Corey Stewart Caught Praising The Confederacy In 2017 Campaign Video

The Republican Party's nominee for Senator in Virginia really is as bad as you've heard, probably worse.

Virginia Republican Senate candidate Corey Stewart, who is already a controversial due to his courting of the alt-right, has been caught on a 2017 video of a speech he made while running for the Republican nomination for Governor praising the Confederacy and Virginia’s decision to secede from the Union, which of course led to the Civil War:

Corey Stewart, the Republican nominee for a US Senate seat for Virginia, praised in a speech last year Virginia’s decision in 1861 to secede from the Union, putting it on par with rebellions during the American Revolution and today.

The Virginia Republican made the comments in April 2017 at an event in South Boston, Virginia, hosted by an unapologetic secessionist. A video of his remarks, given during his failed 2017 gubernatorial run, was posted on his Facebook account.

He is challenging incumbent Democratic Sen. Tim Kaine, a strong favorite to keep his seat, and national Republicans are worried that Stewart’s candidacy will turn off some GOP voters, potentially hurting Republican’s ballot races.

“When you say you’re from Virginia, when you travel outside of this state and somebody asks where you’re from, you say with pride, ‘I am from Virginia. I’m very, very proud of it,'” Stewart said. “You’re very, very proud of it. And why is it? It’s because of our history, folks. It’s because of our history. This is the state of George Washington, Thomas Jefferson and James Madison and James Monroe. It’s a state of the founders. It’s the state of the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution.

“But it’s also the state of Robert E. Lee, and Stonewall Jackson, and J.E.B. Stuart. Because, at the base of it, Virginians, we think for ourselves,” he continued. “And if the established order is wrong, we rebel. We did that in the Revolution, we did it in the Civil War, and we’re doing it today. We’re doing it today because they’re trying to rob us of everything that we hold dear: our history, our heritage, our culture.”

Stewart, whose defense of Confederate symbols became a staple of his unsuccessful gubernatorial campaign, defined the established order earlier in the speech as the mainstream media, liberals, Democrats and establishment Republicans “trying to convince us that there’s something wrong with our heritage in Virginia.”

In response to a comment request from CNN, Stewart released the following statement: “Unlike Wimpy Tim Kaine, Virginians have a warrior spirit and a rebel heart.”

Stewart has continually tried to downplay his past ties and praise of white nationalist figures like Jason Kessler, an organizer of the Unite the Right rally in Charlottesville, and Paul Nehlen, the anti-Semitic Republican congressional candidate who took on Paul Ryan in 2016.

According to records from Virginia’s Department of Elections, the event in which he praised secession was paid for by avowed secessionist George Randall. Stewart was introduced by Randall’s wife, Donna, who also promoted the event on Facebook.

Here’s the Facebook video:

CNN also reports that Randall and his wife also attended the alt-right “Unite The Right” rally that took place in Charlottesville just under a year ago that included tiki-torch carrying protesters shouting Nuremberg rally type slogans and, of course, the death of a young woman at the hands of a white supremacist. At that rally, Mr. Randall was seen marching alongside former Ku Klux Klan leader David Duke.

Stewart’s rhetoric here is not at all surprising, of course.

As I noted earlier this week, he built his ill-fated campaign for the Republican Gubernatorial nomination last year and his successful bid for the party’s Senate nomination this year on openly appealing to the alt-right, to white supremacists, and to people who have what can only be described as an odd fetish for the Confederacy. Additionally, Stewart gave this speech in South Boston, Virginia, a town located in Halifax County in far south Central Virginia within mere miles of the border with North Carolina. This is a part of the Commonwealth that is probably the most “southern” part of the state and one in which it is not at all uncommon to see Confederate flags flying in front of buildings and private homes, among other things. With the possible exception of the extreme southwestern part of the state that borders North Carolina, Kentucky, and Tennessee, it is one of the areas where a message like Stewart’s is likely to resonate the strongest. Unfortunately for Stewart, it’s also one of the least populated areas of the state.

