George McGovern In Hospice

Former Senator and Presidential candidate George McGovern has entered hospice care, typically a sign that the end of life is near:

Longtime former U.S. Sen. George McGovern, the Democratic presidential candidate who lost to President Richard Nixon in a historic landslide, has moved into hospice care near his home in South Dakota, his family said Monday.

“He’s coming to the end of his life,” his daughter, Ann McGovern, told The Associated Press. She declined to elaborate but noted that her 90-year-old father has suffered several health problems in the last year.

George McGovern, who became a leader of the Democrats’ liberal wing during his three decades in Congress, lost his 1972 challenge to Nixon, who later resigned amid the Watergate scandal. McGovern has turned his focus in recent years to world hunger.

It was after a lecture tour last October that he was treated for exhaustion. Two months later, he fell and hit his head just before a scheduled interview with C-SPAN for a program focusing on failed presidential candidates who’ve had a lasting impact on American politics.

McGovern also spent several days in a Florida hospital in April for tests to determine why he occasionally passed out and had difficulty speaking.

His daughter said he has moved in the Dougherty Hospice House in Sioux Falls, where he moved in August to spend more time near his family. He had been splitting his time between homes in Mitchell, S.D., and Florida.

I was far too young to really remember the 1972 race, but for some time thereafter McGovern became something of a fixture as a political commentator. Whatever his health issues are, one hopes things go for the best.

FILED UNDER: Quick Takes, US Politics
Doug Mataconis
About Doug Mataconis
Doug holds a B.A. in Political Science from Rutgers University and J.D. from George Mason University School of Law. He joined the staff of OTB in May 2010. Before joining OTB, he wrote at Below The BeltwayThe Liberty Papers, and United Liberty Follow Doug on Twitter | Facebook

Comments

  1. OzarkHillbilly says:

    Whatever his health issues are, one hopes things go for the best.

    Quick, quiet, and peaceful. He earned that.

    “He volunteered for the U.S. Army Air Forces upon the country’s entry into World War II and as a B-24 Liberator pilot flew 35 missions over German-occupied Europe. Among the medals awarded him was a Distinguished Flying Cross for making a hazardous emergency landing of his damaged plane and saving his crew.”

  2. DC Loser says:

    The standard tour for the Air Corp bomber crews was 25 missions. They figured that most of them would be dead or captured before they got to the 25 mission mark, so anyone who made it that far was already way ahead of the odds. That he apparently volunteered for another tour speaks volumes about his sense of duty.

    Sen. McGovern was a true patriot who didn’t brag about his service. He did what he truly believed were the right things to do as a politician and as an American. He will be truly missed.

  3. DC Loser says:

    I’m wrong about the 25 mission tour. Apparently was the 8th Air Force policy. The 15th AF, where McGovern flew for, had a 35 mission policy.

  4. Scott says:

    The last of the prairie socialists. I wonder if the folks in the northern Great Plains remember their heritage.

  5. sam says:

    @OzarkHillbilly:

    “He volunteered for the U.S. Army Air Forces upon the country’s entry into World War II and as a B-24 Liberator pilot flew 35 missions over German-occupied Europe.

    He participated in the low-level raid on Ploesti. I think of Randall Jarrell’s
    poem:

    The Death of the Ball Turret Gunner

    From my mother’s sleep I fell into the State,
    And I hunched in its belly till my wet fur froze.
    Six miles from earth, loosed from its dream of life,
    I woke to black flak and the nightmare fighters.
    When I died they washed me out of the turret with a hose.