ANOTHER MYTH SHATTERED

William Saletan and Ben Jacobs debunk Carol Mosely-Braun’s only significant accomplishment as a Senator, the denial of Congressional recognition for the United Daughters of the Confederacy’s symbol featuring the Stars and Bars:

Braun did awaken the otherwise all-white Senate to the potential offensiveness of the insignia. But the awakening entailed no parliamentary brilliance, no “lone valiant stand,” no going “to the mat,” and no “swaying.” The renewal of the insignia patent was attached as a minor amendment by Sen. Jesse Helms, R-N.C., to a national service bill. The amendment passed largely because senators weren’t paying close attention to what they were voting on. In the words of Sen. Bob Bennett, R-Utah, “I walked on the floor today, without having the slightest idea what the issue was, I was told, as were many Republican senators, this is a Republican amendment. . . .I quickly realized, after the motion to table had failed, that a large number of Republicans did not realize the greater implications of what had just happened.” Once Braun got them to focus on the content of the amendment, they switched.

What exactly did Braun accomplish? The insignia was never changed. It no longer has the special honor of a congressional design patent, but it’s hard to see what effect, if any, this has had on black or white Americans.

FILED UNDER: US Politics
James Joyner
About James Joyner
James Joyner is Professor and Department Head of Security Studies at Marine Corps University's Command and Staff College and a nonresident senior fellow at the Scowcroft Center for Strategy and Security at the Atlantic Council. He's a former Army officer and Desert Storm vet. Views expressed here are his own. Follow James on Twitter @DrJJoyner.

Comments

  1. John says:

    Why is everyone kicking her lately? I mean, she’s not really going to win or anything. . . Just seems a little odd.

  2. Kathy K says:

    I dunno, she took on Helms and won. That should count for something.
    The left isn’t always wrong.

  3. Leroy says:

    Heck, most everyone took on Jesse and won in the Senate. He wasn’t called Senator No because he was always voting for something to pass. In fact, if I recall correctly, there were a lot of 99-1 votes with Jesse on the losing end. 🙂