As for Stewart’s rhetoric about the Civil War and secession, it is, of course, entirely historically inaccurate. Secession and the war were not about rebelling against an oppressive government in the same sense that the American Revolution was rebelling against the oppressive and unrepresentative government of Great Britain. The secession of South Carolina and the states of the Deep South was not prompted by any overt act by the United States, but by the fact that Abraham Lincoln, who wasn’t even necessarily an abolitionist himself, was elected President. The fact that Lincoln could not have done much of anything to threaten slavery in the South thanks to the fact that Congress, and especially the Senate, was firmly in the control of Southern politicians, was seemingly not sufficient succor to the group of elitists and pro-slavery radicals who pushed the secession movement. What did push the movement, though, was slavery and racism. One need only read the Secession Resolutions themselves, or the words of the man who became the Vice-President of the Confederacy, Alexander Stephens: (emphasis mine)

Our new government is founded upon exactly the opposite idea; its foundations are laid, its corner- stone rests, upon the great truth that the negro is not equal to the white man; that slavery subordination to the superior race is his natural and normal condition. This, our new government, is the first, in the history of the world, based upon this great physical, philosophical, and moral truth. This truth has been slow in the process of its development, like all other truths in the various departments of science. It has been so even amongst us. Many who hear me, perhaps, can recollect well, that this truth was not generally admitted, even within their day. The errors of the past generation still clung to many as late as twenty years ago. Those at the North, who still cling to these errors, with a zeal above knowledge, we justly denominate fanatics. All fanaticism springs from an aberration of the mind from a defect in reasoning. It is a species of insanity. One of the most striking characteristics of insanity, in many instances, is forming correct conclusions from fancied or erroneous premises; so with the anti-slavery fanatics. Their conclusions are right if their premises were. They assume that the negro is equal, and hence conclude that he is entitled to equal privileges and rights with the white man. If their premises were correct, their conclusions would be logical and just but their premise being wrong, their whole argument fails. I recollect once of having heard a gentleman from one of the northern States, of great power and ability, announce in the House of Representatives, with imposing effect, that we of the South would be compelled, ultimately, to yield upon this subject of slavery, that it was as impossible to war successfully against a principle in politics, as it was in physics or mechanics. That the principle would ultimately prevail. That we, in maintaining slavery as it exists with us, were warring against a principle, a principle founded in nature, the principle of the equality of men. The reply I made to him was, that upon his own grounds, we should, ultimately, succeed, and that he and his associates, in this crusade against our institutions, would ultimately fail. The truth announced, that it was as impossible to war successfully against a principle in politics as it was in physics and mechanics, I admitted; but told him that it was he, and those acting with him, who were warring against a principle. They were attempting to make things equal which the Creator had made unequal.

The historical record is clear as to what the Confederacy was and the fact that people like Stewart continue to lie about it is troublesome, to say the least.

FILED UNDER: Campaign 2018, Congress, US Politics, , , , , , , ,
Doug Mataconis
About Doug Mataconis
Doug holds a B.A. in Political Science from Rutgers University and J.D. from George Mason University School of Law. He joined the staff of OTB in May 2010. Before joining OTB, he wrote at Below The BeltwayThe Liberty Papers, and United Liberty Follow Doug on Twitter | Facebook

Comments

  1. CSK says:

    They don’t want to come right out and say that secession was about slavery, so they claim it was about “states’ rights.” The only right they wanted was the right to keep slaves.

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  2. James Pearce says:

    It makes me sad that Jeongish “end of white people” rhetoric has given this “white nationalism” crap a respectable sheen to some people. I can’t even take comfort from the fact that they were all deplorable already.

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  3. Yank says:

    VA GOP is on path to go the same way the CA GOP went.

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  4. He promised that his campaign for the senate would be “vicious and ruthless.”

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  5. SenyorDave says:

    If nothing else Stewart just got his street cred with the the hardcore Republicans in Virginia.

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  6. MarkedMan says:

    @James Pearce: I see what you did there! Oh you are a clever one, James Pearce! Now what about Hillary?

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  7. MarkedMan says:

    Years ago on OTB when there was post about the Confederacy, there would be a crew of regulars who would “educate” us on states rights, and how Lee was anti-slavery and that the original Klan was really just an anti-crime neighborhood group. They don’t seem to come around here to say that any more. I guess we must’ve convinced them they were wrong….

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  8. James Pearce says:

    @MarkedMan: I know, I know….you thought that a decade of telling white kids raised post-Crash to check their privilege meant they were going to check their privilege. Turns out, they go join the Proud Boys instead.

    High five, guys.

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  9. Stormy Dragon says:

    Also caught on video: Devin Nunes telling GOP donors that they need to keep control of congress in November so that they can keep obstructing justice for Trump.

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  10. KM says:

    @James Pearce:

    Turns out, they go join the Proud Boys instead.

    Douche’s gonna douche, man. Any male who’d join the Proud Boys was never going to end up a real man anyways. Fight Club wannabes are as old as time and been begging for someone to notice how manly they are as they get punched over cereals, realizing how much they suck. Notice how few productive, traditional examples of masculinity join groups like that.

    Seriously, you knew kids doing this in grade school. Little boys playing games. Grown men doing it is just sad AF.

