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Reid Took Free Boxing Tickets Then Sponsored Boxing Bill

The scandal of the day is that Harry Reid, Nevada’s senior senator, took free boxing tickets worth thousands of dollars from his state’s boxing association while boxing legislation was pending before the Senate.

Senate Democratic Leader Harry M. Reid (Nev.) accepted free ringside tickets from the Nevada Athletic Commission to three professional boxing matches while that state agency was trying to influence him on federal regulation of boxing. Reid took the free seats for Las Vegas fights between 2003 and 2005 as he was pressing legislation to increase government oversight of the sport, including the creation of a federal boxing commission that Nevada’s agency feared might usurp its authority.

He defended the gifts, saying that they would never influence his position on the bill and he was simply trying to learn how his legislation might affect an important home state industry. “Anyone from Nevada would say I’m glad he is there taking care of the state’s number one businesses,” he said. “I love the fights anyways, so it wasn’t like being punished,” added the senator, a former boxer and boxing judge.

Senate ethics rules generally allow lawmakers to accept gifts from federal, state or local governments, but specifically warn against taking such gifts — particularly on multiple occasions — when they might be connected to efforts to influence official actions. “Senators and Senate staff should be wary of accepting any gift where it appears that the gift is motivated by a desire to reward, influence, or elicit favorable official action,” the Senate ethics manual states. It cites the 1990s example of an Oregon lawmaker who took gifts for personal use from a South Carolina state university and its president while that school was trying to influence his official actions. “Repeatedly taking gifts which the Gifts Rule otherwise permits to be accepted may, nonetheless, reflect discredit upon the institution, and should be avoided,” the manual states.

Several ethics experts said Reid should have paid for the tickets, which were close to the ring and worth between several hundred and several thousand dollars each, to avoid the appearance he was being influenced by gifts. Two senators who joined Reid for fights with the complimentary tickets took markedly differently steps. Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.) insisted on paying $1,400 for the tickets he shared with Reid for a 2004 championship fight. Sen. John Ensign (R-Nev.) accepted free tickets to another fight with Reid but already had recused himself from Reid’s federal boxing legislation because his father was an executive for a Las Vegas hotel that hosts fights.

[...]

Reid had separate meetings in June 2003 in his Senate offices with two Abramoff tribal clients and Edward Ayoob, a former staff member who went to work with Abramoff. The meetings occurred over a five-day span in which Ayoob also threw a fundraiser for Reid at the firm where Ayoob and Abramoff worked that netted numerous donations from Abramoff’s partners, firm and clients.

[...]

A few months after the fundraiser, Reid did sponsor a spending bill that targeted $100,000 to another Abramoff tribe, the Chitimacha of Louisiana, to pay for a soil erosion study for which Ayoob was lobbying. Reid said he sponsored the provision because Louisiana lawmakers sent him a letter requesting it.

[...]

Reid also wrote at least four letters favorable to Abramoff’s tribal clients around the time Reid collected donations from those clients and Abramoff’s partners, the Associated Press reported recently. Reid has declined to return the donations, unlike other lawmakers, saying his letters were consistent with his beliefs.

That a Senator who represents the gambling capital of America needed to be bribed to support this legislation, let alone that a man of his position could be bought for such a low price, strikes me as absurd. Still, given the tenor of the times, Reid showed poor judgment in not following the lead of McCain and Ensign on this one.

Judging by the early blogosphere reaction, I’m nearly alone in this view.

Ed Morrissey thinks this is just a further example of corruption in Washington and observes, “as long as Democrats continue to screech at corrupt Republicans while excusing the likes of Reid, Kennedy, Jefferson, and Mollohan, then nothing will ever change.”

John Hawkins is amazed at Reid’s softpeddling “being given thousands of dollars worth of free tickets from a company that was hoping to influence his judgement in the Senate. If that isn’t illegal it ought to be, because it makes Reid look crooked.”

Reid’s defenders so far seem to be comprised entirely of Josh Marshall and his henchman Paul Kiel. The latter notes that “there is an exception for gifts from governmental agencies (like the Nevada Athletic Commission) in the Senate ethics rules.” Furthermore, while Reid voted with his benefactors, he voted against them on the key matter they were apparently seeking to influence:

Reid was advocating “the creation of a federal boxing commission that Nevada’s agency feared might usurp its authority.” Reid never changed his position. And this was a dramatically uncontroversial piece of legislation largely preoccupied with ensuring the safety of boxers by creating the United States Boxing Administration. It passed the Senate unanimously.

Of course, this could simply make Reid the Shoeless Joe Jackson of the Senate, taking bribes and then failing to pay off. But, again, taking some tickets from his own state’s athletic commission certainly strikes me as small potatoes. And I’m not exactly a big fan of Harry Reid, at least in his Minority Leader incarnation.

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About James Joyner
James Joyner is the publisher of Outside the Beltway, an associate professor of security studies at the Marine Corps Command and Staff College, and a nonresident senior fellow at the Atlantic Council. He's a former Army officer and Desert Storm vet. He has a PhD in political science from The University of Alabama. Views expressed here are his own. Follow James on Twitter.

Comments

  1. Boxing Tickets Brouhaha…

    Reid Accepted Free Boxing Tickets While a Related Bill Was Pending
    Senate Democratic Leader Harry M. Reid (Nev.) accepted free ringside tickets from the Nevada Athletic Commission to three professional boxing matches while that state agency was trying…

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

  2. I’d pretty much agree with your gist, and I think it’s just the timing of the thing that makes it look worse than it is. Although his statement of “I love the fights anyways, so it wasn�t like being punished,” is counterintuitive as a defense.

    However, the situation underlines the fact that in this age of campaign and gift regulation that the line between acceptable and unacceptable becomes blurry.

