Tuesday Tabs and Takes

Some stories and passing comments.

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“I don’t think he understands what he’s talking about most of the time,” said Greenhalgh. “He takes things and extrapolates them to a place that comes completely out of thin air. It sounds good and people believe it because it sounds authoritative if you don’t know much.”

Specifically, Kagan said, acting like a court means respecting precedent, applying judicial methodologies consistently and irrespective of outcome, and not lunging to make decisions more far-reaching than the pending case requires. “People are rightly suspicious if one justice leaves the court or dies and another justice takes his or her place and all of a sudden the law changes on you,” she said. “That doesn’t seem like law.”

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Steven L. Taylor
About Steven L. Taylor
Steven L. Taylor is a Professor of Political Science and a College of Arts and Sciences Dean. His main areas of expertise include parties, elections, and the institutional design of democracies. His most recent book is the co-authored A Different Democracy: American Government in a 31-Country Perspective. He earned his Ph.D. from the University of Texas and his BA from the University of California, Irvine. He has been blogging since 2003 (originally at the now defunct Poliblog). Follow Steven on Twitter

Comments

  1. Tony W says:

    On the abortion ban story, we see the typical Republican who is completely devoid of empathy and grace.

    She was adamantly anti-choice, until it affected her personally – after which she suddenly saw the light and decided that allowing doctors and patients to make medical decisions together was the right way to go.

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  2. CSK says:

    @Tony W:
    Sometimes that’s what it takes. It never before occurred to her that she’d be in the position of needing an abortion.

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  3. James Joyner says:

    Jennifer Rubin is just terrible. She was Ann Coultereque in her support of GOP excesses and has now swung completely the other way as if we can’t look up her old positions.

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  4. steve says:

    The story also demonstrates how it has tied the hands of physicians. You dont know when you can intervene. As it currently stands, it looks like you cant intervene until you can absolutely prove the mother was going die without intervention. That is hard to do and once a person reaches that stage it may not be reversible, and if reversible it may leave permanent damage.

    Steve

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  5. Kylopod says:

    Regnery (and more broadly its parent, Simon & Schuster) has been publishing far-right crap for decades. It’s interesting to me how much the new trend for election denial has changed the game and made them vulnerable to lawsuits in a way their previous content, no matter how egregious, simply wasn’t. I kind of wonder how they’ve navigated hate-speech laws in other countries where they might be published, but to my knowledge they haven’t run into serious legal trouble up to now.

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  6. OzarkHillbilly says:

    Ends up the abortion issue isn’t so simple. Via CNN: Once a ‘quintessential pro-life Texan,’ she had to flee her home state to get an abortion.

    Reality slaps a conservative upside their head and suddenly they have a change of heart? I am shocked, shocked I tell you!

    “People are rightly suspicious if one justice leaves the court or dies and another justice takes his or her place and all of a sudden the law changes on you,” she said. “That doesn’t seem like law.”

    QFT.

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  7. CSK says:

    @OzarkHillbilly:
    It’s not surprising, given her apparent level of self-absorption.

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  8. Jay L Gischer says:

    I loved that quote by Kagan. Not flashy, but right on the point. It’s probably the most interesting thing she’s written/said that I’ve read so far.

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  9. CSK says:

    Delete. Wrong thread.

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  10. MarkedMan says:

    @OzarkHillbilly: Per the article, she had the change of heart 7 years ago. It was only this year it affected her.

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  11. MarkedMan says:

    Oberlin and schools like it are so outside of my lived experience that I don’t even have an opinion on them academically. But I remember this story pretty well, and I think it is a good example of the difference between supporting an individual or a group, and supporting justice and fairness. They often seem to overlap, because if someone is discriminated against, it is only fair and just to fight for them. But you can tell the difference in a case like this. Oberlin as an institution and its leader individually clearly showed they have no real interest in justice and fairness, only in supporting the categories of people it has chosen.

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  12. OzarkHillbilly says:

    @MarkedMan: Ok, thanx for the clarification. Maybe she can can explain to the supercilious six that the rights of Americans shouldn’t vary according to their address.

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  13. Just nutha says:

    @MarkedMan: Even so, the change of heart sprouted from the realization that her tendency to miscarry made her situation problematic. Did she transfer ANY of that reality to the causes of women not her sisters or cousins?

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  14. MarkedMan says:

    @Just nutha: True. And it there does seem to be a truth that many people who self identify as Conservative don’t have much empathy for others. Something has to happen specifically to them or someone close to them in order for it to become “real” for them.

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  15. Just nutha ignint cracker says:

    @MarkedMan:

    Something has to happen specifically to them or someone close to them in order for it to become “real” for them.

    I don’t see that feature/bug/characteristic as unique to conservatives, but it certainly may be more common. At least it appears so publicly.

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  16. Gustopher says:

    @Just nutha ignint cracker: It’s more pointed with conservatives.

    Liberals will be in favor of more rehab clinics and halfway houses for nonviolent offenders and the like… provided that they don’t have to see them. It’s just not as exciting; the story just doesn’t have the same emotional punch.

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  17. Just nutha ignint cracker says:

    @Gustopher:

    Liberals will be in favor of more rehab clinics and halfway houses for nonviolent offenders and the like… provided that they don’t have to see them.

    Ayup! But I can see the point. They spent a lot of time and effort flipping houses and driving up property values to keep the riffraff out. Can’t be putting in services after they spent all that effort driving the people who use them out. Don’t make no sense.

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