George Zimmerman Granted $1 Million Bond

After weeks where he sat in jail after his bond was revoked for not disclosing assets in his original bond hearing, Trayvon Marton shooting suspect George Zimmerman will likely be free pending trial once again: 

SANFORD, Florida (Reuters) – A Florida judge set bond at $1 million on Thursday for George Zimmerman, the Florida neighborhood watch volunteer who shot and killed unarmed black teenager Trayvon Martin.

Zimmerman had been released after posting $150,000 bond but was sent back to jail in April after prosecutors alleged he misled the court about his finances.

Circuit Judge Kennedy Lester said the higher bond amount was necessary to ensure Zimmerman would show up for trial on second-degree murder charges.

“The increased bail is not a punishment; It is meant to allay this court’s concern that the defendant intended to flee the jurisdiction and a lesser amount would not ensure his presence in court,” Lester wrote in his eight-page order.

The judge imposed numerous restrictions. He said that if released from jail again, Zimmerman must submit to electronic monitoring, remain in Seminole County, stay away from the Orlando-Sanford International Airport, refrain from applying for a passport or opening or maintaining a bank account, avoid alcohol and obey a curfew from 6 p.m. to 6 a.m.

Zimmerman is charged in the February 26 shooting death of 17-year-old Martin in a gated community in the central Florida city of Sanford.

Zimmerman’s lawyer said that his client’s defense fund has close to $210,000 in it, which means it should be relatively easy for him to post the 10% down that most bonding companies require in a relatively short amount of time.

FILED UNDER: Crime, Law and the Courts, Quick Takes
Doug Mataconis
About Doug Mataconis
Doug holds a B.A. in Political Science from Rutgers University and J.D. from George Mason University School of Law. He joined the staff of OTB in May 2010. Before joining OTB, he wrote at Below The BeltwayThe Liberty Papers, and United Liberty Follow Doug on Twitter | Facebook

Comments

  1. anjin-san says:

    I wonder if Jenos has sent a check to his hero to help out…

  2. bandit says:

    Another setback for the lunatic lefty lynchmob

  3. Herb says:

    @bandit: Yeah, dude, cuz nothing says “lynch mob” like giving the guy a fair trial…..

  4. Moderate Mom says:

    How can the judge tell someone they can’t maintain a bank account? How the heck is one supposed to pay bills without one? Cash checks at the liquor store and then go to the local 7-11 to buy money orders?

  5. JohnMcC says:

    He apparently had two passports as well as almost a quarter million dollars in undisclosed cash. He’s lucky to be offered bail at any price.

  6. Jed says:

    @Herb: Dunno, Herb. As it has reached this point, a fair trial would be a lovely thing indeed, and yet …

    Due to certain actions by certain high-profile people, an untainted jury pool might be difficult to assemble. I also have some reservations concerning Prosecutor Corey’s conduct. There is a pattern of behavior (past and present) that might indicate, at least to some, a lack of discretion. In either sense of the word. This isn’t really even on my back burner (more like the Salton heating tray you use to keep the Brie warm) but Jerralynn Merritt at TalkLeft has been following this fairly closely and presents a somewhat compelling argument for this being a pretty dodgy case.

    Then again, she’s a defense lawyer. One could be forgiven for believing that she has fallen victim to the principle of expectancy. Happens. Even to the best.

    Lordy, though, I wish I were assigned to this case. Everything across my desk these days is dead boring.

  7. 11B40 says:

    Greetings:

    “The increased bail is not a punishment.” the judge wrote. I’m guessing that it’s okay, legal-wise, for the judge to lie to himself.

    So, let me see if I understand this bail thing. It’s supposed to protect the community and ensure that the accused shows up for trial. So, first I have to tell the judge how much money I have access to because the judge needs this information to what, cripple me and mine economically? Because, sometimes and somewheres, access to economic resources has be proven to correlate 1000% with abscondment? Meanwhile, I read somewhere that Mr. Zimmerman’s parole officer testified that he was a model client or is that customer? I guess the officer missed the memo.