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  11. Daryl and his brother Darryl says:

    Always remember; the confederates were traitors to their country, and they lost.
    And no matter what anyone tries to say, the Civil War was about keeping slaves.
    It does explain their love of Dennison, who is clearly a traitor himself and a yuuuge racist to boot.

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  12. Daryl and his brother Darryl says:

    Laura Ingraham got into a little racism herself:

    “Massive demographic changes have been foisted upon the American people, and they are changes that none of us ever voted for, and most of us don’t like. From Virginia to California, we see stark examples of how radically, in some ways, the country has changed.”

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  13. MarkedMan says:

    @KM: Here’s our man Pearce’s schtick. He comes here to pretend he is liberal and anti-Trump. In real life he’s a Trump supporter who thinks he’s being very clever. (He’s not.). He leads with feigned disapproval of his boy only in order to throw shade and, tricksy tricksy, cast doubt into the minds of the lurkers on this site (and no doubt, other sites too). So a constant refrain from him is that you shouldn’t be calling out or attacking Trump or the Republicans in whatever way you happen to be doing it. Note that it doesn’t actually matter how you are calling out the Republi-Trumps, whether you are pointing out that Trump bragged about grabbing women by the p*ssy, or having secret meetings with the Russians, or promoting racist confederacy ideals. 100% of the time his response is to a) “warn” us that pursuing this line of attack only plays into Trump’s master plan, b) “warn” us that pursuing this line of attack only makes the Republicans mad so they have to hit us because we were asking for it, or c) just go in for distraction and use the comment as an excuse to bring up something that he wants to discuss instead, something that might conceivably divide the anti-Trumpers and get a heated argument going about another subject entirely. So we get Hillary’s emails, or Jeong is a racist, or some other nonsense.

    In this post he manage to roll b and c together. Well done, James!

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  14. Yank says:

    Here’s our man Pearce’s schtick. He comes here to pretend he is liberal and anti-Trump. In real life he’s a Trump supporter who thinks he’s being very clever. (He’s not.)

    He is not a Trump supporter. He is just an old white guy who likes to blame the left for why his family and friends are racists.

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  15. Mikey says:

    @Yank: He’s basically the epitome of the “white moderate” MLK wrote about.

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  16. OzarkHillbilly says:

    @James Pearce: James, your analysis of what motivates these people is as shallow as your experience with them. Trust me, they were looking for an excuse long before anybody told them a simple truth in a way they could take umbrage with. What I don’t understand is why you feel the need to make excuses for them.

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  17. Daryl and his brother Darryl says:

    Has everyone seen, or read about, the Nunes tapes? In which he admits his goal is not to get to the truth about Dennison and Russia, but to defend Dennison should Mueller find wrong-doing.

    “If Sessions won’t unrecuse and Mueller won’t clear the president, we’re the only ones,” Nunes says on the tape, referring to his colleagues in the GOP-controlled House. “Which is really the danger.” He continues: “That’s why I keep — and thank you for saying it, by the way — I mean, we have to keep all these seats. We have to keep the majority. If we do not keep the majority, all of this goes away.”

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  18. Gustopher says:

    The historical record is clear as to what the Confederacy was and the fact that people like Stewart continue to lie about it is troublesome, to say the least.

    These Trumpers lie about what they said last week, even when presented with video evidence. Why would history be any different?

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  19. Kylopod says:

    So much for the “Party of Lincoln.”

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  20. Gustopher says:

    @MarkedMan: oh, good lord. He is not a Trumper. He’s a just a moderate Democrat of the scolding variety.

    Do you know how there are basically two types of Chrianity in this country — the “love and help thy neighbor” Christianity and the “you’re doing it wrong” Christianity? Pearce is like that second group, only with Democrats.

    No less infuriating at times. But not Actually the enemy.

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  21. Gustopher says:

    @Kylopod:

    So much for the “Party of Lincoln.”

    Fun Fact: Lincoln was a white supremacist.

    It’s true. For the longest time he wanted to ship the slaves back to Africa, to Liberia, where they would be free and nowhere near the white people.

    Just because you don’t think people should be enslaved doesn’t mean you think of them as equals.

    He recognized Fredrick Douglas an an intellectual heavyweight, but just believed there must be some white blood in there.

    He evolved a bit, partly from pragmatism (how would we get all the blacks to Liberia?) and partly through exposure (the black regiments in the civil war were better than he expected) but he was very much a product of his time, and his time was racist as fvck.

    He was an open-minded white supremacist. An inspiration to us all, in challenging our own beliefs and not getting caught up in dogma.

