Whites Now Minority of American Births: So What?

White babies now constitute slightly less than half of American births.

The long-predicted has happened: White babies now constitute slightly less than half of American births. At least, if we don’t count white Hispanic babies.

NYT (“Whites Account for Under Half of Births in U.S.“)

After years of speculation, estimates and projections, the Census Bureau has made it official: White births are no longer a majority in the United States.

Non-Hispanic whites accounted for 49.6 percent of all births in the 12-month period that ended last July, according to Census Bureau data made public on Thursday, while minorities — including Hispanics, blacks, Asians and those of mixed race — reached 50.4 percent, representing a majority for the first time in the country’s history.

Such a turn has been long expected, but no one was certain when the moment would arrive — signaling a milestone for a nation whose government was founded by white Europeans and has wrestled mightily with issues of race, from the days of slavery, through a civil war, bitter civil rights battles and, most recently, highly charged debates over efforts to restrict immigration.

While over all, whites will remain a majority for some time, the fact that a younger generation is being born in which minorities are the majority has broad implications for the country’s economy, its political life and its identity. “This is an important tipping point,” said William H. Frey, the senior demographer at the Brookings Institution, describing the shift as a “transformation from a mostly white baby boomer culture to the more globalized multiethnic country that we are becoming.”

Signs that the country is evolving this way start with the Oval Office, and have swept hundreds of counties in recent years, with 348 in which whites are no longer in the majority. That number doubles when it comes to the toddler population, Mr. Frey said. Whites are no longer the majority in four states and the District of Columbia, and have slipped below half in many major metro areas, including New York, Las Vegas and Memphis.

A more diverse young population forms the basis of a generational divide with the country’s elderly, a group that is largely white and grew up in a world that was too.

WaPo (“Census: Minority babies are now majority in United States“):

For the first time in U.S. history, most of the nation’s babies are members of minority groups, according to new census figures that signal the dawn of an era in which whites no longer will be in the majority.

Population estimates show that 50.4 percent of children younger than 1 last year were Hispanic, black, Asian American or in other minority groups. That’s almost a full percentage point higher than the 49.5 percent of minority babies counted when the decennial census was taken in April 2010. Census Bureau demographers said the tipping point came three months later, in July.

The latest estimates, which gauge changes since the last census, are a reflection of an immigration wave that began four decades ago. The transformation of the country’s racial and ethnic makeup has gathered steam as the white population grows collectively older, especially compared with Hispanics.

The census has forecast that non-Hispanic whites will be outnumbered in the United States by 2042, and social scientists consider that current status among infants a harbinger of the change.

“This is a watershed moment,” said Andrew Cherlin, a sociologist at Johns Hopkins University who specializes in family issues. “It shows us how multicultural we’ve become.”

Although minorities make up about 37 percent of the U.S. population, the District and four states are majority minority — California, Hawaii, New Mexico and Texas.

While this may be a statistical watershed, it’s not at all clear that it much matters in the short term.

A decade ago, Ruy Teixeira and John Judis forecast The Emerging Democratic Majority, which argued that the rise in minority voting power spells doom for the GOP. Some far-right commenters on this site have embraced that prediction with despair. But this presumes that blacks and Hispanics will continue the voting patterns of past generations and that the two American political parties will forever more hold the same policy positions as they do now. Both are highly dubious.

Hispanics, in particular, are a very diverse group. And there’s good reason to think that those in the second, third, and fourth generation will increasingly identify with the United States, not their country of origin.

Additionally, while many longtime Republicans, such as myself and former Senator Chuck Hagel*, despair at the hard right retrenchment our party has undergone over the last couple of years, we have over 150 years evidence that parties evolve. We’re seeing massive cultural shifts at an unprecedented speed and people are quite naturally up in arms about it.  But issues like gay marriage simply won’t be on the agenda a decade from now, much less in 2042.

Thirty years is a long, long time in American politics. Thirty years ago, Ronald Reagan was just getting settled in to the Oval Office and the notion that married, middle class women would have careers outside the home was scandalous. Thirty years before that, Harry Truman was in the last days of his presidency and he’d shocked the nation’s consciousness decreeing that black men would be allowed to serve in our armed forces as equal citizens.  Thirty years before that, Warren Harding was serving his short tenure as president, women had just been granted the right to vote in federal elections, and the Constitution had been amended to outlaw the sale of alcoholic beverages.

I haven’t the foggiest notion what issues will divide Democrats and Republicans thirty years from now but am confident it won’t be the social issues that have dominated the 2012 cycle thus far. (Except for Jimmy Carter and Reverend Wright; they will of course always be with us.)