    Scooter Libby 2.0, it is. These progressive politicians just love making this stuff up. If there was any truth at all in the judge’s above writing, it was that it’s the process that’s the punishment. Mr. Zimmerman violated the progressive truth on so many levels that all lies and deceits in connection with his tribulations are as dust in the wind. And meanwhile, one Eric (and Eric is an honorable man) Holder, late of Mark Rich fame, waits in the US DoJ wings for his bite at Mr. Zimmerman’s apples.

  8. al-Ameda says:

    @JohnMcC:

    He apparently had two passports as well as almost a quarter million dollars in undisclosed cash. He’s lucky to be offered bail at any price.

    My thoughts exactly.

  9. al-Ameda says:

    @11B40:

    “The increased bail is not a punishment.” the judge wrote. I’m guessing that it’s okay, legal-wise, for the judge to lie to himself.”

    I’m thinking that if Zimmerman did not misrepresent himself to the court on recent occasion, that he would not be subject to the new bail restrictions.

  10. DRS says:

    Yup, Zimmerman’s only crime was “violating the progressive truth”, whatever that is. The fact that he shot and killed someone is totally irrelevant – maybe even imaginary. Probably never happened at all.

  11. al-Ameda says:

    @11B40:

    These progressive politicians just love making this stuff up. If there was any truth at all in the judge’s above writing, it was that it’s the process that’s the punishment. Mr. Zimmerman violated the progressive truth on so many levels that all lies and deceits in connection with his tribulations are as dust in the wind.

    Exactly what does any of that “progressive truth” excrement have to do with the judge setting new restrictive bail requirements because Zimmerman misrepresented (“progressive lying”?) himself to the court?

  12. archon41 says:

    There’s a little more to it than this. O’Mara is saying the Zimmerman family will have to come up with 1 mil in collateral to persuade a bondsman to post a bond in this amount, and they don’t have it. Doesn’t help to have the judge proclaiming that Zimmerman is a flight risk. They will need an additional $85,000 for the fee. The fund collected for legal and living expenses contains about $211,000, exclusive of $40,000 in accrued costs and expenses. What Lester has done, in effect, is to impose a judicial penalty of 50% on these donations. In his order, he does not deign to offer any justification for “shafting” the donors in this way.

    The claim that the Zimmermans were contemplating fleeing abroad and setting up a new life with the vast sum of $130,000 is frivolous. The real reason Zimmerman did not disclose the amount in this fund to the court is because he feared the judge would require him to deplete it for bail, leaving him facing a political and racial vendetta without adequate resources to defend himself. O’Mara may be working pro bono, but there are limits to the time and expense he can be expected to put into the case. He says today the scope of the defense will be a function of available funds.

    The prosecution made clear on Friday that “coudda done this” and “coudda done that” is not in this case. De la Rionda promised to prove a “pursuit,” and “chasing down.” There does not seem to be a shred of credible evidence to support this proposition. And unless John disappears, the prosecution would appear to be in deep trouble on the self-defense issue.

  13. anjin-san says:

    Zimmermann confronts a kid who is walking home from the store with some candy in his pocket, and ends up shooting him dead. He colludes with his wife to mislead the court, and his wife commits perjury. Apparently, on the far right, this makes one a hero.

  14. An Interested Party says:

    Apparently, on the far right, this makes one a hero.

    Or a victim…

  15. DRS says:

    @archon41:

    The claim that the Zimmermans were contemplating fleeing abroad and setting up a new life with the vast sum of $130,000 is frivolous. The real reason Zimmerman did not disclose the amount in this fund to the court is because he feared the judge would require him to deplete it for bail, leaving him facing a political and racial vendetta without adequate resources to defend himself.

    Aaaaahhhhh! The poor baby! It’s like the mean old judge just doesn’t understand the vewwy, vewwy great stress poor George is under – it’s so hard to monitor your website Paypal from jail where they make you wait in line for the WiFi connection and you’ve got to shower with all the lowlifes who would never, ever be allowed into the neighbourhood vigilante – er, I mean watch – program.

    I just love the pity party that is being thrown for George Zimmerman, who apparently doesn’t have to answer for his actions because he’s…he’s…something or other…that means he doesn’t have to, so there, that’s why, you big meanies. After all, people are…are…criticizing the dumbass police “investigation” which allowed a killer to just walk away. (Note to Zimmerman fans – he’s a killer; whether or not he’s a murderer is the point of the trial.)