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  22. teve tory says:

    Daryl and his brother Darryl says:
    Thursday, August 9, 2018 at 14:42
    Laura Ingraham got into a little racism herself:

    “Massive demographic changes have been foisted upon the American people, and they are changes that none of us ever voted for, and most of us don’t like.

    Most Americans don’t like those demographic changes, Laura? Or most racist white people?

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  23. An Interested Party says:

    @James Pearce: Ahh, silly old man…if we want to find out who is causing all of these racists to come out from under their slimy rocks and proudly declare themselves, we need look no further than the fool in the White House…he is the person who is giving racism respectability to some people…he is the one who is getting praise from filth like David Duke…he is the one who is setting the tone and making it fashionable to hate “those people”…

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  24. teve tory says:

    @MarkedMan:

    MarkedMan says:
    Thursday, August 9, 2018 at 14:59
    @KM: Here’s our man Pearce’s schtick.

    I read the comments here. I don’t do that at 95% of sites I visit. But there are lots of smart commenters here who have things to contribute.

    There are also 5 or 6 commenters who are best skipped.

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  25. Just nutha ignint cracker says:

    @MarkedMan: Bunge tried the same step b thing in response to a comment I had made during the SHS restaurant fluff up. He warned me that my attitude of not caring that she was being discriminated against would only end up hurting my friends when the other side responded in kind.

    I don’t buy it when Pearce invokes it either.

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  26. teve tory says:

    So we get Hillary’s emails, or Jeong is a racist, or some other nonsense.

    Just FYI for everyone who isn’t following that story closely, taken out of context, a few of Jeong’s comments look racist. Read in context she was just being snarky. Alt-Right troll dipshits are trying to weaponize a few out of context comments.

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  27. Just nutha ignint cracker says:

    @Yank: No, you’re confusing him with *the Q.* Pearce is about the age of a Gen-Xer.

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  28. Not the IT Dept. says:

    It’s almost like Corey Stewart doesn’t know that the Democrats were the real racists.

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  29. OzarkHillbilly says:

    Noted radical Kevin Drum:

    Finally, when Mitt Romney lost in 2012, the party wrote a post-mortem that admitted they’d taken things as far as they could. The white vote was tapped out, and if they wanted to get to 51 percent in the future they needed to dial back on the racial appeals and instead learn how to attract Asians and Hispanics who were natural constituencies for a fiscally conservative, church-friendly party.

    I cheered. But only for a few days. A year earlier the party had fired its first black chairman, and in 2012 they tossed their post-mortem into the dustbin almost as soon as the ink was dry. Then it nominated Donald Trump for president on a platform so viciously racist and bigoted it was like watching an old Ken Burns documentary. The entire party quickly fell in line behind Trump, whose entire campaign was based on his disdain for (wink wink) “political correctness.” Two years later the GOP—including most of the original never-Trumpers—is even more solidly behind him: Mexicans are rapists; there are good people on both sides of Charlottesville; Obama was born in Kenya; Democrats love MS13; we need to prevent Muslims from entering the country; parents and children should be separated at the border; Southern secession was just like 1776; all’s fair in efforts to prevent blacks from voting; and white nationalists are to be coddled, not ridden out of town on a rail.

    So this is where we are. The Republican Party can’t win using ordinary methods. On the process side, they can win only by inflating the white vote via gerrymandering, cracked-and-packed districts, and ruthless black voter suppression. On the policy side, they can win only with heavy dollops of strident and outright bigotry against Mexicans, Muslims, blacks, Hispanics, Chinese, and anyone else who comes along. Even Canadians will do in a pinch.

    Today, the Republican Party exists for one and only one purpose: to pass tax cuts for the rich and regulatory rollbacks for corporations. They accomplish this using one and only method: unapologetically racist and bigoted appeals to win the votes of the heartland riff-raff they otherwise treat as mere money machines for their endless mail-order cons.

    Like it or not, this is the modern Republican Party. It no longer serves any legitimate purpose.

    I wonder how many more Proud Boys he made with those outlandish and intemperate statements. If only he talked nicely about Republicans, surely they would see the error of their ways.

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  30. MarkedMan says:

    @Gustopher:

    He is not a Trumper. He’s a just a moderate Democrat of the scolding variety.

    You may be right, and perhaps I’m guilty of near-Q level over analysis. But I think not. Nearly 100% of the time his comments fall into one or more of the three categories I listed above. On the very rare occasion when they don’t, they don’t involve politics.

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  31. Kylopod says:

    @Gustopher:

    Fun Fact: Lincoln was a white supremacist.