UPDATE: I neglected to develop the argument I hinted at with the introductory quip: the degree to which “race” is a social construct. I don’t mean that in the pedantic, academic sense that we can’t technically define it so that it therefore doesn’t exist. There’s a reason that Barack Obama identifies himself as a black man even though his mother was white and he was raised by his white grandparents in places where the American black-white divide didn’t much matter.  But it’s worth noting that our definition of “white” in this context has evolved considerably.

Once upon a time in America, “white” meant of English or German descent. Even the Irish didn’t count as white, much less Italians. Within living memory, Jews didn’t count.  Now, these people all get lumped together into this concept we call “white.” If that hadn’t changed, we’d have crossed this imaginary threshold quite a long time ago.

__________
*In full disclosure, Hagel is my boss’ boss. While we more-or-less agree on this issue, it’s unlikely, indeed, that he much cares. If I had to guess, the majority of my colleagues are Democrats and he’s shown no indication that he cares about that, either.

FILED UNDER: *FEATURED, Best of OTB, Race and Politics, US Politics
James Joyner
About James Joyner
James Joyner is a Security Studies professor at Marine Corps University's Command and Staff College and a nonresident senior fellow at the Scowcroft Center for Strategy and Security at the Atlantic Council. He's a former Army officer and Desert Storm vet. Views expressed here are his own. Follow James on Twitter @DrJJoyner.

Comments

  1. Chad S says:

    As long as the GOP is the party of Dixie and hostility towards immigrants, they’ll lose the black/latin vote.

  2. al-Ameda says:

    Speaking as a white guy, I can think of at least one salutary effect of the changing demographic: fewer future Tea Party members, and more likelihood that we will return to better governance in Washington.

  3. James Joyner says:

    @Chad S: Sure. Which is why they’ll change course over time.

  4. Oh superdestroyeeeerrrrrr…. we’re coming for yooooooouuuuu…….

  5. Tillman says:

    They’d better change in a couple of cycles then, ’cause minorities? They remember everything. Can’t mention slavery around Hispanic people without them asking how black people are doing nowadays, and then the conversation gets awkward.

    Don’t even get me started on black people and the annexation of Texas.

  6. Neil Hudelson says:

    Thirty years ago, Ronald Reagan was just getting settled in to the Oval Office and the notion that married, middle class women would have careers outside the home was scandalous. Thirty years before that, Harry Truman was in the last days of his presidency and he’d shocked the nation’s consciousness decreeing that black men would be allowed to serve in our armed forces as equal citizens. Thirty years before that, Warren Harding was serving his short tenure as president, women had just been granted the right to vote in federal elections, and the Constitution had been amended to outlaw the sale of alcoholic beverages.

    Good way to put it in perspective. I think I will use this in future conversations.

  7. Hey Norm says:

    I long for a day when American births don’t have to catagorized as such.
    I’m a dreamer…I know. Probably won’t live to see it.

    @ Neil…
    Sunday marks the first Sunday that liquor will be sold on Sunday in Connecticut. Change is constant…but slow as all get-out.

  8. Gustopher says:

    Wait, this is happening now? Not in some far off distant future? Oh my god, Superdestroyer was right, we’re doomed!

  9. walt moffett says:

    Always interesting to drive around Dixie and note the many fundie churches and their hispanic ministries and how quickly chorzio, eggs and grits platters hit the breakfast menu.

  10. Chad S says:

    @James Joyner: I buy moving towards the latin vote more, but getting the black vote will be extremely difficult even out into the future. The only way I could see it happening is if the demographics of the south change so much that the Dems put SC, GA, Texas and Louisiana in play so that the GOP has to appeal to the western/rust belt voters more.

  11. michael reynolds says:

    @Neil Hudelson:

    Good way to put it in perspective. I think I will use this in future conversations.

    Me too. And of course pretend it’s mine.

  12. michael reynolds says:

    It’s the end of the world as we know it. And I feel fine.

  13. anjin-san says:

    Gotta be a rough day for people that are pining for a fantasy Leave it to Beaver America.

    I wonder if folks like super realize that if they could wave a magic wand and transform our country into an all-white America, we would probably die of boredom within 6 months…

  14. Hey Norm says:

    You kick this by saying it has been long-predicted, and:

    “…it’s not at all clear that it much matters in the short term…”

    But we are already seeing the effects…and exactly because people have long seen it coming.
    This is the entire raison d’etre for the Tea Party…a bunch of well-off old white surburanites who think this is their country and are scared shitless by what is happening. (refer also — anything written by Pat Buchanan)
    They weren’t bitching when Bush43 was squandering a surplus…and they weren’t congratulating Obama when he cut almost everyone’s taxes.
    As Sullivan correctly points out…to miss the connection between this story and the Rickett’s/Reverend Wright story (which you also have up) is to miss the forest for the trees.