    Guys who are in jail for really serious crimes like murder DO NOT lie to the court about anything. It kind of makes people suspect you’re not truthful about other things as well. Zimmerman’s lawyer must be picking splinters out of his forehead from all the head-bashing on the table he’s doing with this star client of his.

  16. Herb says:

    @archon41:

    “The real reason Zimmerman did not disclose the amount in this fund to the court is because he feared the judge would require him to deplete it for bail, leaving him facing a political and racial vendetta without adequate resources to defend himself.”

    And you think that’s a “good” reason? Sheesh…..

    And a political vendetta? Seriously? Zimmerman isn’t on trial because of some political vendetta. He’s on trial because he killed a kid under suspicious circumstances that must be worked out in an officially legally binding venue, aka a courtroom..

    @Jed:

    “Due to certain actions by certain high-profile people, an untainted jury pool might be difficult to assemble.”

    Yes, I agree, but I also get the sense that a lot of people think an “untainted jury pool” is one stocked with Zimmerman supporters who are reluctant to convict. To me, that’s the definition of taint.

    If jury concerns become paramount, a change of venue would be sufficient.

  17. Jenos Idanian #13 says:

    @anjin-san: I was going to ask if you’re stupid, delusional, or just a truly obsessive liar, but then I realized that 1) it could be any combo, and 2) I don’t care.

    There is at least as much if not more evidence indicating that Martin initiated the confrontation, not Zimmerman — who had given up following Martin.

    Aside from the gunshot wound, Martin’s sole injury were some skinned knuckles. Zimmerman had a broken nose and a bashed-up head.

    You keep “forgetting” those key points, which — coincidentally, I’m sure — seriously threaten your “evil white Hispanic racist stalks and murders angelic child” narrative. Are you auditioning for a job at NBC or something?

  18. Jenos Idanian #13 says:

    @Herb: Yes, God forbid Zimmerman face a jury who thinks he might be innocent until the state proves he’s guilty beyond a reasonable doubt. That would just be… awful.

  19. Monala says:

    @Jenos Idanian #13: No witnesses saw the fight start. The only evidence that Martin initiated the confrontation and that Zimmerman had stopped his pursuit is Zimmerman’s word. And his word hasn’t been very trustworthy of late.

    Martin’s only injury was a 1/4″ abrasion on on knuckle. Not exactly evidence of him administering a beating to Zimmerman. And the full doctor’s report indicates that Zimmerman had only minor abrasions on his head, but no head trauma. So his story about having his head bashed repeatedly into the sidewalk is bull as well.

  20. archon41 says:

    I long ago resigned myself to the utter futility of attempting to reason with those who have extracted from this event a narrative confirming their moral and intellectual superiority. Facts and logic cannot overcome highly gratifying self-images. We are witnessing an exhibition of collective masterbation.

  21. Herb says:

    @Jenos Idanian #13:

    “There is at least as much if not more evidence indicating that Martin initiated the confrontation, not Zimmerman — who had given up following Martin.”

    Sorry, Jenos, but Zimmerman’s broken nose and bloody head are NOT evidence that Martin initiated the confrontation. They’re evidence that a confrontation took place, but from that you cannot tell who threw the first punch.

  22. Jenos Idanian #13 says:

    @Herb: There’s also the 911 call, which strongly indicates that Zimmerman stopped the pursuit. There’s also the time lapse between the call and the confrontation, which indicates that Martin turned around and confronted Zimmerman.

    The medical reports show Zimmerman with several abrasions to his head and a broken nose — entirely consistent with his story that Martin threw the first punch, knocked him flat, and started bashing his head into the ground. The injury to Martin’s hand also supports that.

    As far as anjin’s fantasy that ZImmerman hunted down, confronted, and shot Martin… that’s supported by his prejudices and stereotypes and profiling. Nothing more.

    And Herb, one correction: the injuries of the two parties IS evidence that Zimmerman’s account is accurate. What is isn’t is PROOF. anjin’s fantasy lacks even that.

  23. Jenos Idanian #13 says:

    @Herb: More to the point: there’s evidence that Martin threw a punch, and none that Zimmerman threw one. If Martin did all the punching, then he by definition threw the first one.

