A Photo for Friday

Mr. Orangutan and his Hat
“Mr. Oragnutan and his Hat”
February 8, 2020
Birmingham, AL
FILED UNDER: Photo for Friday, Photography
Steven L. Taylor
About Steven L. Taylor
Steven L. Taylor is Professor of Political Science and Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences at Troy University. His main areas of expertise include parties, elections, and the institutional design of democracies. His most recent book is the co-authored A Different Democracy: American Government in a 31-Country Perspective. He earned his Ph.D. from the University of Texas and his BA from the University of California, Irvine. He has been blogging since 2003 (originally at the now defunct Poliblog). Follow Steven on Twitter

Comments

  1. de stijl says:

    Yesterday I watched a NOVA show about dogs and humans: our co-evolution. Dogs in their transition to their current status as companions had a genetic variation that stuck that upped their oxytocin production. If I recall correctly it was adrenal gland size and susceptaptability to be engaged. I may have understood that wrong. Please check my science.

    I am firmly convinced that dogs changed us as much as we changed them. I lost my buddy several years ago. I miss him. We had adventures. We hung out. We played.

    There was a segment about a 60 year long experiment in Russia about domestication of silver foxes which amazed me. They identified foxes which were amenable to human interaction and interbred them for dozens of generations. The results were astounding. I won’t spoil – you have to watch.

    I have no buddy now, but that show made me cry at least ten times. Django was a mutt and nigh untrainable. But his whole hindquarters waggled when he as happy and was truly wagging hard.

    Dogs domesticated us as much as we domesticated them.

    Check it out if you want. “Dog Tales” was the title. Dog Tales on NOVA wherever you can stream PBS shows. You will happy cry, which is the best form.

    Next week is Cat Tales, btw.

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  2. de stijl says:

    I identify with dude above.

    Likes the concept of attention seeking behavior and is bold enough to give it a go, but is uncomfortable with actual attention and therefore withdraws.

    I know that Orang dude. Hard.

    ReplyReply
  3. Scott says:

    @de stijl:

    They identified foxes which were amenable to human interaction and interbred them for dozens of generations. The results were astounding. I won’t spoil – you have to watch.

    If I remember right, the foxes started changing to softer features (like larget eyes and rounder snouts) in as little as 6 generations.

    ReplyReply
  4. gVOR08 says:

    Something like a quarter of wolf cubs will fetch a ball.

    I imagine everyone’s heard the Rudyard Kipling story about the early man sitting alone by his fire. A cow came by and said, “Man, if you’ll let me graze here and shelter me from the rain I’ll give you sweet milk to drink.” Later a horse came by and said, “Man, if you’ll let me graze here and comb my coat I’ll carry you where you want to go.” A dog came by and said, “Man, if you’ll feed me I’ll guard you while you sleep.” Bit later a cat came by, looked at the man, looked at the fire and the dog and horse and cow, and said, “Man, I like your looks, I’ll stay awhile.”

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