  15. george says:

    @michael reynolds:

    Isn’t there a famous quote regarding Oscar Wilde – Wilde says something like “I wish I’d said that.”, and his friend replies, “You will Oscar, you will.”

    I agree, it definitely puts things in perspective.

  16. Franklin says:

    The part that caught my attention was mixed-race kids, since I have a couple myself. To be honest, I never really thought of them as minorities before. Guess I’ll have to start treating them different! 🙂

  17. Franklin says:

    @anjin-san:

    transform our country into an all-white America, we would probably die of boredom within 6 months…

    Oh, come on, we’re not THAT boring. Haven’t you seen me dance?

  18. anjin-san says:

    Thirty years ago, Ronald Reagan was just getting settled in to the Oval Office and the notion that married, middle class women would have careers outside the home was scandalous.

    I kind of have to take issue with this. I was in the workforce at the time, and that was simply not the case, at least in my neck of the woods. You are off the mark by a decade.

  19. anjin-san says:

    Haven’t you seen me dance?

    Was that you workin’ it with Elaine Benice at the Palladium back in ’96?

  20. James Joyner says:

    @anjin-san: “Scandalous” might overstate the point; I was 14 at the time, so my recollection is skewed. But the ERA fight was on and almost all the lower middle class moms in my neighborhood, mine included, stayed home with the kids.

  21. Chad S says:

    @george: I think thats from a Monty Python skit lol

  22. James Joyner says:

    @anjin-san: Here’s the Wikipedia writeup of the history:

    The first phase encompasses the time between the late 19th century to the 1930s. This era gave birth to the ‘Independent female worker.’ From 1890-1930, women in the workforce were typically young and unmarried. They had little or no learning on the job and typically held clerical and teaching positions. Many women also worked in textile manufacturing or as domestics. Women promptly exited the work force when they were married, unless the family needed two incomes. Towards the end of the 1920s, as we enter into the second phase, married women begin to exit the work force less and less. Labor force productivity for married women 35–44 years of age increase by 15.5 percentage points from 10% to 25%. There was a greater demand for clerical positions and as the number of women graduating high school increased they began to hold more ‘respectable’, steady jobs. This phase has been appropriately labeled as the Transition Era referring to the time period between 1930-1950. During this time the discriminatory institution of marriage bars, which forced women out of the work force after marriage, were eliminated, allowing more participation in the work force of single and married women. Additionally, women’s labor force participation increased because there was an increase in demand for office workers and women participated in the high school movement. However, still women’s work was contingent upon their husband’s income. Women did not normally work to fulfill a personal need to define ones career and social worth; they worked out of necessity.

    In the third phase, labeled the “roots of the revolution” encompassing the time from 1950- mid-to-late 1970s, the movement began to approach the warning signs of a revolution. Women’s expectations of future employment changed. Women began to see themselves going on to college and working through their marriages and even attending graduate school. Many however still had brief and intermittent work force participation, without necessarily having expectations for a ‘career’. To illustrate, most women were secondary earners, and worked in “pink collar jobs” as secretaries, teachers, nurses, and librarians. Although more women attended college, it was often expected that they attended to find a spouse—the so-called “M.R.S. degree”. Nevertheless, Labor force participation by women still grew significantly.

    The fourth phase, known as the “Quiet Revolution”, began in the late 1970s and continues on today. Beginning in the 1970s women began to flood colleges and grad schools. They began to enter profession like medicine, law, dental and business. More women were going to college and expected to be employed at the age of 35, as opposed to past generations that only worked intermittently due to marriage and childbirth. This increase in expectations of long-term gainful employment is reflected in the change of majors adopted by women from the 1970s on. The percentage of women majoring in education declined beginning in the 1970s;[citation needed] education was once a popular major for women since it allowed them to step into and out of the labor force when they had children and when their children grew up to a reasonable age at which their mothers did not have to serve primarily as caretakers. Instead, majors such as business and management were on the rise in the 1970s, as women ventured into other fields that were once predominated by men.[citation needed] They experienced an expansion of their horizons and an alteration of what it meant to define their own identity. Women worked before they got married, and since women were marrying younger[citation needed] they were able to define themselves prior to a serious relationship.