  24. Monala says:

    @Jenos Idanian #13: The 911 call could go either way. Zimmerman said, “OK,” to the statement, “We don’t need you to do that [follow him],” but he also changed his mind about meeting the police at the mailboxes, and asked for the police to call when they arrived, “and I’ll tell them where I’m at.” That suggests that Zimmerman planned on moving, not staying put. And indeed, he did keep moving, as his own testimony in his video re-enactment shows. He said it was to look for an address, but the police investigator said to him that it sounded more like he was still looking for Martin.

    The time lapse also could go either way. Just as Martin could have gotten home during that time, Zimmerman could have arrived back at his car. Yet neither did.

    And again, Zimmerman’s own doctor’s report said that his head wound doesn’t indicate his head was bashed. And the broken nose indicates Martin threw a punch (probably his only punch, given the single 1/4″ abrasion on his hand). It still doesn’t tell us who initiated physical contact.

  25. Monala says:

    @Jenos Idanian #13: There are other ways to initiate physical contact besides throwing a punch. If Zimmerman cornered or grabbed Martin, Martin may have felt that taking a swing was his only defense.

    That can’t be proven, since again, no one saw the beginning of the fight. But Zimmerman has clearly lied multiple times (his own doctor said his head wasn’t bashed; he and his wife lied about the passport and the money at their disposal; he lied at his first bail hearing about thinking Trayvon was about his own age, when he said in his 911 call that Trayvon was a teenager). So tell me why we should trust him when he says Martin started it?

  26. DRS says:

    Of course Zimmerman was following Martin. That’s what sheriffs do, after all. Then he’d be there when the police arrived and he’d be the Big Hero, who stalked the Dangerous Intruder through the dark, deserted streets of a suburban gated townhouse complex and Held Him at Bay with the Steely Force of his Stern Glare. Then he’d tip his stetson to the officials, mount his Trusty Steed and ride off into the rainy night to right more wrongs, pursue more crime and just maybe recharge his cellphone battery.

    I’ll bet you anything he had a theme song playing in his head the whole time. Something techno, hard-pulsing bass beats and moody sythesizers, to reflect the mission of the neighborhood sheriff just doin’ his job, ma’am.

  27. 11B40 says:

    Greetings:

    Another bit of tid that strikes me in this legal soap opera of Mr. Zimmerman’s bail is this: Mr. Zimmerman lied to the judge, so the judge is the or one of the victims of the aforementioned Mr. Zimmerman’s perfidy. So, then the judge/victim gets to act as finder of fact, and then as decider of the judicial non-punishment. Interesting.

    And then, in that wonderful “sky is falling” tradition, the same judge, using, no doubt, his judicial temperment, decides that his abscond-ophobia out weighs the facts of Mr. Zimmerman’s behavior (while previously out on an obviously misguided bail) and which has be attested to by the relevant public official. Interesting.

    We are living in interesting times, as the Chinese might intuit.

  28. Jenos Idanian #13 says:

    @Monala: Here’s where you have to apply a little deductive reasoning. The operator asked Zimmerman if he was following Martin because she heard he was a little out of breath. After she said “we don’t need you to do that,” Zimmerman acknowledged that and his breathing returned to normal.

    The logical assumption here: he was walking quickly to keep up with Martin, then slowed or stopped. Proven? No. But a reasonable assumption.

    @Monala: Then how did the back of Zimmerman’s head get so bloody? Did he immediately realize “I better come up with a good story” and start smacking his own head against the ground?

    Or did he resist Martin’s head-bashing, reducing the impact against the pavement? If I was in his reported position (flat on my back, assailant atop me, trying to bash my head against the ground), I’d be using every bit of my strength to keep my head up and off the ground.

    No, it’s not a conclusive theory. But it has evidence to support it. Unlike anjin’s fantasy, where he just pretends certain inconvenient truths. Or DRS’ profiling and stereotyping, which seems based on his own prejudices — that anyone who kills a black person is an evil, predatory racist murderer until proven otherwise. And, apparently, the burden of proof is impossibly high.

  29. Jenos Idanian #13 says:

    @11B40: I just wanted so say that I loved this phrase:

    Another bit of tid

    I just might have to steal it.

  30. DRS says:

    Jenos – you apologize immediately!

    Not once have I ever cited Zimmerman as a racist. Look back through every thread – you will not find me saying any such thing. Either back your statement that I did up with proof, or take it back.

