Bolton and his Book

He is complaining that the White House is holding it up.

“Ambassador John Bolton Speaks to Press” by The White House is in the Public Domain, CC0

Via CNN: Bolton issues plea that his upcoming book isn’t ‘suppressed’ by White House.

John Bolton issued a rebuke against White House “censorship” of his book manuscript in his first public remarks since the impeachment inquiry into President Donald Trump concluded, and expressed uncertainty about whether the public will ever have an opportunity to read what he described as his “effort to write history.”

[…]

“I hope it’s not suppressed,” Bolton told the audience, referring to the White House’s review of his book.

“I say things in the manuscript about what he (Trump) said to me,” he added. “I hope they become public someday.”

Gee, if only there was some way to make things known to the public apart from publishing a book!

It is extremely difficult to take his protestations seriously. Mostly, it seems that either his previous hype scheme to drive up sales has backfired on him, or this is just more fuel for that fire.

It seems like he flirted with Senate testimony to jack up interest in his book, knowing full well the odds of him actually being called to testify were quite slim. But, in so doing he has earned the wrath of the Trump administration, who can now drag out the review process.

FILED UNDER: General
Steven L. Taylor
About Steven L. Taylor
Steven L. Taylor is Professor of Political Science and Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences at Troy University. His main areas of expertise include parties, elections, and the institutional design of democracies. His most recent book is the co-authored A Different Democracy: American Government in a 31-Country Perspective. He earned his Ph.D. from the University of Texas and his BA from the University of California, Irvine. He has been blogging since 2003 (originally at the now defunct Poliblog). Follow Steven on Twitter

Comments

  1. CSK says:

    I have read that Bolton’s literary reps, the Javelin Agency, negotiated a $2 million deal with Simon and Schuster early last November. This usually means that Bolton–or Javelin, actually–would have received half the advance on the signing of the contract, and the other half on delivery of the manuscript. This is far from the biggest sum that’s ever been paid for a book, but it’s nonetheless a substantial sum.

    S and S, under its Threshold Editions imprint, published Bolton’s last book in 2007. Threshold specializes in conservative titles.

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  2. An Interested Party says:

    If his protestations are true, this couldn’t be happening to a more deserving individual…it’s hardly surprising that sleaze from the Bush Administration would spread to the Trump Administration…

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  3. Kathy says:

    The former national security advisor doth protest too much, methinks.

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  4. Gustopher says:

    Unlike nearly everyone else who complains about censorship, Bolton is using the word correctly.

    Nice.

    Also, he has some decisions to make. The justice department just spent two years investigating Andrew McCabe, per the President’s tweeted request. I don’t think Bolton’s book will see the light of day, and I do think the justice department will try to prosecute him if he leaks it.

    Does he fight tyranny, bend the knee to a tyrant, or try to shake some hush money out of the tyrant?

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  5. Gustopher says:

    @Kathy:

    The former national security advisor doth protest too much, methinks.

    The former national security advisor and his ridiculous mustache doth protest not nearly enough, methinks.

    The President using the power of the government to silence his critics is not good. Not good at all.

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  6. OzarkHillbilly says:

    Pobrecito…

    @Gustopher: Funny how in this instance, as noted by Steven, that Bolton chose to be shut up, and now is complaining that he isn’t allowed to speak. He could have been a *hero,* now he won’t even be an afterthought.

    **ok ok, a wee bit of hyperbole. shoot me.

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  7. Daryl and his brother Darryl says:

    Republicans cannot do the right thing for their country, even when it’s easy and obvious.
    Bolton has always been a cancer on this nation…one only need look at the PNAC and how that turned into the biggest foreign policy debacle in our nations history.
    I hope that when his book does come out, no one buys it.
    I know I won’t.

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  8. OzarkHillbilly says:

    @Daryl and his brother Darryl: I might buy it once it hits 50 cents on the bargain shelf. It should be good tinder for the woodstove.

  9. Kathy says:

    @Gustopher:

    The President using the power of the government to silence his critics is not good. Not good at all.

    But there isn’t much even King Cheeto the Moron can do on that front.

    And there’s the old Soviet method of getting around censorship, only easier: smuggle (email) the manuscript to a free country and have it published there. You know, countries like Mexico, Canada, Guatemala, Honduras, Costa Rica, among dozens of others.

    If Bolton really wants to stick it to the Pervert in Chief, he can arrange for a publisher in Cuba or Venezuela to do it.

    Or he can show up to the next House committee that wants to ask him questions and talk to them.

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  10. Moosebreath says:

    @Gustopher:

    “I don’t think Bolton’s book will see the light of day”

    Certainly not before Election Day.