    That comports with my contemporaneous recollection. I suspect that, like most cultural changes, they began earlier in California and major metropolitan areas.

  23. Hey Norm says:

    Thanks Reynolds…
    Now I can’t get that song out of my brain.

  24. PJ says:

    Thirty years is a long, long time in American politics. Thirty years ago…

    Which is why they’ll change course over time.

    About five times thirty years ago there wasn’t a Republican Party.

    Some times parties change, and some times they get replaced if they fail to change or if their name is too tarnished.

  25. michael reynolds says:

    @Hey Norm:
    It starts with an earthquake.

  26. Tsar Nicholas says:

    I don’t think it’s a coincidence that the very best places around the country in which to live are racial and cultural melting pots. San Diego and San Francisco immediately come to mind. Portland, Oregon also is one of my favorite cities, and that too is a racial and cultural melting pot. I for one would not want to live in a homogenized enclave. For that and other reasons I simply can’t figure out why people choose to live in places like the Hamptons.

  27. Hey Norm says:

    Very few people actually

    “…live in places like the Hamptons…”

    Those that do are pretty diverse.

  28. Neil Hudelson says:

    @Tsar Nicholas:

    The short time I spent in San Antonio gave me a similar impression. Well put.

  29. anjin-san says:

    @ Tsar

    Possibly the best comment you have ever made in here…

  30. Rob in CT says:

    Suuuuch superdestroyer bait.

    The sky has fallen!

  31. michael reynolds says:

    I live in Tiburon where I believe we still have one black person and as many as three Hispanics. My daughter is the Asian population.

    Exaggerating, but not by much.

    If I had my druthers I’d live in a sunnier London or a warmer New York. I love cities. The very best exercise in the world is a brisk walk through a city — NYC, London, Paris, Chicago, San Francisco, Amsterdam, Barcelona, Venice, Sydney. (Not LA of course because walking there is considered probable cause.)

  32. al-Ameda says:

    @Tsar Nicholas:
    I

    don’t think it’s a coincidence that the very best places around the country in which to live are racial and cultural melting pots. San Diego and San Francisco immediately come to mind. Portland, Oregon also is one of my favorite cities, and that too is a racial and cultural melting pot.

    I agree. I live in the Bay Area and I’ve lived in Seattle for a few years too. For the reasons you stated I would live in any of the cities going up the west coast, from San Diego to L.A. to the Bay Area to Portland, Seattle and Vancouver BC. It’s also why I really like to visit New York City.

  33. James Joyner says:

    @michael reynolds: DC is an odd exception. Walking here is much like driving here. There’s a light at every intersection to ensure you get nowhere fast. Even adjusting course, so that I just move closer to my destination in whichever way the lights will allow, I still find it maddening. Oddly, I’ve never had that sensation in New York, Chicago, Amsterdam, or other cities. Then again, I was just visiting for a few days.

  34. al-Ameda says:

    @michael reynolds:

    I live in Tiburon

    I grew up in San Anselmo and I believe that San Anselmo now has more than 3 Hispanics and 1 Asian.

  35. Catfish says:

    I agree that this is not news and not important. No more important than 20% of the population being related to Ghenghis Khan and my being 31.1% Viking. (I am 99.9% southern). These type of studies don’t bother me one way or the other, unless someday they come out and report that the “transgender population now numbers 50%”. But then, what would that really mean?.

  36. Tsar Nicholas says:

    @Hey Norm: Diversity in the Hamptons? Maybe we’re talking about different places with the same name. I’m referring to the playground for rich white folks at the very eastern end of Long Island, N.Y. If someone told me that they’d give me a million dollars cash on condition that I move there and live there for the next 20 years I might actually turn down the money. Seriously. Now, that said, for two million dollars I’d pretty much do anything.

    @Neil Hudelson: San Antonio is a great city. A friend of mine from college lived and worked there for many years. My best buddy from law school was married there. I love that city.

    @anjin-san: Well, I do represent the dark side, of course, but still occasionally I have my good moments and my redeeming qualities.

  37. sam says:

    We are doomed because, as anyone with an ounce of sense knows, only white Anglo-Saxon Protestants are capable of understanding the principles upon which this country was founded.

  38. al-Ameda says:

    @sam:

    We are doomed because, as anyone with an ounce of sense knows, only white Anglo-Saxon Protestants are capable of understanding the principles upon which this country was founded.

    If they know the principles then why are they (WASPs) so angry about illegal immigration, a great source of cheap labor, that type that built this country?

