, or Donald Trump?

    That’s an exceedingly easy question: Trump (and many of his supporters).

    Plus, Kasich has a net positive with Hispanic Republicans as well, which undercuts your point:

    By contrast, Rubio, Cruz and Kasich all have net positive images among Hispanic Republicans, with Rubio’s +34 the best of the group

  6. @Gustopher:

    would Roosevelt have gotten any of the New Deal passed without the support of the racist Democrats?

    Unfortunately, racism was pretty commonplace in the 1930s and 1940s (and codified into law), so pointing back then and trying to make a point about now on this topic is problematic, to say the least.

    Yes, there were a lot of virulently racist Democrats in 1940s. What they is supposed to tell us about Democrats or Republicans in 2016 is beyond me. It was closing in on a century ago.

  7. Gustopher says:

    @Steven L. Taylor: The shift of the racist rubes from supporting Democrats to supporting Republicans brought about Free Trade agreements, tax cuts on the wealthy, and a Supreme Court that supports big business interests over individuals.

    For the past century, the racist rubes got nothing for their support, other than a few dog whistles here and there. They got a little something with the dismantling of affirmative action, but I doubt that would have happened without the not-particularly-racist-just-kind-of-clueless crowd who think that everyone should pull themselves up by their bootstraps and that racism is mostly a thing of the past (the David Brooks crowd, rather than the David Duke crowd).

    For the past century, whichever party had brought along the racist rubes has dominated, and whoever was willing to make a deal with the devil would win. It is breaking down now as the demographics of the country change and the racist rubes want something more than just dog whistles.

    Which gives us Donald Trump. Brown people aren’t legitimate, we need to crack a few heads, Muslims are terrifying, and we need a wall that the Mexicans will pay for.

    The history of the last American century has been the history of who uses the racist rubes for what.

  8. @Gustopher: There a profound difference, which you are not making, between saying that people who were also racist voted for X, and saying people voted for X because they were racist.

    So, sure, many Democrats in the 1940s were racists, but that isn’t why they supported the New Deal.

    At the moment, Trump supporters in particular are being motivated by racism and xenophobia to do so.

    This is profoundly different.