  11. CSK says:

    At http://www.theatlantic.com there’s an article by Davis A. Graham entitled “John Bolton Hints at How Much More He Still Has to Tell.”

  12. senyordave says:

    Bolton shows what a true patriot he is. Money comes first, then his country. He could have testified before a Congress, but he had to first make his money. IOW, he’ll do the right thing for money. Now he’s a scared little whiner. He deserves anything bad that comes to him. Truly pathetic.

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  13. senyordave says:

    @Kathy: If Bolton really wants to stick it to the Pervert in Chief, he can arrange for a publisher in Cuba or Venezuela to do it.

    Or he can show up to the next House committee that wants to ask him questions and talk to them.

    This would require some combination of courage and integrity,, both of which Bolton seems to be sorely lacking.
    Personally I think Trump’s people will cut him a deal, have him make some edits and walk away with a decent payday. Another problem solved.

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  14. Michael Reynolds says:

    Bolton is a patriot as long as he gets paid for his patriotism. But then that’s what we are discovering about conservatives generally, isn’t it? Their ethics, their morals, their cherished ideals are all for sale for cash or power. Fear of a mean Tweet and they curl up in fetal positions. Hypocrites, cowards and whores, your Republican Party.

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  15. Kathy says:

    @Michael Reynolds:

    You left out chicken-hawks.

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  16. Gustopher says:

    @Kathy:

    If Bolton really wants to stick it to the Pervert in Chief, he can arrange for a publisher in Cuba or Venezuela to do it.

    Do you have any doubt that this would cause the DOJ to spend years investigating him? And very likely prosecuting him for releasing classified information? There’s bound to be something classified in a yet-to-be-reviewed book by the former NSA. And if not, something will become classified just to prosecute.

    Or he can show up to the next House committee that wants to ask him questions and talk to them.

    Trump has shown that he is going to retaliate against witnesses. And the DOJ is going to help him if he has no other leverage. Even if they cannot find something to indict him on, being under federal investigation is not fun — See McCabe, Andrew and his two years of investigation.

    There are real costs involved in doing the right thing here, beyond lost book sales. I have little faith that Bolton’s patriotism will cause him to do the right thing. I do wonder whether he will eventually do the right thing out of spite.

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  17. DrDaveT says:

    Bolton issues plea that his upcoming book isn’t [sic] ‘suppressed’ by White House.

    DrDaveT issues plea that CNN learn how to use the subjunctive mood.

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  18. Kathy says:

    @Gustopher:

    There are real costs involved in doing the right thing here, beyond lost book sales.

    I agree. And would Bolton say “I want to get this information out, but I’m too scared of the Big Bad Cheeto,” I’d respect his honesty.

  19. Just nutha ignint cracker says:

    @Kathy I’m beginning to feel some discomfort about calling Republicans “chicken hawks.” While I hadn’t been bothered with the term in the past, the increased proliferation of vices Republicans have shown themselves capable of cause me to wonder about using the term as is common now.

    The thing is, a chicken hawk was something completely different from the tough talking coward that we currently talk about. Unfortunately, Republicans have begun to demonstrate the predilection to avail themselves of the other, earlier and more classic, version of the vice, too. For me this causes some level of cognitive dissonance in that I’m never sure about which vice is being referred to at any time. I don’t want to be holding the wrong impression about what we’re discussing.

    I would recommend the classic Paine term “sunshine patriot,” but I understand that it contains the word “patriot” and as a consequence may not carry enough negative connotation. It really poses a thorny problem, and I hope that someone will come up with a useful distinction between the two.

  20. CSK says:

    @Just nutha ignint cracker:
    There’s always “summertine soldier.”

  21. OzarkHillbilly says:

    @Just nutha ignint cracker:

    I would recommend the classic Paine term “sunshine patriot,” but I understand that it contains the word “patriot” and as a consequence may not carry enough negative connotation. It really poses a thorny problem, and I hope that someone will come up with a useful distinction between the two.

    I just go straight to “slime ball mf’er.”

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  22. Just nutha ignint cracker says:

    @OzarkHillbilly: As long as it’s only used for one category, that works for me. 😀

  23. Gustopher says:

    @Just nutha ignint cracker:

    I would recommend the classic Paine term “sunshine patriot,” but I understand that it contains the word “patriot” and as a consequence may not carry enough negative connotation.

    I don’t think a lot of good people are called patriots these days. And certainly not actual patriots.

    And if they describe themselves as a patriot… there’s basically zero chance they love America. They’re more likely to be a pedophile than a patriot, and there’s only like a 7% chance that they’re a pedophile.