  39. Nikki says:

    @anjin-san: That’s just wrong.

  40. PD Shaw says:

    I’m not sure how I feel about this; the changes feel quite abrupt. My wife, who by family tradition has a Cherokee ancestor, has suddenly become a minority, and with her, so have our two children. I’m suddently “the white man” in a minority household and its like the whole world has shifted. Incredible that the Census Bureua picked up on these sudden changes.

  41. Tsar Nicholas says:

    @al-Ameda:

    San Diego – Yes, please.

    Los Angeles – Nah. Too much pretentiousness. Too much Botox. I still have negative flashbacks to my halcyon daze at USC.

    Bay Area – Definitely.

    Portland – Absolutely.

    Seattle – A little too much rain for my tastes. Portland has no sales tax. Portland has the Heathman restaurant. Portland has the Portland Zoo and the Rose Garden. Advantage: Portland.

    Vancouver BC. – Never been there, sadly enough, but I hear from everyone that it’s a dream. So, yes, please.

  42. @James Joyner:

    “Scandalous” might overstate the point;

    A bit, but I agree with the general notion. Certainly it was not the expected norm and was at least “controversial” at the time.

    Certainly the expectations of young women in college in 1981 were quite different than those in my classes. Even in the deep south it is clear that all of my students, male and female, have similar post-graduation expectations, i.e., they are career oriented.

  43. sam says:

    Geez, nobody’s mentioned Boston and Cambridge as a great walking cities. Every time you turn around, you see a piece our history. I may have told this here before, but… One day on my lunch hour, I strolled down by the Opera house in downtown Boston, if you know where that is, and went up some small side street. On one of the buildings, I saw this very weathered bronze plaque. I went up to it and read, “On this site on March 10, 1876, Alexander Graham Bell made the first telephone call.” Boston and Cambridge are full of history. EG, on Cambridge Common, Washington took command of the Continental Army. Old North Church. The King’s Chapel. The Freedom Trail, etc, etc, etc. (Go in the Spring, though….)

  44. anjin-san says:

    @Tsar

    Vancouver is a great city, and close to Victoria, which is a great place to spend some time.

  45. Hey Norm says:

    Tsar…
    I’ve lived in many tourist towns…and once the tourists leave…yup…plenty diverse.
    I suppose it’s like the seasons in Florida. You actually have to look to see them.
    But if you actually pay attention you are rewarded for your effort.
    Maybe you should try it more often???

  46. anjin-san says:

    @ al-Ameda

    You are a Drake guy?? I am still pissed at Drake for costing us a perfect football season about a million years ago. I ended up living in San An for 19 years. Great memories.

  47. anjin-san says:

    I live in Tiburon where I believe we still have one black person

    I tended bar in Tiburon for a few years in the early 80s. There was a persistent story that the local PD had a code word they used when a car with black folks in it was seen heading into town. It’s a story I believe.

  48. michael reynolds says:

    @al-Ameda:
    I dinner in San Anselmo last night. There’s a great Liquor/Cigar place on the main street, a couple good coffee shops, a good burger joint and the French place last night was pretty good.

    @James Joyner:

    Funny that DC didn’t come to mind. I’ve spent a couple years of my life in and around DC. I used to live in an apartment on New Hampshire Ave. It was the apartment right next to the trash room where bags of trash ended their 12 floor drop down the cute. Most of my furniture was technically cardboard.

    Walking in DC to me means sweating. I don’t think I’ve ever been more miserable than walking around DC in August in a suit. 38 years later and the memories still linger.

  49. anjin-san says:

    I dinner in San Anselmo last night. There’s a great Liquor/Cigar place on the main street

    Ludwig’s Liquor and Smoke Shop – a San Anselmo institution. I had frequent flyer miles there in my drinking days.

  50. michael reynolds says:

    @anjin-san:
    It’s one of the places that helped me to resign myself to Marin County. I checked out the selection and thought, “I can live among these people.”

  51. John D'Geek says:

    At a previous job, I had the opportunity to look through the County Jail records from the early 20’th century. It was different enough that I still remember some of the entries for “race” to this day: “American”, “English”, “German”, “Irish”, “Italian”. Only once did I see “black”. Only a handful of times did I see “White”.

    Apparently, at that time “White” and “Black” were the equivalent of “D&&^ed if I know!”.

  52. al-Ameda says:

    @anjin-san:

    Ludwig’s Liquor and Smoke Shop – a San Anselmo institution. I had frequent flyer miles there in my drinking days.