    What I have said consistently is that Zimmerman is a nosy-parker, an officious neighborhood busybody who finally stepped on a landmine and had it blow up in his stupid face. He is a typical super-hero-wanna-be, a fool with a gun, playing out cops-and-robbers scenarios in his mind. And now he’s in deeper trouble than he expected to be.

    Zimmerman shot Martin – he’s never claimed otherwise. Whether he’s racist or not – I don’t know or care – he’s just the kind of loser who shouldn’t be allowed to carry a gun without an adult present to make sure he doesn’t do something stupid like that again. And he can quit lying for convenience sake about his funds and his passports, too. It makes people suspicious.

    Although his idea of a jail break might be digging out of the cell through a tunnel just like in The Great Escape where Steve McQueen rode that great motorcycle.

    I await an apology.

  31. Jenos Idanian #13 says:

    @DRS: I’d apologize, DRS, but under the new rules, once accused of racism, you’re a racist until you thoroughly prove otherwise. Sucks, but that’s how it is.

    Your stereotype/profiling of Zimmerman is woefully shallow. Up until this incident, he seemed like the kind of guy you WANT in your neighborhood. Looks out for his neighbors, stands up for right (when a cop’s son beat up a homeless black man, Zimmerman was one of the leaders of the movement to get the whole story out — even canvassing black churches to rally support), wants to be a cop to protect his community, etc. etc.

    Go back to watching “Paul Blart.”

  32. DRS says:

    Jenos – you lied about me. Apologize immediately.

  33. mantis says:

    @Jenos Idanian #13:

    Here’s where you have to apply a little deductive reasoning.

    Is that what you call starting from the conclusion and working backwards?

    The operator asked Zimmerman if he was following Martin because she heard he was a little out of breath.

    How do you know she asked that because he was out of breath? You just invented that reason. It’s clear from the call that she asks him that because he is describing Martin’s every move, even as he describes Martin clearly trying to get away from him.

    After she said “we don’t need you to do that,” Zimmerman acknowledged that and his breathing returned to normal.

    The logical assumption here: he was walking quickly to keep up with Martin, then slowed or stopped. Proven? No. But a reasonable assumption.

    Zimmerman tells the dispatcher that he no longer knows where “the kid” is, so it seems from the call that he did stop following him at that moment. But the call ends shortly after and we can’t draw any conclusions about Zimmerman’s next action based on it. He very well may have resumed his search agains the dispatcher’s instructions.

    Then how did the back of Zimmerman’s head get so bloody?

    Minor head wounds often bleed a lot.

    Did he immediately realize “I better come up with a good story” and start smacking his own head against the ground?

    Or did he resist Martin’s head-bashing, reducing the impact against the pavement? If I was in his reported position (flat on my back, assailant atop me, trying to bash my head against the ground), I’d be using every bit of my strength to keep my head up and off the ground.

    Or he just had minor cuts consistent with the report from the doctor who examined him. But the doctor is probably in on the conspiracy, isn’t he Jenos?

    No, it’s not a conclusive theory. But it has evidence to support it.

    No, it really doesn’t.

    Unlike anjin’s fantasy, where he just pretends certain inconvenient truths.

    Pot, meet kettle. It’s been clear since the beginning of all of this that you decided how things went down, and since then you’ve ignored all evidence to the contrary while inventing plenty to support your pre-conceived conclusion.

    Also, how does one “pretend a truth,” exactly?

  34. mantis says:

    @DRS:

    Jenos – you lied about me. Apologize immediately.

    Don’t hold your breath. He lies in pretty much every comment he writes.

  35. anjin-san says:

    There is at least as much if not more evidence indicating that Martin initiated the confrontation, not Zimmerman — who had given up following Martin.

    Well, we have:

    A. A kid walking home from buying candy at the store, going about his lawful business
    B. A grown man driving around with a gun, utterly against neighborhood watch protocol

    Who do I blame for the confrontation? I blame B.

  36. anjin-san says:

    Up until this incident, he seemed like the kind of guy you WANT in your neighborhood.

    Yea, I want a guy who has a history that includes a restraining order by a former girlfriend and mandatory anger management classes driving around my neighborhood with a gun eyeballing my 13 year old nephew, who is a nice shade a brown and fond of hoodies. I surely do.

