Neil Armstrong Laid To Rest In Private Funeral

In another era, someone who arguably qualifies for the title of great explorer would’ve had his passing marked by a massive public ceremony. Consistent with his life long desire for privacy, though, Neil Armstrong was buried today in a ceremony attended by family, friends, and fellow astronauts:

CINCINNATI (AP) — Neil Armstrong was a humble hero who saw himself as a team player and never capitalized on his celebrity as the first man to walk on the moon, mourners said Friday outside a private service attended by fellow space pioneers, including his two crewmates on the historic Apollo 11 mission.

Hundreds of people attended a closed service for Armstrong Friday at a private club in suburban Cincinnati. A national memorial service has been scheduled for Sept. 12 in Washington, although no other details have been released on the service or burial plans for Armstrong. He died Saturday at age 82.

Among some 10 former astronauts attending Friday were John Glenn and Armstrong’s crew for the 1969 moon landing, Edwin “Buzz” Aldrin and Michael Collins.

“You’ll never get a hero, in my view, like Neil Armstrong,” said Apollo 8 astronaut Bill Anders, who praised Armstrong after the service for his wisdom and humility in the way he handled becoming a global icon. “It’s going to be hard to top.”

“America has truly lost a legend,” said Eugene Cernan, an Apollo astronaut who is the last man to have walked on the moon.

Sen. Rob Portman, an Ohio Republican, eulogized Armstrong “as a reluctant hero” and said afterward the service was a mix of emotion and humor, with Armstrong’s two sons talking about him as a father and grandfather.

“He touched the lives of so many,” Portman said.

“He was the embodiment of everything this nation is all about,” said NASA Administrator Charles Bolden. Armstrong, he said, had a courageous drive for exploration while being an “incredibly humble” man who probably wouldn’t have wanted all the attention of Friday’s service.

It included a Navy ceremonial guard, a bagpiper corps and songs including “When the Saints Go Marching In.” Four Navy fighter planes flew over at the end of the service, one flying upward in tribute to Armstrong, a former Navy pilot who flew combat missions in Korea.

Godspeed, sir.

FILED UNDER: General
Doug Mataconis
About Doug Mataconis
Doug Mataconis held a B.A. in Political Science from Rutgers University and J.D. from George Mason University School of Law. He joined the staff of OTB in May 2010 and contributed a staggering 16,483 posts before his retirement in January 2020. He passed for too young in July 2021.