    Ludwig’s has been there a long time, I used to pick up a copy of the NYT there.
    There are 2 good coffee roastery places along the downtown stretch.

  53. James says:

    @sam: Boston and Cambridge are amazingly walkable cities. I’ve walked from Fenway to Park Street more times than I can count.

  54. anjin-san says:

    @ al-Ameda

    I liked San Anselmo Ave. more pre-flood, when it still had some of the funky hippie vibe going. Spent a lot of afternoons on the patio behind the cheese store when it was there, or at Le Bistro for coffee and Richard’s excellent croissants. Do you remember Tony Conigliaro’s health food store?

  55. Moderate Mom says:

    @James Joyner:

    And then there were women like my mother, that went back to work when their kids started school because they were bored at home all day. In 1980 she was a development executive with a major hotel chain.

    If you had said 1970 you would have been closer to the mark. By 1980 there were an awful lot of married women in the workforce.

  56. Once upon a time in America, “white” meant of English or German descent. Even the Irish didn’t count as white, much less Italians. Within living memory, Jews didn’t count. Now, these people all get lumped together into this concept we call “white.” If that hadn’t changed, we’d have crossed this imaginary threshold quite a long time ago.

    Indeed, when my Maternal Great-Grandparents came here from what is now Slovakia and settled in what was then a vibrant coal mining area around Scranton, PA, the Welsh-Irish residents that had been there for a generation or so referred to them as “dirty Huns” (odd, considering they were pretty far removed from being German). Even in the little town where my Mom grew up, there were separate Catholic Churches for the Polish, Slovak, Italian, and Irish communities.

    Much of what we call race really is just a social construct

  57. mike says:

    the only thing i can add is we have to many at one time.and no one to take good care of them all.we worked our asses off and we didnt need a slavewith no thought of havig one or a ny migrant workers we did it our family by ourselves.we kept right on going to this day.

  58. mike says:

    the only thing i can add is we have to many at one time.and no one to take good care of them all.we worked our asses off and we didnt need a slavewith no thought of having one or any migrant workers we did it our family by ourselves.we kept right on going to this day.

  59. CB says:

    @James:

    one of the absolute best. nothing beats walking along the canals in early spring.

  60. al-Ameda says:

    @anjin-san:
    I remember that patio behind the cheese store – very relaxing place to hangout. There was also one behind a coffee shop not far from Hilda’s. San Anselmo (and the entire Ross Valley for that matter) has the best weather in Marin County.

    I forget where Conigliaro’s Healthwise store was – was it up on SF Drake Blvd?

    Heavy rains create a nightmare for San Anselmo because the community has always rejected any flood control improvements that would change the creek dramatically.

  61. JKB says:

    Funny 30 years ago, the Republican party wasn’t the party of Dixie. And 30 years before that Dixie was decidedly Democrat run, white sheets and all.

    So you see, all kinds of changes to all kinds of political parties happen.

    The whole idea that 30 years ago a middle class woman working outside the home was scandalous, even in the South, seems off. True, I grew up on the poor side where as my aunt put it, she had all the equality she could handle going to work every day since she was 14 just like her husband. But I graduated high school in 1980 and I can’t think of one girl who expected to marry and stay home. Nor were any of the women in my engineering classes surprising. I think you are off a decade.

  62. anjin-san says:

    And 30 years before that Dixie was decidedly Democrat run, white sheets and all.

    Yes, and the bigots were by and large run out the the Democratic Party, so they went on the become Republicans. 30 years later, they are still welcomed with open arms by the GOP.

    BTW, wondering if you realize how ignorant “Democrat run” makes you sound. Perhaps you don’t, or perhaps you do and are waving the banner proudly.

  63. superdestroyer says:

    @al-Ameda:

    The demographics of the U.S. in the future is the politics of California today. Do you really believe that governance in California has benefited from Diversity?

  64. superdestroyer says:

    @Stormy Dragon:

    You may want to ask SGT Johnny Aparicio, assigned to McDill Air Force Base how diversity is working out for him.

    http://www.wtsp.com/news/article/255709/8/New-video-footage-may-reveal-car-of-Aparicios-attackers

    And once again, the media refuses to mention a physical description of the attackers even though the police is still working for him.

  65. superdestroyer says:

    @Chad S:

    The idea that any conservative party will ever be able to appeal to Hispanics is laughable. Do you really think that all of the Hispanics at tier I universities who are getting special support and special benefits because they are Hispanic are ever going to want to run for office as a Republican?

    There is no way that conservative party can survive in the U.S. because virtually all graduates of Tier I universities who are interested politics will become liberal Democrats.