  37. anjin-san says:

    your “evil white Hispanic racist stalks and murders angelic child” narrative.

    Since you obsessively search through past posts, perhaps you can show where I called Zimmermann evil, referred to his race, or said Martin was an angel.

    Or you could fail to do so, which will simple be further proof that you are full of shit. Seriously dude, get a life.

  38. mantis says:

    @anjin-san:

    Since you obsessively search through past posts, perhaps you can show where I called Zimmermann evil, referred to his race, or said Martin was an angel.

    You don’t get to make your own arguments, buddy. Jenos will assign them to you as he sees fit.

  39. Jenos Idanian #13 says:

    @anjin-san: I realize this might be a foreign concept to you, but look at it from a legal standpoint. At any point did Zimmerman break any laws? Following someone is NOT illegal. Nor is it legal justification for assault.

    Zimmerman’s story is he (legally) followed Martin while calling 911 (remember “if you see something, say something?”) and LEGALLY carrying a properly licensed gun. And his story — which has YET to be challenged successfully — is that he lost Martin, then Martin approached him, spoke to him aggressively, then threw the first punch.

    So, in your world, is thinking I’m being “dissed” justification for me to assault someone, or does that only apply to certain races and/or ages? Is there a form of “affirmative action” in relation to the law here?

  40. Jenos Idanian #13 says:

    @DRS: In retrospect, I should not have said “racist,” but “RAAAAACIST,” with the all-caps and extra vowels to emphasize that it’s a ridiculous charge. For that, I apologize.

    However, you are heavily profiling and stereotyping Zimmerman based on… exceptionally flimsy evidence, and that does strongly indicate a level of prejudice in the literal sense — that you’re pre-judging Zimmerman.

  41. Jenos Idanian #13 says:

    @mantis: I haven’t come down solidly on any single scenario so far, and don’t intend to do so any time soon.

    But the trend so far has been for the “Zimmerman is guilty” side to constantly have to revise and correct and withdraw and restate its statements as more and more evidence comes out, while Zimmerman’s story from the outset has held together remarkably well.

    The race may not always go to the swift, nor the battle to the strong, but that’s the way to bet.

    Hell, mantis, one of our hosts actually declared that Zimmerman was chasing Martin with his gun drawn based solely on said host’s inability to imagine it happening any other way. And I don’t recall you saying “boo” about that one.

  42. mantis says:

    @Jenos Idanian #13:

    And his story — which has YET to be challenged successfully

    Can we have a trial, or do you want to go ahead and declare him not guilty on the basis that a trial hasn’t occurred yet?

  43. Herb says:

    @Jenos Idanian #13: Better to be thought a fool than to type your comments and remove all doubt…….

    Here you are worrying about the “first punch” which resulted in a broken nose. Are you concerned about the “last shot” that resulted in a young man’s death? Nope….

    And here you are talking about Zimmerman’s legal gun ownership. As if this is the first legal gun owner facing a murder trial….

    And while I admire your devotion and loyalty to the prevailing winds of the American right wing, it’s simply sad that you must twist yourself into knots of stupid to do so.

  44. mantis says:

    I haven’t come down solidly on any single scenario so far, and don’t intend to do so any time soon.

    That’s funny. Tell another one.

    But the trend so far has been for the “Zimmerman is guilty” side to constantly have to revise and correct and withdraw and restate its statements as more and more evidence comes out

    Or maybe you just take everything you hear or half-hear and lump it all into one big mess and then assign those arguments to everyone you talk to who isn’t convinced Zimmerman is completely innocent.

    while Zimmerman’s story from the outset has held together remarkably well.

    If you say so.

    Hell, mantis, one of our hosts actually declared that Zimmerman was chasing Martin with his gun drawn based solely on said host’s inability to imagine it happening any other way. And I don’t recall you saying “boo” about that one.

    I didn’t comment on that post at all, and I’m not sure I even read it when it went up. So what? Having read it now, it certainly seems that James has jumped to a conclusion not in evidence (though not unreasonable). Again, so what? Why does it matter that I didn’t comment on James’s post?

  45. anjin-san says:

    Zimmerman’s story

    Yes, well Zimmermann is the guy who is sitting in jail because he tried to mislead the court. So we know how credible his word is, don’t we?

