Calderón and Legalization

While it is true, as Jacob Sullum puts it, On Drug Policy, Mexico's President Has a Bigger Vocabulary Than Ours, it is also true as the headline at Gancho puts it he has Problems with the Legalization Debate (specifically in terms of popular opinion in Mexico).

While it is true, as Jacob Sullum puts it, On Drug Policy, Mexico’s President Has a Bigger Vocabulary Than Ours, it is also true as the headline at Gancho puts it he has Problems with the Legalization Debate (specifically in terms of popular opinion in Mexico).

h/t:  Chris Lawrence and Greg Weeks for the links.

FILED UNDER: Borders and Immigration, Quick Takes, US Politics, , ,
Steven L. Taylor
About Steven L. Taylor
Steven L. Taylor is a Professor of Political Science and a College of Arts and Sciences Dean. His main areas of expertise include parties, elections, and the institutional design of democracies. His most recent book is the co-authored A Different Democracy: American Government in a 31-Country Perspective. He earned his Ph.D. from the University of Texas and his BA from the University of California, Irvine. He has been blogging since 2003 (originally at the now defunct Poliblog). Follow Steven on Twitter

Comments

  1. Zelsdorf Ragshaft III says:

    There seems to be a problem with what is going on with our southern neighbor.  While this President seems unwilling to do anything about it no matter what the damage to our nation, he will not be President forever.  Our next President might just place a large military force close to the border with about 1000 abrams tanks.  If Mexico cannot control the drug cartels and they intrude on our soil there is precident to take matters into our own hands like we did with Poncho Villa.  Mexico was not a country until established by Spain.  Mexican is not a race.

  2. André Kenji says:

    In fact, it´s not so easy. Colombia managed to curb SOME of the drug cartels because these were located inside the rainforest. But in Mexico these cartels operates in the cities(That´s the reason that no one in Rio de Janeiro controls these cartels. By the way, several civilians are being killed by military operations in the favelas).
    By the way, Mexican problems began when Calderon decided to take decisive action against the cartels.

  3. Max Lybbert says:

    Mexican problems began when Calderon decided to take decisive action against the cartels.

    Mexico’s had problems for a long time.
    Although things have improved over the years, there is still rampant corruption in local, state, and federal governments across the country.  It’s impossible for the Mexican government (or the governments of the various states for that matter) to implement any effective change without getting a handle on the corruption.