    I know. I was simply noting the irony that the so-called Party of Lincoln has become the party of apologists for the enemy Lincoln was fighting. This is nothing new, of course. For example, during the 2008 Republican Convention Mike Huckabee made the following curious remark:

    “Centralized governments may care for you from cradle to grave, but they also control you…. Abraham Lincoln reminded us that a government that can do everything for us can also take everything from us.”

    To this day, for the life of me I can’t figure out what Huck was saying here. He might have been praising Lincoln as a small-government conservative–a characterization that would be wildly ahistorical. On the other hand, he might have been condemning Lincoln as a tyrant, the man who utilized the oppressive federal government to “take everything from” the South. That would not be an uncommon perspective for a modern Arkansas Republican who has defended the Confederate Flag, but it’s not something Republicans with national aspirations are normally frank about. It seemed to me that Huck was deliberately trying to make his statement ambiguous so that it would be interpreted differently depending on who was hearing it.

    Republicans today want to have it both ways: to bask in Lincoln’s exalted reputation while at the same time pandering to those who celebrate his enemies.

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  32. James Pearce says:

    Any male who’d join the Proud Boys was never going to end up a real man anyways.

    Or they’re joining the Proud Boys because emasculation and resentment is all they can expect to get out of illiberal progressives…

    Here’s our man Pearce’s schtick.

    And I thought my schtick was to give you an account of how things look through my eyes. I get that my perspective means nothing to many of the posters here.

    I do not share that opinion.

    He is just an old white guy who likes to blame the left for why his family and friends are racists.

    I’m only 41, so probably younger than many of you. And why is it that when I call out racism on the left, I’m always accused of excusing it on the right?

    Why is it so difficult to accept that racism in this country hasn’t actually been defeated?

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  33. SenyorDave says:

    @Daryl and his brother Darryl: Has everyone seen, or read about, the Nunes tapes? In which he admits his goal is not to get to the truth about Dennison and Russia, but to defend Dennison should Mueller find wrong-doing.

    His opponent in November should just have a campaign ad where all they do is play the tape with some simple voice-over commentary like “Is this person’s first loyalty to the country or to the President?”

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  34. Gustopher says:

    @James Pearce:

    Or they’re joining the Proud Boys because emasculation and resentment is all they can expect to get out of illiberal progressives…

    Speaking of emasculating Proud Boys…

    Proud Boy fails to rip up sign.

    It’s so wonderful. Make sure to watch with the sound, as the running commentary is extra good.

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  35. Hal_10000 says:

    The funny thing here is that Stewart is not from Virginia; he’s from Minnesota. This is not about heritage. It’s either about being a garbage or pretending to be one because he thinks Virginians are morons.

    Either way, if you can’t vote for Kaine, vote for the Libertarian. This garbage fire should not get a single vote.

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  36. James Pearce says:

    @Gustopher:

    It’s so wonderful. Make sure to watch with the sound, as the running commentary is extra good.

    Is it wonderful though?

    I mean, I was down with the “laugh at em” mode back in 2016, but in 2018, with Trump in the White House and “Proud” Boys in the streets, I have to ask, who’s laughing now?

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  37. Just nutha ignint cracker says:

    @SenyorDave:

    His opponent in November should just have a campaign ad where all they do is play the tape with some simple voice-over commentary like “Is this person’s first loyalty to the country or to the President?”

    Don’t know about Nunes constituency, but I live in a county in Washington State that went 68% Trump and is about as red as they come on the state map. Here, most people would probably answer that question

    Of course his loyalty is to the President. If we’re not loyal to our President, we won’t have a country much longer.

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  38. Just nutha ignint cracker says:

    @James Pearce: I am! It was hilarious! (I’m also gravitating back to not reading posts from you. Count it as a victory for your purity if you wish.)

    I mean, come on–the guy is not smart enough to know that you can’t tear a corrugated plastic sign and stays there being filmed for several minutes. How am I supposed to take him seriously?

    ETA: I promise not to feed the troll again this thread.

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  39. Blue Galangal says:

    @MarkedMan: A very accomplished concern troll is how I’ve categorized him.

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  40. SenyorDave says:

    @Just nutha ignint cracker: That is why I could never imagine running for office. The fact that anybody could possibly place loyalty to any politician over loyalty to country stuns me, but I guess a large amount of Trump’s support would definitely go that way.
    I still think if I were Nunes’ opponent I would still go after him for his statements. If it doesn’t bother someone Nunes was going to get that person’s vote anyway, and maybe some people on the fence might be swayed.

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  41. MarkedMan says:

    Doug (or James or Steve or Stephen), speaking for myself, I would actually appreciate a post and a discussion thread on Jeong, and on other topics such as political correctness at universities and the like. Trump is an idiot and a traitor and the Republicans are Quislings, but there are real issues that are worth discussion.