    And once again:

    Since you obsessively search through past posts, perhaps you can show where I called Zimmermann evil, referred to his race, or said Martin was an angel.

  46. anjin-san says:

    So, in your world, is thinking I’m being “dissed” justification for me to assault someone,

    Ah. And since Martin was black, obviously the who thing is about him reacting to a perceived slight “being dissed” with violence. Not being freaked about being followed by a strange man when he was walking home from the store. Oh yes, and “affirmative action”, has something to do with it.

    In the end with you, it really does come down to Martin being black.

    Jesus, you really are an utter imbecile.

    But now its coming back to me, Wenos… prattle of the dead… total waste of time…

  47. anjin-san says:

    Hmm. Typo imitates life 🙂

  48. An Interested Party says:

    Don’t hold your breath. He lies in pretty much every comment he writes.

    Well, considering that Jenos is probably the commenter formerly known as Jay Tea, what do you expect…

  49. Jenos Idanian #13 says:

    Hey, let’s do something radical and unheard-of: let’s drag this discussion, kicking and screaming, back on topic.

    I’m starting to question whether or not Zimmerman should even be put on trial. At least, on the charge of 2nd degree murder.

    Normally I’m suspicious of attorneys in general and defense attorneys in particular. And I’m even more skeptical of defense lawyers talking about defendants — even if they’re not their own clients. But Jeralyn Merritt and Alan Dershowitz have taken very close looks at the arrest warrant and indictment of Zimmerman and say that they’re extremely, extremely weak.

    Yeah, Zimmerman hid the fund from the courts. He was caught and hauled in to answer for it. But it strikes me as understandable. Zimmerman instantly found himself one of the most hated men in America, with elements of the media actively lying about him and doing their level best to portray him as a monster. He had a paramilitary group with a history of violence putting a bounty on his head. He had celebrities posting his parents’ contact information on the internet.

    Yup, only a complete idiot and paranoid racist would feel threatened by that and do things to protect himself and his family.

    He made some poor choices when faced with a situation almost no one ever has to face, and has been punished for it.

    But the lessons for the rest of us are coming through loud and clear. If you see something suspicious, just STFU. Maybe call the cops, but once you’ve done that, don’t do anything else. Don’t look out for your neighbors. Don’t take responsibility for yourself and your community.

    And for Christ’s sake, if you end up lying on your back with someone bashing your head into the pavement, just lie there and take it. You probably had it coming.

  50. Rufus T. Firefly says:

    @Jenos Idanian #13:

    Tell me, do you listen to “Carmina Burana” while you write?

  51. Jenos Idanian #13 says:

    @Rufus T. Firefly: Used to, now it’s “Yakkety Sax.”

  52. Herb says:

    @Jenos Idanian #13:

    “But the lessons for the rest of us are coming through loud and clear. If you see something suspicious, just STFU. Maybe call the cops, but once you’ve done that, don’t do anything else. Don’t look out for your neighbors. Don’t take responsibility for yourself and your community. “

    If that’s the lesson you learned, you need to go back to school.

    Here’s what you should have learned:

    If you want to run a neighborhood watch program, don’t act like a negligent amateur. If you haven’t looked at this story and thought at least once, “Zimmerman could have handled this thing better,” then you really shouldn’t weigh in on this issue.

  53. Jenos Idanian #13 says:

    @Herb: In case you missed it, Herb, the question is not “Did Zimmerman handle things optimally.” Of course he didn’t.

    The question is, “did anything he did rise to the level of breaking the law, or in some way justify charging him with second-degree murder.”

    So far, the answer seems to be “no.”

  54. matt says:

    @Jenos Idanian #13: I agree second degree murder was excessive. Manslaughter of some kind would of surely been enough.

  55. mantis says:

    @Jenos Idanian #13:

    The question is, “did anything he did rise to the level of breaking the law, or in some way justify charging him with second-degree murder.”

    So far, the answer seems to be “no.”

    To you, because you see it from a political standpoint, and are willing to believe, without question, every detail of the story given by the killer himself, ignoring any evidence that contradicts his story and the possibility that there is further evidence of which you are unaware.

    In other words, you’re a lying hack whose only interest in this case is political. GFY.