  66. superdestroyer says:

    @Tsar Nicholas:

    Portland is one of the whitest metropolitian areas in the U.S and San Diego County is whiter than California over all http://quickfacts.census.gov/qfd/states/06/06073.html

    Austin Texas is a good example of how white progressive will pack themselves into a few areas to avoid diveristy instead of welcoming it.

  67. superdestroyer says:

    Look at how most of the posters have avoid any real issues that comes with a majority non-white country.

    1. How does the government function when more than 50% of the population is eligible for a quota, set aside, race norming, etc.

    2. How does the U.S. compete in a global marketplace with a population that has moved here from the third world. Look at even a deep blue state seem incapable of producing black or Hispanic engineers, scientist, or high-tech entrepreneurs. How does having to spend more money on ESL or remedial educaiton help the U.S. prepare to compete in a global marketplace?

    3. How high will taxes have to go and how large will the public sector have to grow to support the changes in the population.

    4. What happens as more cities and counties become 99% non-white. How many Detroit’s can the U.S. support? How many Laredo’s can the U.S. fund?

  68. superdestroyer says:

    @anjin-san:

    I think it is hard to claim that the bigots were run out of the Democratic Party when the CBC is running around yelling about “White Folks,” “reparations, set asides, and “separate and unequal treatment.”

  69. Neil Hudelson says:

    @sam:

    That was my same experience living in Charleston, SC. I’m walking down the street, turned down an alley way, and saw a bronze plaque on a liquor store (of all places). I don’t remember the exact text, but essentially it was a bar where Franklin, Washington, and a host of other founders frequented often whenever they were in the city.

    I have bought port at the same place Franklin did. In how many cities can you say that?

  70. Tsar Nicholas says:

    @superdestroyer: Saying that San Diego County is whiter than California at large is like saying Palm Desert is not as hot as Las Vegas.

    Regarding Portland, Ore., when you’re talking about the vibe of a city you also have to factor in foreign tourists, not merely domestic residents. Besides, I said cultural and racial melting pots. Walk the streets of Downtown Portland. It’s a very eclectic mix. I like that. If I wanted a homogenized, whitebread vibe I would live in New Hampshire or in Northern Michigan. Not my cup of tea. I like walking into jazz clubs and seeing yuppies in pinstripe suits hanging out with slackers wearing Misfits T-shirts. I’ve personally been on both sides of that coin.

    Obviously rich liberals congregate in gentrified areas. Everybody knows that. You don’t have to go to Austin, TX to see that. From Pacific Heights and Beverly Hills, CA to New Caanan, CT that’s endemic of areas of concentrated wealth. But that’s not really germane to this topic, is it?

    Dude, in perusing your comments it becomes abundantly clear that you’re obsessed with race and that you directly equate race with class. There’s also an obvious strain of xenophobia coursing through your thought processes. You need to get over these items. Life’s too short.

  71. JKB says:

    @superdestroyer:

    2. I think you’ll find that many who move here from the ‘third world’ do quite nicely in America. Those that embrace the traditional American values of hard work and free enterprise, that is. Just as immigrants have historically. Those that embrace the Democrat way wallow in the mire of dependency, except for the lucky few chosen as symbols and front men by their “betters” on the Left.

    William Rosen in ‘The Most Powerful Idea in the World’ observed that the steam engine was an English-speaking world development (pieces were invented independently elsewhere, but only in the English-speaking world were all the pieces invented). The inventors, however, were not all natives. Many moved to the English-speaking world to take advantage of the freedom to profit from your ideas and inventions. So it is best to worry less about the immigrants and more about the culture of dependency politics that steals their dreams and industriousness.

    Funny thing, it was the opportunities in America, the right to profit from your ideas, to open a business with out permission of the government that afforded many past immigrants, who were not embraced by the dominant culture, the opportunities to build wealth and, even status. But now, you must not be too successful, there is a limit where you’ve made enough money and your business operates at the whim of politicians, regulators and other assorted dominant culture agents. I wonder why that is?

  72. JKB says:

    Well, compared to your magnificence @anjin-san: we all sound ignorant. But please, feel free to call me an ignorant slut, just don’t call me Jane.

    BTW, the only bigot I’ve been around in the last 30 years is a hard core Democrat, who’d never, ever vote for a Republican. Relax, she’s my aunt’s childhood friend in her 80s. They remain friends by not discussing politics but it is presumed she just didn’t participate in the 2008 Presidential ballot.