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  42. Gustopher says:

    @James Pearce:

    I mean, I was down with the “laugh at em” mode back in 2016, but in 2018, with Trump in the White House and “Proud” Boys in the streets, I have to ask, who’s laughing now?

    I get that you want us all the be excellent to one another, and shrug off abortion, and concentrate on what makes us all the same while singing Kumbaya, but that’s not going to work — not alone.

    There is no one thing that will change America, or bring us all together, or even slow the far right’s assault on America. Go with all of it at once.

    Laughing at a sad little Proud Boy is a good thing. Turning their entire organization into a laughing stock would be a great thing.

    Sure, we also need lawsuits, voter registration campaigns, and even seeking common ground and singing Kumbaya, but making fascism uncool is also a big thing.

    Pitchforks have multiple prongs.

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  43. DrDaveT says:

    @James Pearce:

    because emasculation and resentment is all they can expect

    Being a reasonable human being is emasculating? Is that really how it looks through your eyes?

    Why is it so difficult to accept that racism in this country hasn’t actually been defeated?

    Um, who are you saying thinks racism has been defeated? It’s pretty obvious that racism is thriving — back out in the open, after a long period of pretending. Why do you think this isn’t an improvement? Isn’t it much easier to confront things when they’re out in the open like that?

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  44. Yank says:

    I’m only 41, so probably younger than many of you. And why is it that when I call out racism on the left, I’m always accused of excusing it on the right?

    Why is it so difficult to accept that racism in this country hasn’t actually been defeated?

    The problem is you like to make a false equivalence between the left and the right when it comes to racism and this in effect minimizes the problem. Sarah Jeong saying mean things about white people isn’t all that important. It is crass and unprofessional, but at the end of the day it has zero impact on the lives of white americans. Yet, intentionally or unintentionally, people like you like to treat that on par with actually racism that matters (ex. racial profiling, systematic racism that upholds the white power structure etc.) and that is the problem.

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  45. James Pearce says:

    @Just nutha ignint cracker:

    How am I supposed to take him seriously?

    You don’t have to take him “seriously” to understand and lament how he came to be. You don’t even have to agree with him. You can even pity him a little.

    But you should at least know that if the progressive left doesn’t want to be this dude’s refuge, someone else will, and I kind of wish that would sink before an entire generation of young white men decides that they have no need of liberalism because liberalism doesn’t work for them.

    A very accomplished concern troll

    So you think I’m “very accomplished”…

    making fascism uncool is also a big thing.

    And yet, it seems to me that, the opposite is happening. Our political culture is so toxic, people want to scratch at the resulting eczema with fascism. Why?

    Being a reasonable human being is emasculating?

    No, that’s my point. The emasculating BS that comes with each helping of social justice rhetoric isn’t reasonable or all that helpful.

    Sarah Jeong saying mean things about white people isn’t all that important.

    Here’s the thing that gets me about Jeong: If you’re an underprivileged minority, you can spend years being racist on Twitter and not only is it okay because you’re an underprivileged minority, but it might also be the way you stand out enough to get on the NY Times editorial board.

    If you’re Roseanne, though….

    The double standard is so glaring and so obvious that even a Trump supporter can see it. Why can’t the average lefty? Instead we get this “racism that actually matters” stuff. What I’m trying to say is that Jeongish racism –casual, pervasive, and anti-white– matters too. You just can’t do that stuff.

    You certainly can’t do that stuff and expect to be considered an oracle on racial equality or that it won’t have a reaction. Doesn’t the last few years prove that definitively?

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  46. Michael Reynolds says:

    I hate to say it but @Pearce is right: Left-wing bigotry is hurting the Left. Guess what percentage of Hillary voters were white? 60%. White voters remain the largest single component of Democratic voters and attacks on them, attacks that are not based on actions or ideology but simply on race, are by definition racist.

    Now, does this anti-white racism equal anti-black racism? No, of course not. There is no equivalency in terms of impact. It wasn’t white bodies that inspired Strange Fruit. But the progressive Left’s habit of attacking its allies is absolutely self-destructive. As is giving the Right ammunition.

    There is no equivalency in terms of impact. 90% of white people could not care less that someone calls them a ‘cracker,’ while 90% of black people are justifiably sick of the N word. To pretend that whites generally are victims is absurd: we have all the political power plus all the money, and we have since 1776.

    But, that said, politically it’s just fcking stupid. And we cannot afford stupid.