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

  3. Bithead says:

    Small potatoes? Perhaps.
    But even at that size…. do you think for one moment that Reid himself wouldn’t be screaming bloody murder about a Republican doing exactly what he’s been caught at?

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

  4. Alan says:

    This is a complete non-story. Reid should be commended for actually trying to learn about the industry, rather than just sitting in DC and making shit up.

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

  5. More on the culture of corruption…

    … Democrat style:
    Senate Democratic Leader Harry M. Reid (Nev.) accepted free ringside tickets from the Nevada Athletic Commission to three professional boxing matches while that state agency was trying to influence him on federal regulation of b…

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

  6. TJIT says:

    Paul Kiel apparently thinks the fact that

    �there is an exception for gifts from governmental agencies (like the Nevada Athletic Commission) in the Senate ethics rules.�

    Should make us happy with Reid’s actions. In fact it provides just another example of the government placing itself above rules it applies to everyone else.

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

  7. Reid’s fight nights questioned…

    WASHINGTON — Sen. Harry Reid accepted free tickets from the Nevada Athletic Commission to thre…

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

  8. Iowa Voice says:

    “Culture Of Corruption” Meme Is Officially Over…

    Put a fork in this, the favorite meme/chant of the left. They can no longer safely say “culture of corruption” without having it bite them in the ass:

    Senate Democratic leader Harry Reid, who has criticized Republican ethics, accepted free ringsi…

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

  9. Surely Harry Reid Isn’t Involved in the “Culture of Corruption”…

    Please don’t tell me that Harry Reid is involved in “the culture of corruption.”  As my grandmother would say, “What’s the world coming to?”
    Well, according to John Solomon writings of “Reid Accepted Free Boxing Tickets While a Related …

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

  10. The $1400 represents about 0.8% of his governmental salary. If a salesman asked you out for a night of entertaining, spent 0.8% of your salary, and did this across multiple years, would you be more or less likely to use your influence for the company to buy from that salesman? Its only 0.8%, but then there are lots of salesmen. The fact that the GOP senators recognized the conflict should have sent up flairs for Reid.

    I suspect that someone will be reading the senate ethic rules very closely to decide if a protest should be filed.

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

  11. lily says:

    The idea that some kind of association with a client of Abramoff’s is in and of itself a bad thing is mistaken ( not that you said this but others have). It’s sort of like faulting someone for a legal arrangement they have with an individual who got cheated in an illegal deal by someone else. If Reid had direct dealngs with Abramoff there would be something to be upset about..

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  12. Anderson says:

    do you think for one moment that Reid himself wouldnâ??t be screaming bloody murder about a Republican doing exactly what heâ??s been caught at?

    Ah, the pathos of being Bithead.

    Remind me, please, who was saying that the FBI raid on Congressman Jefferson’s office was no big deal?

    (a) Trent Lott
    (b) Dennis Hastert
    (c) Harry Reid

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

  13. Bithead says:

    Remind me, please, who was saying that the FBI raid on Congressman Jeffersonâ??s office was no big deal?

    (a) Trent Lott
    (b) Dennis Hastert
    (c) Harry Reid

    See also: Blind pig, Acorn.
    Still that changes nothing.
    We’ll be told by those defending Dirty Harry, that what he did, as a technical matter, was not illegal. Somehow these same people will forget that neither was what Delay was charged with. But no matter for that, eh?

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

  14. Ring Side for Reid…

    Free Boxing Tickets for ring side!! Why not? You want a bill passed? It seems Senator Democratic LEADER Harry M. Reid did not mind being persuaded and/or influenced, no arm-twisting for Reid for free gifts. Between 2003 and 2005, Reid accepted FR ……..

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  15. The Sandbox says:

    What Culture Of Corruption?…

    From the AP:Senate Democratic Leader Harry M. Reid (Nev.) accepted free ringside tickets from the Nevada Athletic Commission to three professional boxing matches while that state agency was trying to influence him on federal regulation of boxing. Reid …

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  16. Bhoe says:

    Should make us happy with Reid�s actions. In fact it provides just another example of the government placing itself above rules it applies to everyone else.

    What in the world are you talking about?

    This is clearly NOT an example of “the government placing itself above rules it applies to everyone else.” There are ABSOLUTELY NO federal restrictions on the number & value of gifts that the Nevada Athletic COmmission can give to “everyone else.” The rules, in this case, ONLY apply to Senators–they have to meet, in actuality, a higher standard.

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

  17. TJIT says:

    BHOE,
    Quote from Paul Kiel’s article

    “Only, there is an exception for gifts from governmental agencies”

    So you and I have restrictions placed on what we can do and the Nevada gaming commision and other governmental agencies do not. That is what I was talking about.

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

  18. RogerD says:

    Of course, this could simply make Reid the Shoeless Joe Jackson of the Senate, taking bribes and then failing to pay off. But, again, taking some tickets from his own state�s athletic commission certainly strikes me as small potatoes. And I�m not exactly a big fan of Harry Reid, at least in his Minority Leader incarnation.

    You need to correct this post–it is terribly misleading. If you look at reporting on this issue, you would know that the “tickets” in question are VIP credentials WITH NO FACE VALUE. As the Las Vegas Review is reporting, it is illegal for the commission to accept money for those credentials.

    Also reported is the fact that when Reid accepted actual tickets to fights he always paid for them.

    This is a non-issue.

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

  19. Harry Reid on the Ropes? He accepted gifts from boxing promoters…

    The culture of corruption takes another blow, and once again it is a Democrat, Senate Democratic Leader Harry Reid.  He of course denies all wrong doing, but the timing here was no better or worse then most of the other recent ethics scandals…

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