Welcome to Wisconsin (A Division of Koch Industries)

A Welcome to Wisconsin sign with another sign saying "A Division of Koch Industries" is going around Twitter.

This photo of a Welcome to Wisconsin sign with another sign saying “A Division of Koch Industries” is going around Twitter:

I haven’t been able to ascertain whether it’s a real sign or clever PhotoShopping but it’s mildly amusing. The notion that Koch money was a significant factor in the recent labor fight strikes me as silly, but it’s widely held in certain circles.

via Joshua Foust and Steve Hynd

FILED UNDER: Humor, Quick Takes,
James Joyner
About James Joyner
James Joyner is Professor and Department Head of Security Studies at Marine Corps University's Command and Staff College and a nonresident senior fellow at the Scowcroft Center for Strategy and Security at the Atlantic Council. He's a former Army officer and Desert Storm vet. Views expressed here are his own. Follow James on Twitter @DrJJoyner.

Comments

  1. reid says:

    It’s a humorous bumper-sticker slogan symbolic of a bigger struggle, of course. Can you really argue that the Kochs and other wealthy rightwing partisans haven’t had a big effect on the political landscape? And that they didn’t play a big part in getting Walker (and lots of others, particularly tea party types) elected?

  2. sam says:

    Might come to be accurate given the no-bid infrastructure giveaways Patron Walker and his confederates in the government have arranged.

  3. Jay Tea says:

    Of course, that overlooks that the unions paid a HELL of a lot more for Wisconsin. That’s why they’re so upset — they thought they bought the state, fair and square, but it was just a lease — and the true owners decided to not renew the lease last November.

    In the foreclosure biz, banks have begun paying people to NOT trash the home before they are evicted — it’s called “cash for keys.” Apparently in Wisconsin, they haven’t figured out that one, and the unions are wrecking the place.

    J.

  4. tom p says:

    J. They earned whatever they got. Now Scott walker wants them dropped to the slave wages everybody else got rather than bringing everyone else up to their wages

  5. G.A.Phillips says:

    J. They earned whatever they got. Now Scott walker wants them dropped to the slave wages everybody else got rather than bringing everyone else up to their wages

    lol……..Slave wages he says….

  6. Stan says:

    The median annual salary for high school teachers in the US is $43,000. The median annual starting salary for a teacher in the small (but prosperous) town in Wisconsin where I went to public school is $32,000. For somebody with a BS degree plus the additional training required for certification (see http://dpi.wi.gov/tepdl/licguide.html), this is not a hell of a lot of money. Jay Tea, would you work this kind of money?

  7. anjin-san says:

    > Jay Tea, would you work this kind of money?

    Based on what we have seen of Jay, he probably thinks 43K a year is rolling in clover…

  8. John Burgess says:

    Well, considering that the ED major is for those who can’t even hack it in PE, $43K is probably overpaying.

  9. Tlaloc says:

    “Well, considering that the ED major is for those who can’t even hack it in PE, $43K is probably overpaying.”

    There are certain, let’s say reversals that astound me. Not so much that they happen but that they happen with such audacity and speed and yet the people take no notice. A prime example would be torture where we went int he course of a decade from a country that openly declared torture to be immoral and unacceptable to one where one major party *championed* torture to one where both parties champion torture and are unashamed to say so. In fact it’d be viewed as “soft on terrorism” at this point for a politician to say simply “no I wouldn’t order the torture of known Al-Qaeda much less the random goat herds we grab in afghanistan.”

    That kind of cognitive dissonance just astounds me. I mention it because here we have another case. Republicans, despite all the “american exceptionalism, mom, apple pie, and lockheed martin” talk have managed to turn themselves into people who *hate* teachers. It’s startling and sad really to see such an under-appreciated and vital group become vilified by a major party. I know the modern GOP thrives on vilifying the “other” and that’s nauseating and frankly just evil, but the fact that they managed to so logically contort themselves that teachers are one of their many “others” is really amazing.

    It does not speak well of either their character or their rationality.

  10. Tlaloc says:

    As a side note I think of course that the demonization of teachers is part and parcel of the attack on all intellectualism and empirical knowledge. That also speaks poorly of their character.

  11. blumuze says:

    Jay Tea said, “Of course, that overlooks that the unions paid a HELL of a lot more for Wisconsin.”

    Of course, your statement overlooks the fact that the unions, unlike the Koch brothers, might be representing someone other than themselves.