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  47. teve tory says:

    kevin drum:

    As a sort of PS to my post yesterday about the decay that’s overtaken the Republican Party, I’d like to make clear just how long this has been brewing. I know this is hardly news to anyone who reads this blog, but as I approach my 60th birthday I can say that half my life has now been marked by Rush Limbaugh, the Drudge Report, Newt Gingrich, the Vince Foster suicide, Whitewater, the Rose law firm, Filegate, the Christmas card list scandal, Fox News, Monica Lewinsky, impeachment, the Florida recount, Swift boating, the GOP’s partywide effort to suppress black votes via photo ID laws, birtherism, the unanimous Republican rejection of the 2009 stimulus, Benghazi, Emailgate, Merrick Garland, and now the endless haze of racism, bigotry, and corruption surrounding Donald Trump.

    This is very much a non-exhaustive list. But every one of these things is either a baseless “scandal,” an example of ethical rot, or part of a deliberate media effort to lie and mislead. These are the highlights of the Republican Party over the past three decades. No political party with a rap sheet like this deserves to be walking around free.

    GOPus delendus est.

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  48. Yank says:

    Here’s the thing that gets me about Jeong: If you’re an underprivileged minority, you can spend years being racist on Twitter and not only is it okay because you’re an underprivileged minority, but it might also be the way you stand out enough to get on the NY Times editorial board.

    If you’re Roseanne, though….

    The double standard is so glaring and so obvious that even a Trump supporter can see it. Why can’t the average lefty? Instead we get this “racism that actually matters” stuff. What I’m trying to say is that Jeongish racism –casual, pervasive, and anti-white– matters too. You just can’t do that stuff.

    You certainly can’t do that stuff and expect to be considered an oracle on racial equality or that it won’t have a reaction. Doesn’t the last few years prove that definitively?

    Roseanne was dropped because advertisers were starting to pull out. It was a pure business decision by ABC. No one outside of twitter knows who the hell Jeong is. If she were impacting the NYT’s bottomline, then she would have been gone. On top of that this is perfect example of the false equivalence I am talking about. What Jeong’s tweeted was no where near as bad as what Roseanne tweeted.

    BTW, Trump supporters don’t give a crap about Jeong. They fan outcry, because they know they can exploit moderates like you to make a false equivalence between personal racism and systematic racism that maintains white supremacy.

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  49. Kylopod says:

    @Yank:

    BTW, Trump supporters don’t give a crap about Jeong. They fan outcry, because they know they can exploit moderates like you to make a false equivalence between personal racism and systematic racism that maintains white supremacy.

    It has long been a rallying cry among white racist conservatives to complain about “reverse racism.” I think of when Pat Buchanan in the early ’90s defended David Duke by telling his fellow conservatives to “take a hard look at Duke’s portfolio of winning issues” such as “reverse discrimination against white folks.”

    Of course they don’t give a crap about Jeong’s remarks, but there is a real contingent of white people who do feel genuinely threatened by what they see as a wave of political correctness which they believe holds them back in life. A white person who gets passed over for a position to a minority will often wind up believing the minority only got the position because of affirmative action, whatever the facts of the matter may be.

    That’s the seductive appeal of complaints over alleged anti-white bias: they become an all-purpose explanation that whites can use to attack minorities while thinking they’re the ones fighting racism rather than perpetuating it. It was exemplified by Rush Limbaugh’s comments on Donovan McNabb that got him fired from ESPN. In Limbaugh’s telling, he wasn’t saying black people can’t be good quarterbacks, he was saying the media have a habit of overrating black quarterbacks. Of course once you accept that premise you can question the ability of any black quarterback who comes along: just claim everyone else is guilty of bias and you’re the one seeing the unvarnished truth. It’s a perfect excuse because it’s airtight. And for white people with an overwhelming desire to believe the world is stacked against them, this way of thinking can be very seductive.

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  50. James Pearce says:

    @Michael Reynolds:

    I hate to say it but @Pearce is right:

    (☉_☉) Woah.

    Bottom line: The cause of anti-racism cannot be advanced by racists.

    @Yank:

    What Jeong’s tweeted was no where near as bad as what Roseanne tweeted.

    What utter crap. Jeong’s five years of “cancel white people” tweets are much worse than that one time Roseanne made fun of Valerie Jarrett.

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  51. Monala says:

    @Michael Reynolds: I agree. I hate the defenses of Jeong. She is free to tweet the way she does, and I understand her motivations, but to then be given a platform at the NYT does make liberals seem like hypocrites, and hurts us.

