Titles

Economist Jeff Ely argues that short titles for academic papers signal seminal works, whereas longer, more complex titles are associated with derivative works.  From this, he advises:

First, find the simplest title not yet taken for your papers. One word titles are the best. Second, before you get started on a paper, think about the title. If you can’t come up with a short title for it then its probably not worth writing.

The absolute worst thing you can do with your title is to insert a colon into it. (quiet down beavis!) As in, Torture: A Model of Dynamic Commitment Problems. Or Kludged: Asymptotically Inefficient Evolution. In the first case you have just ruined a seminal-signaling one-word title by adding spurious specificity. In the second, you just took an intriguing one-world title and turned it into a yawner.

Sounds about right.

via Tyler Cowen

FILED UNDER: Economics and Business, Quick Takes,
James Joyner
About James Joyner
James Joyner is Professor and Department Head of Security Studies at Marine Corps University's Command and Staff College and a nonresident senior fellow at the Scowcroft Center for Strategy and Security at the Atlantic Council. He's a former Army officer and Desert Storm vet. Views expressed here are his own. Follow James on Twitter @DrJJoyner.

Comments

  1. Contracts says:

    Worst is the (fortunately rare) double colon, which usually occurs when the journal allows a title and a full subtitle. There is no way to make that look good in a citation.