  73. Gromitt Gunn says:

    @superdestroyer: You clearly have never been to Austin.

  74. anjin-san says:

    BTW, the only bigot I’ve been around in the last 30 years is a hard core

    Guess you don’t get out much.

  75. Rob in CT says:

    I think that what drives this stuff is a terrible fear of being subjected to “revenge” treatment (treated as white people, now mostly dead, used to treat black people, now mostly dead).

    I think that’s the core of it. It’s a terrifying prospect, if you actually consider it possible.

  76. al-Ameda says:

    @JKB:

    BTW, the only bigot I’ve been around in the last 30 years is a hard core Democrat, who’d never, ever vote for a Republican.

    Well then, that settles it – once that person passes way, then racism will be gone.

  77. sam says:

    @Neil Hudelson:

    Yeah. I was walking up Mass Ave in Cambridge once when I first moved there and came upon a marble marker that said something to the effect that on this spot are buried a number of British soldiers killed on the retreat from Concord. Sent a frisson up my spine I can tell you.

  78. sam says:

    @superdestroyer:

    Look at how most of the posters have avoid any real issues that comes with a majority non-white country.

    Ah for Christ’s sake. You are the person I directed my Thursday, May 17, 2012 at 14:52 at. You are truly fvcking hopeless.

  79. rachel pendergraft says:

    Shocking how many relish at the genocide of whites. If you don’t understand what genocide is, read the Geneva Convention definition again. Why are you so hateful and selfish? If a multi-racial society is so great than I think it is your duty to move to India, China, or Zimbabwe and be on the cutting edge of creating a multi racial society in currently hemogenous nations. Why let others do the work? Why not be a pioneer? Or if you don’t have what it takes to move that far, how about moving to East St. Louis. It is so black and lacks in diversity. In fact, there are lots of “minority” majority areas that really need some diversity. Step up to the plate and live your words. I’m sure you won’t get bored being the token white guy.

  80. al-Ameda says:

    @superdestroyer:

    The demographics of the U.S. in the future is the politics of California today. Do you really believe that governance in California has benefited from Diversity?

    Step up and live by my words? That’s certainly not a problem for me.

    By the way, are you saying that diversity has caused California to have a dysfunctional state legislature, or to have a $16B budget deficit? I am saying that I like living in a state or a region that has ethnic and cultural diversity, and I’m not saying that that diversity is the cause of our political dysfunction.

  81. James says:

    @superdestroyer:

    The demographics of the U.S. in the future is the politics of California today. Do you really believe that governance in California has benefited from Diversity?

    Sigh. Correlation ≠ causation.

  82. al-Ameda says:

    @rachel pendergraft:

    Shocking how many relish at the genocide of whites.

    Shocking how there is no evidence of that – shocking.

    East St. Louis? I’ll see your East St Louis and raise you Richmond CA.

    What I find shocking is how many conservatives – who routinely trash liberals and deride really liberal cities like Santa Monica (“People’s Republic of …. ) – like to live in those places. For example, David Horowitz lives in Santa Monica, Michael Savage lives in Tiburon, in Marin County, CA. You’d think they’d want to live in conservative cities like Oklahoma City or Dallas?

  83. superdestroyer says:

    @al-Ameda:

    California has had a higher unemployment rate than Texas in every month for the last 20 years. Even during the dot.com boom, California has a higher than average unemployment rate. Coupled that with white students who under perform versus white students in most other states and coupled with many corporations moving their headquarters out of California and I would say that diversity is not very good for most people.

    It seems to work best for small tribal clans that can function as an extended family and take advantage of government goodies while paying little in taxes.

  84. superdestroyer says:

    @James:

    But California cannot support its large immigrant underclass while trying to have a high tax, high benefit government. 20 years of budget problems should convinced anyone of the problems that California has due to its diversity.

    People have already forgotten when Southern California was the place that white kids from the midwest wanted to move. Now the number of whites in California has been going down for 20 years.

  85. superdestroyer says:

    @al-Ameda:

    Dallas is not a conservative city. The suburbans, some of the richest counties in the U.S., are conservative, but since Dallas is majority black and Hispanics, it is actually very liberal. Just like Cleveland, St Louis, Detroit, Baltimore, Newark are very liberal yet devoid of white progressives.

  86. superdestroyer says:

    @Tsar Nicholas:

    Portland has the whitest urban center in the U.S.

    Giving portland as an example of diversity is incorrect. the most diverse places in the U.S. these days are some of the urban suburbans that are still safe enough for whites and Asians to live. And they are generally places that white progressives to do like.