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  52. Yank says:

    What utter crap. Jeong’s five years of “cancel white people” tweets are much worse than that one time Roseanne made fun of Valerie Jarrett.

    https://twitter.com/sarahjeong/status/534826243389423617

    Oh please, go read the thread that lead up to that tweet. It was no where near as bad as what Roseanne said about Jarrett. Again, this is the crap I am talking about when it comes to race and you moderates, you guys can’t see spot the differences if it slapped you in the face.

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  53. An Interested Party says:

    But you should at least know that if the progressive left doesn’t want to be this dude’s refuge, someone else will, and I kind of wish that would sink before an entire generation of young white men decides that they have no need of liberalism because liberalism doesn’t work for them.

    How could anyone who has the mindset to join this idiotic association ever find common cause with liberalism…

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  54. James Pearce says:

    @Yank:

    Again, this is the crap I am talking about when it comes to race and you moderates, you guys can’t see spot the differences if it slapped you in the face.

    Differences? Both women wrote racist tweets.

    The only difference is in quantity, not quality.

    @An Interested Party:

    How could anyone who has the mindset to join this idiotic association ever find common cause with liberalism…

    Personal growth and maturity. Mentorship. I can think of a lot of ways. You can’t?

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  55. An Interested Party says:

    Personal growth and maturity. Mentorship. I can think of a lot of ways. You can’t?

    It certainly would take a lot of growth and maturity to get rid of the chauvinistic thinking of that organization…you be sure to track down that guy who couldn’t rip up the sign and show him some mentorship…let me know how that works out for you…

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  56. Just nutha ignint cracker says:

    @James Pearce: (I’m breaking my promise, but only because I feel the comment is important to make, sorry.)

    But you should at least know that if the progressive left doesn’t want to be this dude’s refuge, someone else will, and I kind of wish that would sink before an entire generation of young white men decides that they have no need of liberalism because liberalism doesn’t work for them.

    I see where the break is. There is enough evangelical in your outlook to see everyone as “reachable.” Dr. James Kennedy wrote a book ages ago called Evangelical Explosion. In it, he posited his theory that when the “message of the gospel” is not enough, if you will, you change the message to appeal to “the needs, wants, desires” of the target audience. (This probably explains quite a bit about the cognitive dissonance that goes with understanding what Evangelicals are thinking by supporting Trump, BTW.) It comes to “the flock” in messages on the passage about Jesus and the “woman at the well;” in fact, one such message that I heard was titled by the pastor who presented it “Jesus-The Master Salesman.”

    Kennedy’s theory, I propose, is at the root of whatever passes for a message in your mini sermons/screeds about *progressives* as you define them.

    I gave up believing that everyone was “reachable” a long time ago. I rejected Kennedy’s idea at first glance because I didn’t believe that 1) the Gospel is a sales pitch, and 2) that I should treat things that I hold as universal truths as malleable elements in the aforementioned sales pitch. As Ann Wilson so eloquently put it, “I can’t sell you what you don’t want to buy.” Moreover, while I think that there are a lot of things schools could (hypothetically) do better, I’ve seen kids throw themselves under buses of their own design every day of my career as a teacher. I believe that most people I encounter are not deluded, misinformed, deceived, beset by Satan, or anything else. The decisions they make are mostly based on who they are, who they aspire to be, and what they want the world to look like. Proud boys, gang bangers, whatever, most people are also what Rogers called “congruent” and so, are unavailable for redemption of any sort. They are who they want to be. Protestations that they are products of the society (even though they are that) are mostly just lame-ass justifications they use when they’re not with their homs.

    Finally, I hope that your generation (I’m easily old enough to be your father) is not a monolithic as you seem to believe it is. Either way, we’re gonna have a “generation of Proud Boys” no matter what, because some people–and waaayyyyy more than you imagine–just want to hate.

    Back to you…

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  57. Just nutha ignint cracker says:

    @Kylopod:

    A white person who gets passed over for a position to a minority will often wind up believing the minority only got the position because of affirmative action, whatever the facts of the matter may be.

    This feeling affects many people of minority extraction, too. Richard Rodriguez wrote about the phenomenon in Hunger for Memory IIRC.

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  58. James Pearce says:

    @An Interested Party:

    It certainly would take a lot of growth and maturity to get rid of the chauvinistic thinking of that organization

    @Just nutha ignint cracker:

    I gave up believing that everyone was “reachable” a long time ago.

    I don’t think every Proud Boy is redeemable, but I’ve seen the documentaries about former skinheads removing the racist tattoos from their faces. I have to think a not-so-insignificant number of the Proud Boys are going to realize they don’t want to devote their lives to white supremacy when all they want to do is “own the libs” during Trump’s presidency and they too will walk away from the movement.

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